Isaias, Pedro.

E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches : Theory and Implementation. - 1st ed. - 1 online resource (334 pages) - eBooks on Demand .

Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Contributors -- Chapter-1 -- E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches: Theory and Implementation -- 1.1 E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches: Theory and Implementation-An Overview -- References -- Part I -- Exploratory Learning Technologies -- Chapter-2 -- Measuring Problem Solving Skills in Portal 2 -- 2.1 Literature Review -- 2.1.1 Problem-Solving Ability -- 2.1.2 Materials -- 2.1.3 Game-Based Stealth Assessment -- 2.2 Method -- 2.2.1 Participants -- 2.2.2 Procedures -- 2.2.3 Assessment in Portal 2 -- 2.2.4 External Outcome Measures -- 2.3 Results -- 2.4 Discussion -- References -- Chapter-3 -- iPads in Inclusive Classrooms: Ecologies of Learning -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 iPads in Education -- 3.3 Arguing for an Ecology of Learning with iPads -- 3.4 iPads and School Development -- 3.5 Tablets in the Classroom-Middletown School -- 3.5.1 Classroom Resources and iPad Usage-Socio-Material Bricolage -- 3.5.2 Bricolage in the Ecology of Learning Resources -- 3.5.3 Whiteboard to iPad: Small Screen to Big Screen Relationships -- 3.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-4 -- Supporting the Strengths and Activity of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Strength-Based Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment -- 4.3 Method -- 4.3.1 Settings -- 4.3.2 Data Collection and Analysis -- 4.4 Results -- 4.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-5 -- Learning with the Simpleshow -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The Simpleshow -- 5.3 Empirical Investigation -- 5.3.1 Pilot Study -- 5.3.2 School Study -- 5.3.2.1 Study "Parliamentary Election" -- 5.3.2.2 Study "Fall of the Berlin Wall" -- 5.3.3 Teachers' Perspectives -- 5.3.4 Discussion -- 5.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part II -- E-Learning Social Web Design -- Chapter-6. Live, Laugh and Love to Learn Turning Learning from Traditional to Transformational -- 6.1 Towards Authentic and Creative Learning Environments -- 6.2 Dimensions of twentieth Century Teaching -- 6.3 From Traditional to Transformational Learning -- 6.3.1 At the Heart of the Knowledge Acquisition -- 6.4 The Contextual-Pedagogical Learning Process -- 6.4.1 Assessment -- 6.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-7 -- The Configuration Process of a Community of Practice in the Collective Text Editor -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Community of Practice -- 7.3 The Collective Text Editor-CTE -- 7.4 The Choice of the Collective Text Editor -- 7.5 Final Thoughts -- References -- Chapter-8 -- Using an Ontological and Rule-Based Approach for Contextual Semantic Annotations in Online Communities -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Background and Related Work -- 8.2.1 Knowledge Capitalization -- 8.2.2 Related Work -- 8.3 A New Approach -- 8.3.1 Knowledge Capitalization Process -- 8.3.2 Contextual Annotation Model -- 8.3.2.1 Resource -- 8.3.2.2 Annotation -- 8.3.2.3 Context -- 8.3.2.4 Controlled Vocabulary -- 8.3.3 Context Reasoning -- 8.3.3.1 Ontological Reasoning -- 8.3.3.2 Rule-Based Reasoning -- 8.3.4 Context-Aware Architecture for CoPEAnnot -- 8.4 Implementation -- 8.5 Evaluation -- 8.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-9 -- Recognizing and Analyzing Emotional Expressions in Movements -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Review of Systems For the Recognition of Emotions -- 9.3 Identification of Human Body Movements -- 9.4 A Vector Model of the Skeleton -- 9.5 Formalization of Human Movements -- 9.6 Evaluation of Similarity Between the Identified and Etalon Movements -- 9.7 Definition Contours of Human Hands -- 9.8 Use For Teaching Children With Hearing Disabilities -- 9.9 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-10. Student-Driven Classroom Technologies: Transmedia Navigation and Tranformative Communications -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Conceptual Rationale -- 10.2.1 A Design-Based Research and Methodology -- 10.2.2 Transformative Communications -- 10.2.3 Learning Technologies in Education -- 10.2.4 Classroom Activities: Transmedia and Learning -- 10.3 Student Attitudes Towards Learning With Technology -- 10.4 Study Participants -- 10.5 Findings -- 10.6 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Part III -- Learner Communities Through E-Learning Im plementations -- Chapter-11 -- ICT Support for Collaborative Learning-A Tale of Two Cities -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 ICT and e-learning, Opportunities for Higher Education -- 11.2.1 Educational Viewpoint -- 11.2.2 Management Viewpoint -- 11.2.3 Barriers and Preferences -- 11.2.4 Opportunities -- 11.2.5 Designing a Flexible Electronic Learning Environment -- 11.3 The Course Domain: Service Design -- 11.4 The Context: Two Cities -- 11.4.1 A Pilot Electronic Learning Environment -- 11.4.2 Providing Structure-A Concept Map -- 11.4.3 Organizing the Course for Different Locations -- 11.5 The Current Version of the Elecronic Learning Environment -- 11.5.1 Global Approach -- 11.5.2 The Actual Design -- 11.5.3 Adaptation to Each Individual Class is Needed -- 11.5.4 Student Opinions on the ELE -- 11.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-12 -- The Investigation of Pre-Service Teachers' Concerns About Web 2.0 Technologies in Education -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Web 2.0 Technologies and Pre-Service Teacher Concern -- 12.3 Methodology -- 12.3.1 Participants -- 12.3.2 Data Collection -- 12.3.3 Data Analysis -- 12.4 Results -- 12.5 Discussion -- 12.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-13 -- Teacher Training Using Interactive Technologies: Performance and Assessment in Second Life and Simschool -- 13.1 Introduction. 13.2 Conceptual Rationale -- 13.3 Simulated Learning Environments -- 13.3.1 Classroom Management in Second Life -- 13.3.2 Constructing Knowledge in Second Life -- 13.3.3 Scenario Enactments -- 13.3.4 Student Intern Responses -- 13.4 Virtual Pedagogical Practice in Simschool -- 13.4.1 Computational Representations of Teaching and Learning -- 13.4.2 Indications from simSchool Research -- 13.5 Similarities and Differences -- 13.5.1 Similarities -- 13.5.2 Differences -- 13.6 Discussion -- 13.6.1 Implementation Issues -- 13.6.2 Assessment Challenges and Opportunities -- 13.6.2.1 Assessment Considerations for Role-Playing Models -- 13.6.2.2 Assessment Considerations for Computational Models -- 13.7 Summary and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-14 -- A Study on Improving Information Processing Abilities Based on PBL -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Background Theory -- 14.2.1 Information Processing Abilities -- 14.2.2 Examination of the Literature -- 14.3 Study Method -- 14.3.1 Participants and Period of the Study -- 14.3.2 Assessment Method -- 14.3.3 Design of the Study -- 14.3.4 Apply PBL Process for Information Processing Abilities -- 14.4 Research Results -- 14.4.1 Research on the Actual Condition of Information Processing Ability Before Applying PBL -- 14.4.2 Comparing Information Processing Abilities After Applying PBL. -- 14.5 Conclusion -- References -- Part IV -- Collaborative and Student-Centered E-Learning Design -- Chapter-15 -- Constructivism vs Constructionism: Implications for Minecraft and Classroom Implementation -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Minecraft -- 15.2.1 Constructionism in the Context of Minecraft -- 15.2.2 Piaget's Constructivist Theory of Cognitive Development -- 15.2.3 Papert's Constructionism -- 15.3 Research Methods -- 15.4 Results and Discussion -- 15.4.1 The Next New Thing -- 15.4.2 A Thousand Tiny Cuts -- 15.5 Conclusion. References -- Chapter-16 -- Student-Centered, e-Learning Design \in a University Classroom -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Review of Literature -- 16.2.1 Contemporary Instructional Challenges -- 16.2.2 Instructional Engagement -- 16.2.3 Rethinking Technology's Role -- 16.2.4 Instructional Innovation -- 16.3 Methods -- 16.3.1 Rationale -- 16.3.2 Course Redesign Training -- 16.3.3 Redesign Components -- 16.4 Results -- 16.4.1 Data -- 16.4.2 Practical Application -- 16.4.3 Limitations -- 16.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-17 -- Some Psychometric and Design Implications of Game-Based Learning Analytics -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Context and Log Files -- 17.3 Tools and Methods -- 17.3.1 Symbolic Regression -- 17.3.2 Counts -- 17.3.3 Rule Discovery with Machine Learning -- 17.3.4 Network Analysis -- 17.3.5 Cluster Analysis -- 17.4 Explanatory Constructs and Reflections -- 17.5 Psychometric Implications from the Analyses -- 17.6 Implications for Design of Virtual Performance Assessments -- 17.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-18 -- Self-Assessment and Reflection in a 1st Semester Course for Software Engineering Students -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Methods -- 18.3 Results -- 18.4 Discussion -- 18.4.1 Analysis of the Results of the Pre Questionnaire -- 18.4.2 Analysis of the Results of the Post Questionnaire and Comparison From the Lecturer's Perspective -- 18.4.3 Analysis of the Results of the Post Questionnaire and Comparison From the Students' Perspective -- 18.4.4 Evaluation of the Questionnaire -- 18.4.5 Future Work -- 18.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-19 -- Don't Waste Student Work: Using Classroom Assignments to Contribute to Online Resources -- 19.1 Introduction -- 19.2 Assignment Types -- 19.2.1 Paper Summaries -- 19.2.2 Wikibooks -- 19.2.3 Podcast Transcript Writing -- 19.2.4 Creation of Mnemonics for a Wiki. 19.2.5 Online Flash Cards.

9783319058252


Computer-assisted instruction.


Electronic books.

L1-991

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