Drake, Simone C.

Critical Appropriations : African American Women and the Construction of Transnational Identity - Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2014. - 1 online resource (201 p.) - Southern Literary Studies . - Southern Literary Studies .

Description based upon print version of record.

COVER; CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION; PART ONE: Toward a Critical Gender Consciousness; 1. When Home Is Paradise: Appropriating Acts in Toni Morrison's Paradise; 2. Romanticizing Diaspora and Remembering Zora in Erna Brodber's Louisiana; PART TWO: Popular Culture, Transnational Feminism, and the Limits of Sisterhood; 3. Transnational Sisterhood: Beyoncé and Shakira Sexing the Difference; PART THREE: Third Wave Feminism, Paradigm Shifts, and Black Masculinity; 4. He Said Nothing: Brasilidade and Aphasia in Danzy Senna's Caucasia and Gayl Jones's Corregidora 5. The Sight/Site of Transgression in Eve's BayouEPILOGUE: Loose Your Mother: A Different Route Home; NOTES; WORKS CITED; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

From the novels of Toni Morrison to the music of Beyoncé Knowles, the cultural prevalence of a transnational black identity, as created by African American women, is more than a product of geographic mobility. Rather, as author Simone C. Drake shows, these constructions illuminate our understanding of a chronically marginalized demographic. In Critical Appropriations, Drake contends that these fluid and hetero-geneous characterizations of black females arise from multiple creative outlets -- literature, film, and music videos -- and reflect African Ameri-can women''s evolving concept of home, community, gender, and family.Through a close examination of Toni Morrison''s Paradise, Danzy Senna''s Caucasia, Gayl Jones''s Corregidora, Erna Brodber''s Louisiana, and Kasi Lemmons''s film Eve''s Bayou, as well as Beyoncé Knowles''s B-Day album and music-video collaboration with Shakira, "Beautiful Liar," Drake reveals how concepts of hybridity -- whether positioned as créolité, Candomblé, négritude, Latinidad, or Brasilidade -- are appropriated in each work of art as a way of challenging the homogeneous paradigm of black cultural studies. This redefined notion of identity enables African American women to embrace a more complex, transnational blackness that is not only more liberating but also more pertinent to their experiences. Drawing from this borderless exchange of ideas and a richer concept of self, Critical Appropriations offers a rewarding reconsideration of the creative implications for African American women, mapping new directions in black women''s studies.

9780807153888 35.00 (NL)


African diaspora in literature.
American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism.
American literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism.
Women, Black -- Race identity.
Women, Black, in literature.


Electronic books.

PS153.N5 D73 2014

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