Moseley, Ralph.

Developing Web Applications. - Hoboken : Wiley, 2014. - 1 online resource (411 p.) - eBooks on Demand .

Developing Web Applications; Contents; Preface; Introduction; Features; Additional Materials; Trademark; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: The Way the Web Works; 1.1 History; 1.1.1 The WWW; 1.2 The Internet and the WWW; 1.3 Protocols and Programs; 1.3.1 Files; 1.3.2 Problems with FTP; 1.3.3 Email; 1.3.4 Instant Messaging; 1.3.5 Remote Machine Access; 1.3.6 Web Pages; 1.4 Secure Connections; 1.5 Applications and Development Tools; 1.6 The Web Browser; 1.6.1 Choices; 1.7 Chapter Summary; Chapter 2: The Client Side: HTML; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 The Development Process; 2.2.1 Requirements; 2.2.2 Design 2.2.3 Write Code2.2.4 Test; 2.2.5 Upload; 2.2.6 Re-Iterate; 2.3 Basic HTML; 2.3.1 Loading Pages with the Browser; 2.3.2 A Page on the Web; 2.3.3 HTML Document Structure; 2.4 Formatting and Fonts; 2.4.1 Using Types of Emphasis; 2.4.2 Pre-Formatted Text; 2.4.3 Font Sizes; 2.5 Commenting Code; 2.6 Color; 2.7 Hyperlinks; 2.8 Lists; 2.8.1 Unordered Lists; 2.8.2 Ordered Lists; 2.8.3 Nested Lists; 2.8.4 Definition Lists; 2.9 Tables; 2.9.1 Table Structure; 2.9.2 Table Headers; 2.9.3 Irregular Tables; 2.9.4 Tables and Page Layout; 2.10 Images; 2.10.1 Positioning and Placing Images 2.10.2 Resizing an Image2.10.3 Background Images; 2.11 Simple HTML Forms; 2.11.1 Making a Form; 2.11.2 Types of Input; 2.11.3 Text Areas; 2.11.4 Drop Down Menus; 2.12 Web Site Structure; 2.13 Chapter Summary; Chapter 3: From Html to XHTML; 3.1 More History, More Standards; 3.1.1 Changes; 3.1.2 XML; 3.2 The Move to XHTML; 3.2.1 Document Structure; 3.2.2 Some Other Differences; 3.3 Meta Tags; 3.3.1 Memory Cache; 3.3.2 Formatting with scheme; 3.4 Character Entities; 3.5 Frames and Framesets; 3.5.1 Rows; 3.5.2 Alternative Content; 3.5.3 Columns; 3.5.4 Frames Using Columns and Rows 3.5.5 Nesting Frames3.5.6 Inline Frames; 3.6 What Is Inside a Browser?; 3.7 Chapter Summary; Chapter 4: Getting Some Style: CSS; 4.1 The Need for CSS; 4.2 Introduction to CSS; 4.3 Basic Syntax and Structure; 4.3.1 Rules; 4.3.2 Classes; 4.3.3 ID; 4.3.4 Pseudo-Class Selectors; 4.4 Using CSS; 4.4.1 External Style Sheets; 4.4.2 Embedded Style Sheets; 4.5 Background Images, Colors and Properties; 4.5.1 Background Color; 4.5.2 Background Images; 4.6 Manipulating Text; 4.6.1 Text Decoration; 4.6.2 Text Indentation; 4.6.3 Text Case; 4.7 Using Fonts; 4.8 Borders and Boxes; 4.9 Margins; 4.10 Padding 4.11 Lists4.12 Positioning Using CSS; 4.12.1 Absolutely!; 4.12.2 It's All Relative; 4.12.3 The Z-Index; 4.12.4 Shaping an Element; 4.12.5 Floating Elements; 4.12.6 Layout and Structure; 4.13 CSS2; 4.14 Chapter Summary; Chapter 5: Javascript: Introduction to Client side Scripting; 5.1 What Is JavaScript?; 5.2 How to Develop JavaScript; 5.3 Simple JavaScript; 5.3.1 Embedded; 5.3.2 External Scripts; 5.4 Variables; 5.4.1 Scope; 5.4.2 Assignments; 5.4.3 Strings; 5.4.4 Arrays; 5.5 Functions; 5.6 Conditions; 5.6.1 Switch; 5.6.2 Conditional Operator; 5.7 Loops and Repetition; 5.8 Chapter Summary Chapter 6: Javascript: Developing More Advanced Scripts

Building applications for the Internet is a complex and fast-moving field which utilizes a variety of continually evolving technologies. Whether your perspective is from the client or server side, there are many languages to master - X(HTML), JavaScript, PHP, XML and CSS to name but a few. These languages have to work together cleanly, logically and in harmony with the systems they run on, and be compatible with any browsers with which they interact. Developing Web Applications presents script writing and good programming practice but also allows students to see how the individual technologi

9780470028964 75 (NL)


Application software -- Development.
Internet programming.
Web site development.


Electronic books.

TK5105.888 .M684 2014

006.7/6 006.76