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Deconstructing Reagan : Conservative Mythology and America's Fortieth President.

By: Longley, Kyle.
Contributor(s): Mayer, Jeremy | Schaller, Michael | Sloan, John W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Armonk : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2007Description: 1 online resource (150 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317473244.Subject(s): Conservatism -- United States | Public opinion -- United States | Reagan, Ronald -- Influence | Reagan, Ronald -- Public opinion | Symbolism in politics -- United States | United States -- Politics and government -- 1945-1989 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1981-1989Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Deconstructing Reagan: Conservative Mythology and America's Fortieth PresidentDDC classification: 973.927092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Introduction: American Conservatism -- 1. Reagan and the Cold War -- 2. The Economic Costs of Reagan Mythology -- 3. Reagan and Race: Prophet of Color Blindness, Baiter of the Backlash -- 4. When Character Was King? Ronald Reagan and the Issues of Ethics and Morality -- Epilogue: Contemporary Politics and the Myths of Reagan -- Notes -- About the Authors -- Index.
Summary: Although he left office nearly 20 years ago, Ronald Reagan remains a potent symbol for the conservative movement. The Bush administration frequently invokes his legacy as it formulates and promotes its fiscal, domestic, and foreign policies. His name is watchword for campus conservatives who regard him in a way that borders on hero worship. Conservative media pundits often equate the term "Reagan-esque" with personal honor, fiscal rectitude, and unqualified success in dealing with foreign threats. But how much of the Reagan legacy is based on fact, how much on idealized myth? And what are the reasons - political and otherwise - behind the mythmaking? "Deconstructing Reagan" is a fascinating study of the interplay of politics and memory concerning our fortieth president. While giving credit where credit is due, the authors scrutinize key aspects of the Reagan legacy and the conservative mythology that surrounds it.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E877.2 -- .D44 2007 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1968863 Available EBC1968863

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Introduction: American Conservatism -- 1. Reagan and the Cold War -- 2. The Economic Costs of Reagan Mythology -- 3. Reagan and Race: Prophet of Color Blindness, Baiter of the Backlash -- 4. When Character Was King? Ronald Reagan and the Issues of Ethics and Morality -- Epilogue: Contemporary Politics and the Myths of Reagan -- Notes -- About the Authors -- Index.

Although he left office nearly 20 years ago, Ronald Reagan remains a potent symbol for the conservative movement. The Bush administration frequently invokes his legacy as it formulates and promotes its fiscal, domestic, and foreign policies. His name is watchword for campus conservatives who regard him in a way that borders on hero worship. Conservative media pundits often equate the term "Reagan-esque" with personal honor, fiscal rectitude, and unqualified success in dealing with foreign threats. But how much of the Reagan legacy is based on fact, how much on idealized myth? And what are the reasons - political and otherwise - behind the mythmaking? "Deconstructing Reagan" is a fascinating study of the interplay of politics and memory concerning our fortieth president. While giving credit where credit is due, the authors scrutinize key aspects of the Reagan legacy and the conservative mythology that surrounds it.

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