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The President, the State and the Cold War : Comparing the foreign policies of Truman and Reagan.

By: Bilsland, James.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Studies in US Foreign Policy: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (237 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317594901.Subject(s): Cold War | Presidents -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Reagan, Ronald -- Political and social views | Truman, Harry S., -- 1884-1972 -- Political and social views | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1953 | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1981-1989Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The President, the State and the Cold War : Comparing the foreign policies of Truman and ReaganDDC classification: 327.73 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgements -- 1. Introduction -- Research questions -- Literature review -- Analytical framework -- Methodology -- Outline of chapters -- Notes -- 2. The president, the presidency and US foreign policy -- Introduction -- Constitutional origins -- The Constitution in practice -- Accumulation of presidential power -- Congressional deference, delegation and opposition -- The president as an individual -- The president and the executive branch -- The president and Congress -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 3. Truman's worldview and the origins of containment in Greece and Turkey -- Introduction -- Historical context -- Truman's worldview -- The Truman Doctrine -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 4. Truman's management style and the Korean War -- Introduction -- Truman's management style -- Korea case study -- Truman's management style: loyalty and group harmony -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 5. Reagan's worldview and management style -- Introduction -- The historical context of the Reagan administration and Reagan's worldview -- The Reagan Doctrine -- Reagan's management system -- Reagan's management style -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 6. Reagan and Nicaragua -- Introduction -- Framing Nicaragua as a security concern -- Reagan re-asserts -- Reagan's management system failures -- Reagan's weakness -- Mining the harbours -- The search for alternative sources of funding -- Reagan's management system: collapse -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 7. Comparison of Truman and Reagan -- Introduction -- External sources and constraints: the international system -- Internal sources and constraints: the executive bureaucracy -- Domestic sources and constraints: Congress -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 8. Conclusion -- Introduction -- Truman: wider context and legacy -- Reagan: wider context and legacy.
Conceptual implications -- Looking forward and future research -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: US foreign policy during the Cold War has been analysed from a number of perspectives, generating large bodies of literature attempting to explain its origins, its development and its conclusion. However, there are still many questions left only partially explained. In large part this is because these accounts restrict themselves to a single level of analysis, either the international system, or the structure of the state and society. The first level of analysis, focusing on the role of individuals, has largely been excluded. This book argues that structural theories, and any approach that limits itself to one level of analysis, are inadequate to explain the development of US foreign policy. Instead, it is necessary to incorporate the first level of analysis in order to bring human agency back and provide a more detailed explanation of US foreign policy. Bilsland proposes an analytical framework which incorporates presidential agency into a multi-level analysis of US foreign policy during the Cold War, constructing a multi-level case study comparison of the foreign policies of Presidents Truman and Reagan. He argues that the worldview of the president is central to agenda setting in US foreign policy making and that the management style of the president influences both decision-making and the implementation of US foreign policy. Evidence to support this is drawn from detailed empirical analysis of Truman's foreign policy of containment in Korea and Reagan's foreign policy of rollback in Nicaragua. This work will be of interest to students and scholars of US Foreign Policy, US History and International Relations.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E814 -- .B557 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1974297 Available EBC1974297

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgements -- 1. Introduction -- Research questions -- Literature review -- Analytical framework -- Methodology -- Outline of chapters -- Notes -- 2. The president, the presidency and US foreign policy -- Introduction -- Constitutional origins -- The Constitution in practice -- Accumulation of presidential power -- Congressional deference, delegation and opposition -- The president as an individual -- The president and the executive branch -- The president and Congress -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 3. Truman's worldview and the origins of containment in Greece and Turkey -- Introduction -- Historical context -- Truman's worldview -- The Truman Doctrine -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 4. Truman's management style and the Korean War -- Introduction -- Truman's management style -- Korea case study -- Truman's management style: loyalty and group harmony -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 5. Reagan's worldview and management style -- Introduction -- The historical context of the Reagan administration and Reagan's worldview -- The Reagan Doctrine -- Reagan's management system -- Reagan's management style -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 6. Reagan and Nicaragua -- Introduction -- Framing Nicaragua as a security concern -- Reagan re-asserts -- Reagan's management system failures -- Reagan's weakness -- Mining the harbours -- The search for alternative sources of funding -- Reagan's management system: collapse -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 7. Comparison of Truman and Reagan -- Introduction -- External sources and constraints: the international system -- Internal sources and constraints: the executive bureaucracy -- Domestic sources and constraints: Congress -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 8. Conclusion -- Introduction -- Truman: wider context and legacy -- Reagan: wider context and legacy.

Conceptual implications -- Looking forward and future research -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

US foreign policy during the Cold War has been analysed from a number of perspectives, generating large bodies of literature attempting to explain its origins, its development and its conclusion. However, there are still many questions left only partially explained. In large part this is because these accounts restrict themselves to a single level of analysis, either the international system, or the structure of the state and society. The first level of analysis, focusing on the role of individuals, has largely been excluded. This book argues that structural theories, and any approach that limits itself to one level of analysis, are inadequate to explain the development of US foreign policy. Instead, it is necessary to incorporate the first level of analysis in order to bring human agency back and provide a more detailed explanation of US foreign policy. Bilsland proposes an analytical framework which incorporates presidential agency into a multi-level analysis of US foreign policy during the Cold War, constructing a multi-level case study comparison of the foreign policies of Presidents Truman and Reagan. He argues that the worldview of the president is central to agenda setting in US foreign policy making and that the management style of the president influences both decision-making and the implementation of US foreign policy. Evidence to support this is drawn from detailed empirical analysis of Truman's foreign policy of containment in Korea and Reagan's foreign policy of rollback in Nicaragua. This work will be of interest to students and scholars of US Foreign Policy, US History and International Relations.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

James Bilsland recently completed his PhD at the University of Glasgow and is currently a member of the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology at Newcastle University.

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