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A History of Czechs and Jews : A Slavic Jerusalem.

By: Wein, Martin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Jewish Studies Series: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (570 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317608219.Subject(s): Czech Republic -- Ethnic relations | Jews -- Czech Republic -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A History of Czechs and Jews : A Slavic JerusalemDDC classification: 943.7004924 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of figures -- Preface -- Acknowledgments and dedications -- List of abbreviations -- 1. Theoretical introduction -- History and collective memory -- Transnational history -- German Romantic philosophy -- Making and writing history -- 2. Historical background: from Czech-German to Czech-Jewish national friendship, 1780-1918 -- Czech-German Bohemia -- Romantic forgeries -- The Young Bohemians -- The Czech-Jewish movement and Czech-speaking Jews -- Prague and Josefstadt -- Blood libels in the Bohemian lands -- Hilsner and Masaryk in memory -- "Masaryk and the Jews" -- Tegemania -- 3. The Balfour Declaration, Czechoslovakia's independence, and the interwar period, 1917-38 -- Small nations -- Czechoslovakia as a model democracy? -- Hatikva and Vltava -- Czechs, Jews, Germans, Arabs -- Prague's German literary circles -- Musa Dagh -- Czechoslovak Jews and Communism -- 4. From the partition of Czechoslovakia to the partition of British Palestine, 1938-48 -- The Munich Agreement in international memory -- War propaganda in London and New York -- Lidice in the Palestine Post -- Theresienstadt in memory -- The Topol'čany pogrom -- Transfers and transferences -- Body counts -- 5. Communist Czechoslovakia and Israel, 1948-89 -- Czechoslovakia, Israel, Egypt, and the Great Powers -- Czechoslovak-Israeli-Soviet relations -- Israel's Czech-German guns -- Antisemitic show trials -- The Prague Trial and the defendants -- Israeli reactions -- Memories of the Prague Trial -- The Six-Day War, Prague Spring, and "Normalization" -- The Czechoslovak Jewish survivor community -- 6. The Velvet Revolution, the breakup of Czechoslovakia, and the Middle East conflict, 1989-2012 -- Remembering the Velvet Revolution -- The Jewish community in the Czech Republic -- Czech-Israeli relations.
Oslo polemics in the Middle East -- "Roots Tourism" -- Return of the Golem -- Conclusion -- Appendix -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: Was Israel founded by Czechoslovakia? A History of Czechs and Jews examines this question and the resulting findings are complex. Czechoslovakia did provide critical, secret military sponsorship to Israel around 1948, but this alliance was short-lived and terminated with the Prague Trial of 1952. Israel's "Czech guns" were German as much as Czech, and the Soviet Union strongly encouraged Czechoslovakia's help for Israel. Most importantly however, the Czechoslovak-Israeli military cooperation was only part of a much larger picture. Since the mid-1800s, Czechs and Jews have been systematically comparing themselves to each other in literature, music, politics, diplomacy, media, and historiography. A shared perception of similar fates of two small nations trapped between East and West, in constant existential danger, helped forge a Czech-Jewish "national friendship" amid periods of estrangement. Yet, this Czech-Jewish national friendship, an idea that can be traced from Masaryk and Kafka via Weizman and Ben Gurion to Havel and Netanyahu, was more myth than reality. Relations were often mixed and highly dependent on larger historical developments affecting Central Europe and the Middle East. As the Czech Republic emerges as Israel's main EU ally, this book provides a timely analysis of this old-new alliance and is essential reading for students and scholars with an interest in History and Jewish Studies.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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DS135.C95 -- .W49 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1974352 Available EBC1974352

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of figures -- Preface -- Acknowledgments and dedications -- List of abbreviations -- 1. Theoretical introduction -- History and collective memory -- Transnational history -- German Romantic philosophy -- Making and writing history -- 2. Historical background: from Czech-German to Czech-Jewish national friendship, 1780-1918 -- Czech-German Bohemia -- Romantic forgeries -- The Young Bohemians -- The Czech-Jewish movement and Czech-speaking Jews -- Prague and Josefstadt -- Blood libels in the Bohemian lands -- Hilsner and Masaryk in memory -- "Masaryk and the Jews" -- Tegemania -- 3. The Balfour Declaration, Czechoslovakia's independence, and the interwar period, 1917-38 -- Small nations -- Czechoslovakia as a model democracy? -- Hatikva and Vltava -- Czechs, Jews, Germans, Arabs -- Prague's German literary circles -- Musa Dagh -- Czechoslovak Jews and Communism -- 4. From the partition of Czechoslovakia to the partition of British Palestine, 1938-48 -- The Munich Agreement in international memory -- War propaganda in London and New York -- Lidice in the Palestine Post -- Theresienstadt in memory -- The Topol'čany pogrom -- Transfers and transferences -- Body counts -- 5. Communist Czechoslovakia and Israel, 1948-89 -- Czechoslovakia, Israel, Egypt, and the Great Powers -- Czechoslovak-Israeli-Soviet relations -- Israel's Czech-German guns -- Antisemitic show trials -- The Prague Trial and the defendants -- Israeli reactions -- Memories of the Prague Trial -- The Six-Day War, Prague Spring, and "Normalization" -- The Czechoslovak Jewish survivor community -- 6. The Velvet Revolution, the breakup of Czechoslovakia, and the Middle East conflict, 1989-2012 -- Remembering the Velvet Revolution -- The Jewish community in the Czech Republic -- Czech-Israeli relations.

Oslo polemics in the Middle East -- "Roots Tourism" -- Return of the Golem -- Conclusion -- Appendix -- Bibliography -- Index.

Was Israel founded by Czechoslovakia? A History of Czechs and Jews examines this question and the resulting findings are complex. Czechoslovakia did provide critical, secret military sponsorship to Israel around 1948, but this alliance was short-lived and terminated with the Prague Trial of 1952. Israel's "Czech guns" were German as much as Czech, and the Soviet Union strongly encouraged Czechoslovakia's help for Israel. Most importantly however, the Czechoslovak-Israeli military cooperation was only part of a much larger picture. Since the mid-1800s, Czechs and Jews have been systematically comparing themselves to each other in literature, music, politics, diplomacy, media, and historiography. A shared perception of similar fates of two small nations trapped between East and West, in constant existential danger, helped forge a Czech-Jewish "national friendship" amid periods of estrangement. Yet, this Czech-Jewish national friendship, an idea that can be traced from Masaryk and Kafka via Weizman and Ben Gurion to Havel and Netanyahu, was more myth than reality. Relations were often mixed and highly dependent on larger historical developments affecting Central Europe and the Middle East. As the Czech Republic emerges as Israel's main EU ally, this book provides a timely analysis of this old-new alliance and is essential reading for students and scholars with an interest in History and Jewish Studies.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Wein (New York Univ. Tel Aviv) analyzes two themes in his study. One is the often-fraught history of relations between Czechs and Jews from the late 18th century to the present; the other is the tie between Czechs and the state of Israel. The former is related to the question of whether Czech Jews should be seen as German Jewish or as Czech-speaking Jews identified with the fortunes of Bohemia and later Czechoslovakia. This issue reached its height in the communist era, when many Czech Jews who were party leaders (e.g., Rudolf Slánský) perished in the purges of the 1950s. Wein frames the latter theme within the context of whether the Czechs helped support the Zionist movement, helped found Israel, and subsequently supported it as an ally. The author's arguments, though always interesting, are often subtle and sometimes tenuously based in analogies. Thus, Wein does not fully answer the implicit question of his subtitle as to whether Prague was a Slavic Jerusalem. Other arguments are rather narrowly contextualized, including, for example, the issue of Czech support for the establishment of Israel. Numerous effective illustrations. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Paul W. Knoll, emeritus, University of Southern California

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Martin Wein teaches at New York University and Tel Aviv University. His research focuses on Bohemian history, Czechoslovak-Israeli relations, and the triangular relationship of religion-language-nationalism in global contexts.</p> <p> </p>

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