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The Rise of Big Government.

By: Vatter, Harold G.
Contributor(s): Walker, John F.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Armonk : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©1997Description: 1 online resource (276 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317454854.Subject(s): USAGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Rise of Big GovernmentDDC classification: 320.904 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- List of Tables -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter One. The Erosion of Laissez-Faire -- Chapter Two. The Beginnings of the Mixed Economy, 1930-46 -- Chapter Three. The Postwar Economy and Government Growth -- Chapter Four. Fiscal Policy and Government Growth -- Chapter Five. The Rise of the American Welfare State -- Chapter Six. International Influences and the Expanding American Role -- Chapter Seven. Why Government Must Continue to Grow -- Index -- About the Authors.
Summary: The Rise of Big Government chronicles the phenomenal growth of local, state, and federal government over the last 100 years. The authors explain this growth by arguing that public and social acceptance of government intervention has allowed government to maintain a presence at all levels of the economy. The authors take issue with the opposing argument that government has grown by itself and by the bureaucracy's constant push for its own expansion.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HC106.W15 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1977468 Available EBC1977468

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- List of Tables -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter One. The Erosion of Laissez-Faire -- Chapter Two. The Beginnings of the Mixed Economy, 1930-46 -- Chapter Three. The Postwar Economy and Government Growth -- Chapter Four. Fiscal Policy and Government Growth -- Chapter Five. The Rise of the American Welfare State -- Chapter Six. International Influences and the Expanding American Role -- Chapter Seven. Why Government Must Continue to Grow -- Index -- About the Authors.

The Rise of Big Government chronicles the phenomenal growth of local, state, and federal government over the last 100 years. The authors explain this growth by arguing that public and social acceptance of government intervention has allowed government to maintain a presence at all levels of the economy. The authors take issue with the opposing argument that government has grown by itself and by the bureaucracy's constant push for its own expansion.

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CHOICE Review

Walker and Vatter substantiate an unsurprising viewpoint: "The enormous relative growth of the federal government, which is such a striking part of this century, was driven by four overlapping events: the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the development of the welfare state." A theme in the text is that intervention in the economy is a reflection of the public's demand for "social balance" in the Progressive era and, in the Great Depression, that the economy have a "human face." The middle class has been the force calling for a larger government role: "In those cases in which the evolving market's social impact has been perceived by the community as unsatisfactory, the government has again and again been selected by the affected strata in society to provide an appropriate compensating response." The authors, then, have a perspective consonant with Galbraith's "countervailing power" notion. They trace and develop this theme through chapters on the erosion of laissez-faire, the beginnings of the mixed economy in the 1930s, the culmination of a continuing active government presence in the economy with the Employment Act of 1946, the rise of the welfare state, and international influences that have expanded the federal government's size and role in the economy. Moreover, the authors raise but do not conclusively answer the question of how large a presence the government--federal, state, and local--will or should have in the American economy. The book is competently but not interestingly written. Myriad charts, tables, and accompanying analyses are consistent with the view that, rather than a self-perpetuating Leviathan, the US government's role in the economy has been and will be as large as the public demands it to be. Research and professional collections. R. L. Lucier; Denison University

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