Martin Luther King, Jr..

By: Ling, Peter JMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandRoutledge Historical Biographies: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 2nd edDescription: 1 online resource (415 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317552215Subject(s): African Americans -- Biography | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | Baptists -- United States -- Clergy -- Biography | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights workers -- United States -- Biography | King, Martin Luther, -- Jr., -- 1929-1968Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Martin Luther King, Jr.DDC classification: 323.119607302 LOC classification: E185.97.K5 -- .L564 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Chronology -- 1. Introduction -- Martin And The Movement: A Concise View -- 2. Junior: Becoming Martin Luther King, 1929-55 -- A Family Of Preachers And Race Leaders -- A Member Of Atlanta's Black Elite -- Martin's First Speech And His Experience Of Segregation -- Part Of A New Generation Of African Americans -- Learning A Social Gospel And A Personalist Faith -- Courting Coretta And Returning South -- 3. Loving Your Enemies: Montgomery, 1955-59 -- The Context: Montgomery In The 1950s -- Bus Segregation -- Rosa Parks's Arrest -- King - The Reluctant Leader -- The Counter-Movement Nurtures The Movement -- King Finds His Faith And Preaches Nonviolence -- King And The Larger Stage -- Other Boycotts, Legal Battles, And Scandal -- The Boycott's Uncertain End And SCLC's Shaky Beginning -- Assassination Attempt: King Retreats And Regroups -- 4. Finding His Way, 1960-62 -- The Sit-Ins And Internal Movement Rivalries -- King And The 1960 Election -- The Freedom Rides Of 1961 -- Voting Rights And The Growth Of Civil Rights Field Work -- The Albany Campaign -- Explaining The Albany Defeat -- 5. Let The Children Come To Me: Birmingham, 1963 -- Why Birmingham? -- The Campaign's Timing And Targets -- A Faltering Start -- King In Birmingham Jail -- The Children's Crusade -- Federal Intervention -- King Decides To Settle -- Birmingham's Significance -- White Maneuvers -- 6. Along A Tightrope, 1963-64 -- Before The March: An Ambiguous Summer -- "I Have A Dream" -- After The March: An Autumn Of Horrors -- Helping The Johnson Civil Rights Bill -- Exploiting St. Augustine -- Leaving St. Augustine -- Staying In The Middle: King, Johnson, And The MFDP -- 7. Across A Bridge Of Mistrust: Selma To Montgomery, 1964-65 -- Securing The Right To Vote -- The Threat Of Scandal.
White Selma's Tactical Divisions -- King's Adept Leadership -- Subordinating The Local To The National -- King's Search For "Creative Tension" -- "Bloody Sunday" -- King's Obedience To Federal Law -- The President Joins The Movement -- Movement Divisions Deepen -- The Next Steps Fail: Economic Coercion And Political Organizing -- 8. King's Call: Organizing And Mobilizing Chicago, 1965-66 -- Northern Ghetto Problems -- King's Decision To Go North -- Why Chicago? -- A New Challenge: Organizing Rather Than Mobilizing -- Attempting Too Much With Too Little? -- Without Parallel? -- Unreliable Allies -- King Switches Back To Mobilizing -- The July Riot And King's Despondency -- Confrontations For The Cameras -- Creating A Crisis -- Negotiations Begin -- No National Gains In Prospect -- The Summit Agreement -- A Failure? -- 9. Shrinking Options: "Black Power" And Vietnam, 1966-67 -- "Black Power" -- The Meredith March -- King And "Black Power" -- SCLC's Problems -- Vietnam - King's Initial Vacillation -- King Takes His Stand -- The Riverside Speech -- King For President? -- Note -- 10. Going For Broke: Memphis, 1968 -- Doubts About The PPC -- King's Depression -- The Memphis Strike -- A Disastrous Detour -- King Returns To Memphis -- The Assassination -- Who Killed Martin Luther King? -- The PPC Goes Ahead -- A Mismanaged Campaign -- Assessing King's Later Career -- 11. Epilogue: In Memoriam - Remembering King -- The Making Of King Day -- King's Successors -- Barack Obama -- King's Lasting Significance -- Glossary of Organizations -- Guide to Further Reading -- Select Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: Peter Ling's acclaimed biography of Martin Luther King Jr provides a thorough re-examination of both the man and the Civil Rights Movement, showing how King grew into his leadership role and kept his faith as the challenges facing the movement strengthened after 1965. Ling combines a detailed narrative of Martin Luther King's life with the key historiographical debates surrounding him and places both within the historical context of the Civil Rights Movement. This fully revised and updated second edition includes an extended look at Black Power and a detailed analysis of the memorialization of King since his death, including President Obama's 50th anniversary address, and how conservative spokesmen have tried to appropriate King as an advocate of colour-blindness. Drawing on the wide-ranging and changing scholarship on the Civil Rights Movement, this volume condenses research previously scattered across a larger literature. Peter Ling's crisp and fluent style captures the drama, irony and pathos of King's life and provides an excellent introduction for students and others interested in King, the Civil Rights movement, and America in the 1960s.
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E185.97.K5 -- .L564 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1982478 Available EBC1982478

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Chronology -- 1. Introduction -- Martin And The Movement: A Concise View -- 2. Junior: Becoming Martin Luther King, 1929-55 -- A Family Of Preachers And Race Leaders -- A Member Of Atlanta's Black Elite -- Martin's First Speech And His Experience Of Segregation -- Part Of A New Generation Of African Americans -- Learning A Social Gospel And A Personalist Faith -- Courting Coretta And Returning South -- 3. Loving Your Enemies: Montgomery, 1955-59 -- The Context: Montgomery In The 1950s -- Bus Segregation -- Rosa Parks's Arrest -- King - The Reluctant Leader -- The Counter-Movement Nurtures The Movement -- King Finds His Faith And Preaches Nonviolence -- King And The Larger Stage -- Other Boycotts, Legal Battles, And Scandal -- The Boycott's Uncertain End And SCLC's Shaky Beginning -- Assassination Attempt: King Retreats And Regroups -- 4. Finding His Way, 1960-62 -- The Sit-Ins And Internal Movement Rivalries -- King And The 1960 Election -- The Freedom Rides Of 1961 -- Voting Rights And The Growth Of Civil Rights Field Work -- The Albany Campaign -- Explaining The Albany Defeat -- 5. Let The Children Come To Me: Birmingham, 1963 -- Why Birmingham? -- The Campaign's Timing And Targets -- A Faltering Start -- King In Birmingham Jail -- The Children's Crusade -- Federal Intervention -- King Decides To Settle -- Birmingham's Significance -- White Maneuvers -- 6. Along A Tightrope, 1963-64 -- Before The March: An Ambiguous Summer -- "I Have A Dream" -- After The March: An Autumn Of Horrors -- Helping The Johnson Civil Rights Bill -- Exploiting St. Augustine -- Leaving St. Augustine -- Staying In The Middle: King, Johnson, And The MFDP -- 7. Across A Bridge Of Mistrust: Selma To Montgomery, 1964-65 -- Securing The Right To Vote -- The Threat Of Scandal.

White Selma's Tactical Divisions -- King's Adept Leadership -- Subordinating The Local To The National -- King's Search For "Creative Tension" -- "Bloody Sunday" -- King's Obedience To Federal Law -- The President Joins The Movement -- Movement Divisions Deepen -- The Next Steps Fail: Economic Coercion And Political Organizing -- 8. King's Call: Organizing And Mobilizing Chicago, 1965-66 -- Northern Ghetto Problems -- King's Decision To Go North -- Why Chicago? -- A New Challenge: Organizing Rather Than Mobilizing -- Attempting Too Much With Too Little? -- Without Parallel? -- Unreliable Allies -- King Switches Back To Mobilizing -- The July Riot And King's Despondency -- Confrontations For The Cameras -- Creating A Crisis -- Negotiations Begin -- No National Gains In Prospect -- The Summit Agreement -- A Failure? -- 9. Shrinking Options: "Black Power" And Vietnam, 1966-67 -- "Black Power" -- The Meredith March -- King And "Black Power" -- SCLC's Problems -- Vietnam - King's Initial Vacillation -- King Takes His Stand -- The Riverside Speech -- King For President? -- Note -- 10. Going For Broke: Memphis, 1968 -- Doubts About The PPC -- King's Depression -- The Memphis Strike -- A Disastrous Detour -- King Returns To Memphis -- The Assassination -- Who Killed Martin Luther King? -- The PPC Goes Ahead -- A Mismanaged Campaign -- Assessing King's Later Career -- 11. Epilogue: In Memoriam - Remembering King -- The Making Of King Day -- King's Successors -- Barack Obama -- King's Lasting Significance -- Glossary of Organizations -- Guide to Further Reading -- Select Bibliography -- Index.

Peter Ling's acclaimed biography of Martin Luther King Jr provides a thorough re-examination of both the man and the Civil Rights Movement, showing how King grew into his leadership role and kept his faith as the challenges facing the movement strengthened after 1965. Ling combines a detailed narrative of Martin Luther King's life with the key historiographical debates surrounding him and places both within the historical context of the Civil Rights Movement. This fully revised and updated second edition includes an extended look at Black Power and a detailed analysis of the memorialization of King since his death, including President Obama's 50th anniversary address, and how conservative spokesmen have tried to appropriate King as an advocate of colour-blindness. Drawing on the wide-ranging and changing scholarship on the Civil Rights Movement, this volume condenses research previously scattered across a larger literature. Peter Ling's crisp and fluent style captures the drama, irony and pathos of King's life and provides an excellent introduction for students and others interested in King, the Civil Rights movement, and America in the 1960s.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Peter J. Ling is Professor of American Studies in the Department of American and Canadian Studies at the University of Nottingham. His previous works include the edited collection, Gender and the Civil Rights Movement , (2004), a history of the Democratic Party (2004) and a biography of John F. Kennedy (2013).

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