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Double Burden : Black Women and Everyday Racism.

By: Jean, Yanick St.
Contributor(s): Feagin, Joe R | St Jean, Yanick.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©1999Description: 1 online resource (252 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317472827.Subject(s): African American women -- Social conditions | Race discrimination -- United States | Racism -- United States | United States -- Race relationsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Double Burden: Black Women and Everyday RacismDDC classification: 305 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Preface -- Acknowlegments -- Chapter 1 The Lives of Black Women: Introduction and Overview -- Harsh Representations of Black Women -- Racial Oppression and Stigmatization of Black Women -- Practicing Gendered Discrimination -- Racism at Work -- The "Beauty" of Racism -- The Racist Past and Its Contemporary Legacies -- Fighting Back: An Oppositional Culture -- Voices of Black Women and Men -- Conclusion -- Chapter 2 Black Women at Work -- Racial Discrimination at Work -- White Manipulation: Using Black Women -- Consequences of Racism at Work: Black Families -- Conclusion -- Chapter 3 Black Beauty in a Whitewashed World -- Stigmatizing Black Beauty -- Contradictions and Consequences of Stigmatization -- Fighting Back Successfully -- Beauty Standards and Black Men -- Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Common Myths and Media Images of Black Women -- Myths About African American Women: Sexuality and Attractiveness -- Racial-Sexual Myths and Their Origins -- Other Media Stigmatization of Black Women -- Media Stigmatizing of the African American Family -- Conclusion -- Chapter 5 Distancing White Women -- Racial Conflict in Organizations -- Friction with White Women in Other Settings -- Major Differences Across the Color Line -- Supportive White Women -- Conclusion -- Chapter 6 Black Families: Goals and Responses -- The Extended Family in Black America -- The Many Strengths of Black Families -- Troubles in Families and Communities -- Black Women's Hopes and Goals for Their Families -- Conclusion -- Chapter 7 Motherhood and Families -- The Significance of Motherhood -- A Sense of Control -- Conclusion -- Chapter 8 Finale -- Black Women at Work -- Concepts of Beauty -- Media Portrayals of Black Women -- Black and White Women -- Black Families -- Motherhood -- What We've Learned.
Notes -- Index.
Summary: Studies of contemporary black women are rare and scattered, and are often extensions of a legacy beginning in the 19th century that characterized black women as domineering matriarchs, prostitutes, or welfare queens, negative characterizations that are perpetuated by both white and non-white social scientists. Based on over 200 interviews, this book departs from these conventions in significant ways, and, using a "collective memory" conceptual framework, shows how black women cope with and interpret lives often limited by racial barriers not of their making.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.86 -- .S695 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1982500 Available EBC1982500

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Preface -- Acknowlegments -- Chapter 1 The Lives of Black Women: Introduction and Overview -- Harsh Representations of Black Women -- Racial Oppression and Stigmatization of Black Women -- Practicing Gendered Discrimination -- Racism at Work -- The "Beauty" of Racism -- The Racist Past and Its Contemporary Legacies -- Fighting Back: An Oppositional Culture -- Voices of Black Women and Men -- Conclusion -- Chapter 2 Black Women at Work -- Racial Discrimination at Work -- White Manipulation: Using Black Women -- Consequences of Racism at Work: Black Families -- Conclusion -- Chapter 3 Black Beauty in a Whitewashed World -- Stigmatizing Black Beauty -- Contradictions and Consequences of Stigmatization -- Fighting Back Successfully -- Beauty Standards and Black Men -- Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Common Myths and Media Images of Black Women -- Myths About African American Women: Sexuality and Attractiveness -- Racial-Sexual Myths and Their Origins -- Other Media Stigmatization of Black Women -- Media Stigmatizing of the African American Family -- Conclusion -- Chapter 5 Distancing White Women -- Racial Conflict in Organizations -- Friction with White Women in Other Settings -- Major Differences Across the Color Line -- Supportive White Women -- Conclusion -- Chapter 6 Black Families: Goals and Responses -- The Extended Family in Black America -- The Many Strengths of Black Families -- Troubles in Families and Communities -- Black Women's Hopes and Goals for Their Families -- Conclusion -- Chapter 7 Motherhood and Families -- The Significance of Motherhood -- A Sense of Control -- Conclusion -- Chapter 8 Finale -- Black Women at Work -- Concepts of Beauty -- Media Portrayals of Black Women -- Black and White Women -- Black Families -- Motherhood -- What We've Learned.

Notes -- Index.

Studies of contemporary black women are rare and scattered, and are often extensions of a legacy beginning in the 19th century that characterized black women as domineering matriarchs, prostitutes, or welfare queens, negative characterizations that are perpetuated by both white and non-white social scientists. Based on over 200 interviews, this book departs from these conventions in significant ways, and, using a "collective memory" conceptual framework, shows how black women cope with and interpret lives often limited by racial barriers not of their making.

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