Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Leader Symbols and Personality Cult in North Korea : The Leader State.

By: Lim, Jae-Cheon.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Advances in Korean Studies: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (151 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317567417.Subject(s): Heads of state -- Korea (North) | Kim, Il-sŏng, -- 1912-1994 | Personality -- Political aspects -- Korea (North) | Political leadership -- Korea (North)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Leader Symbols and Personality Cult in North Korea : The Leader StateDDC classification: 324.22095193 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- List of abbreviations -- 1. Leader symbols in North Korea -- 2. Leader symbols, the cult, and its impact on political succession -- 3. Myth- and ritual-making in Kim Il Sung's anti-Japanese struggle -- 4. The Kims: image-making -- 5. Symbolic leadership: the leader's guidance tour as a symbolic act -- 6. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: The legitimacy of the North Korean state is based solely on the leaders' personal legitimacy, and is maintained by the indoctrination of people with leader symbols and the enactment of leadership cults in daily life. It can thus be dubbed a "leader state". The frequency of leader symbols and the richness and scale of leader-symbol-making in North Korea are simply unrivalled. Furthermore, the personality cults of North Korean leaders are central to people's daily activity, critically affecting their minds and emotions. Both leader symbols and cult activities are profoundly entrenched in the institutions and daily life, and if separated and cancelled, the North Korean state would be transformed. This book analyses North Korea as a "leader state", focusing on two elements, leader symbols and cult activities. It argues that these elements have been, and continue to be, the backbone of North Korea, shaping North Korean culture. To reveal the "leader state" character, the book specifically examines North Korea's leadership cults, its use of leader symbols in these cults, and the nature of the symbolism involved. How has the North Korean state developed the cult of the Kim Il Sung family? How does the state use leader symbols to perpetuate this cult? How has the state developed myths and rituals that sustain the cult in daily life? What leader images has state propaganda manufactured? How does the state's manipulation of leader symbols affect the symbolism that is assigned to the leader's actions? In answering these questions, this book sheds new light on the strength and resilience of the North Korean state, and shows how it has been able to survive even the most difficult economic period of the mid-1990s. Leader Symbols and Personality Cult in North Korea will be essential reading for students and scholars of North Korea, Korean politics, AsianSummary: politics, political sociology and visual politics.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS935.5 -- .L554 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1987327 Available EBC1987327

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- List of abbreviations -- 1. Leader symbols in North Korea -- 2. Leader symbols, the cult, and its impact on political succession -- 3. Myth- and ritual-making in Kim Il Sung's anti-Japanese struggle -- 4. The Kims: image-making -- 5. Symbolic leadership: the leader's guidance tour as a symbolic act -- 6. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index.

The legitimacy of the North Korean state is based solely on the leaders' personal legitimacy, and is maintained by the indoctrination of people with leader symbols and the enactment of leadership cults in daily life. It can thus be dubbed a "leader state". The frequency of leader symbols and the richness and scale of leader-symbol-making in North Korea are simply unrivalled. Furthermore, the personality cults of North Korean leaders are central to people's daily activity, critically affecting their minds and emotions. Both leader symbols and cult activities are profoundly entrenched in the institutions and daily life, and if separated and cancelled, the North Korean state would be transformed. This book analyses North Korea as a "leader state", focusing on two elements, leader symbols and cult activities. It argues that these elements have been, and continue to be, the backbone of North Korea, shaping North Korean culture. To reveal the "leader state" character, the book specifically examines North Korea's leadership cults, its use of leader symbols in these cults, and the nature of the symbolism involved. How has the North Korean state developed the cult of the Kim Il Sung family? How does the state use leader symbols to perpetuate this cult? How has the state developed myths and rituals that sustain the cult in daily life? What leader images has state propaganda manufactured? How does the state's manipulation of leader symbols affect the symbolism that is assigned to the leader's actions? In answering these questions, this book sheds new light on the strength and resilience of the North Korean state, and shows how it has been able to survive even the most difficult economic period of the mid-1990s. Leader Symbols and Personality Cult in North Korea will be essential reading for students and scholars of North Korea, Korean politics, Asian

politics, political sociology and visual politics.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lim (Korea Univ., South Korea) explores North Korea as a "leader state" by investigating its leader symbols and cult activities. The author contends that the personality cults of leaders are vital to North Koreans' daily lives and are strongly embedded in their institutions. Specifically, Lim examines the historical development of the Kim family cult and the state's validation of hereditary succession, the mythmaking and ritual making in Kim Il Sung's anti-Japanese struggle, the image making of the Kims, and the leader's guidance tour as a symbolic act. As an academic from South Korea, the author sheds some light on the secretive, enigmatic world of North Korean leaders. This scholarly monograph provides a thorough analysis of the interesting topic of the personality cult in North Korea but could have made good use of examples and illustrations for explanation and corroboration. Of interest to students and scholars of North Korea studies, Korean politics, visual politics, and East Asian studies in general. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Xiaofei Li, York College of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Jae-Cheon Lim is Associate Professor in the Department of North Korean Studies at Korea University, South Korea.</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.