News and Politics : The Rise of Live and Interpretive Journalism.

By: Cushion, StephenMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandCommunication and Society: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (195 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317540533Subject(s): Broadcast journalism -- Political aspects | Television broadcasting of news -- Great Britain | Television broadcasting of newsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: News and Politics : The Rise of Live and Interpretive JournalismDDC classification: 070.195 LOC classification: PN4784.T4 -- .C873 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of Figures and Tables -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction: From mediation to mediatization -- Television news, politics and media logic(s) -- Scope of the study -- Note -- 1. Interpreting news conventions as journalistic interventions: Exploring the changing nature of television journalism and political reporting -- Introduction -- The birth and evolution of television news: establishing routine conventions on evening bulletins -- Entering into mediatization debates: interpreting competing media logics -- Methodological framework for studying fixed time bulletins and political reporting: interpreting journalistic interventionism -- Note -- 2. Embracing or resisting a rolling news logic? Understanding the changing character of television news bulletins -- Introduction -- Interpreting the changing nature of television news bulletins over time -- Understanding the form, structure and style of television news bulletins -- The rise of live news and immediacy in political reporting -- Interpreting mediatization and the logic of rolling news -- Notes -- 3. The media logic of immediacy: The mediatization of politics in UK news bulletins -- Introduction -- Mediatization of politics debates: context and method -- The mediatization of politics in edited news conventions: from soundbites and imagebites to journalistic visibility -- Interpreting the mediatization of news: enhancing the speed and liveness of political reporting? -- Understanding the mediatization of politics: towards a live and interpretive media logic -- 4. Comparing news cultures and media systems: Developing a comparative study of television news bulletins in the UK, US and Norway -- Introduction -- Developing comparative research: interpreting television news cross-nationally.
Interpreting the mediatization of television news cross-nationally: the use of journalistic interventions -- Comparing levels of mediatization in television journalism: political reporting in US and UK evening news bulletins -- Comparing the structure, form and style of television news bulletins in the US and UK -- The influence of 24-hour news culture: towards a rolling news logic in evening bulletins -- Note -- 5. The rise of live news and the two-way convention: Evaluating the value of journalistic interventionism -- Introduction -- Understanding broadcast talk: scholarly readings of the live two-way convention -- Comparing edited and live news: towards a better understanding of politics? -- Assessing the value and purpose of live two-ways in political reporting -- Notes -- 6. Interpreting the impact and consequences of the mediatization of news and politics -- Introduction -- Enhancing the mediatization of news and journalistic interventionism: assessing longitudinal trends and differences between media systems -- Live two-ways and the mediatization of politics: enhancing knowledge and understanding? -- Towards a mediatized future in news and political reporting? Understanding and interpreting new logics -- 7. Interpreting 24/7 journalism on new content and social media platforms: The online challenges and future directions of news and politics -- Introduction -- Reflecting the rhythms and routines of 24-hour society? Understanding the instant culture of news consumption -- Communicating news on cross-media content platforms: interpreting the role and value of journalists in the online world -- References -- Index.
Summary: News and Politics critically examines television news bulletins - still the primary source of information for most people - and asks whether the wider pace and immediacy of 24-hour news culture has influenced their format and style over time. Drawing on the concepts of mediatization and journalistic interventionism, Stephen Cushion empirically traces the shift from edited to live reporting from a cross-national perspective, focussing on the two-way convention in political coverage and the more interpretive approach to journalism it promotes. Challenging prevailing academic wisdom, Cushion argues that the mediatization of news does not necessarily reflect a commercial logic or a lowering of journalism standards. In particular, the rise of live two-ways can potentially enhance viewers' understanding of public affairs - moving reporters beyond their visual backdrops and reliance on political soundbites - by asking journalists to scrutinize the actions of political elites, interpret competing source claims and to explain the broader context to everyday stories. Considering the future of 24-hour news, a final discussion asks whether new content and social media platforms - including Twitter and Buzzfeed - enhance or weaken democratic culture. This timely analysis of News and Politics is ideal for students of political communication and journalism studies, as well as communication studies, media studies, and political science.
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Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of Figures and Tables -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction: From mediation to mediatization -- Television news, politics and media logic(s) -- Scope of the study -- Note -- 1. Interpreting news conventions as journalistic interventions: Exploring the changing nature of television journalism and political reporting -- Introduction -- The birth and evolution of television news: establishing routine conventions on evening bulletins -- Entering into mediatization debates: interpreting competing media logics -- Methodological framework for studying fixed time bulletins and political reporting: interpreting journalistic interventionism -- Note -- 2. Embracing or resisting a rolling news logic? Understanding the changing character of television news bulletins -- Introduction -- Interpreting the changing nature of television news bulletins over time -- Understanding the form, structure and style of television news bulletins -- The rise of live news and immediacy in political reporting -- Interpreting mediatization and the logic of rolling news -- Notes -- 3. The media logic of immediacy: The mediatization of politics in UK news bulletins -- Introduction -- Mediatization of politics debates: context and method -- The mediatization of politics in edited news conventions: from soundbites and imagebites to journalistic visibility -- Interpreting the mediatization of news: enhancing the speed and liveness of political reporting? -- Understanding the mediatization of politics: towards a live and interpretive media logic -- 4. Comparing news cultures and media systems: Developing a comparative study of television news bulletins in the UK, US and Norway -- Introduction -- Developing comparative research: interpreting television news cross-nationally.

Interpreting the mediatization of television news cross-nationally: the use of journalistic interventions -- Comparing levels of mediatization in television journalism: political reporting in US and UK evening news bulletins -- Comparing the structure, form and style of television news bulletins in the US and UK -- The influence of 24-hour news culture: towards a rolling news logic in evening bulletins -- Note -- 5. The rise of live news and the two-way convention: Evaluating the value of journalistic interventionism -- Introduction -- Understanding broadcast talk: scholarly readings of the live two-way convention -- Comparing edited and live news: towards a better understanding of politics? -- Assessing the value and purpose of live two-ways in political reporting -- Notes -- 6. Interpreting the impact and consequences of the mediatization of news and politics -- Introduction -- Enhancing the mediatization of news and journalistic interventionism: assessing longitudinal trends and differences between media systems -- Live two-ways and the mediatization of politics: enhancing knowledge and understanding? -- Towards a mediatized future in news and political reporting? Understanding and interpreting new logics -- 7. Interpreting 24/7 journalism on new content and social media platforms: The online challenges and future directions of news and politics -- Introduction -- Reflecting the rhythms and routines of 24-hour society? Understanding the instant culture of news consumption -- Communicating news on cross-media content platforms: interpreting the role and value of journalists in the online world -- References -- Index.

News and Politics critically examines television news bulletins - still the primary source of information for most people - and asks whether the wider pace and immediacy of 24-hour news culture has influenced their format and style over time. Drawing on the concepts of mediatization and journalistic interventionism, Stephen Cushion empirically traces the shift from edited to live reporting from a cross-national perspective, focussing on the two-way convention in political coverage and the more interpretive approach to journalism it promotes. Challenging prevailing academic wisdom, Cushion argues that the mediatization of news does not necessarily reflect a commercial logic or a lowering of journalism standards. In particular, the rise of live two-ways can potentially enhance viewers' understanding of public affairs - moving reporters beyond their visual backdrops and reliance on political soundbites - by asking journalists to scrutinize the actions of political elites, interpret competing source claims and to explain the broader context to everyday stories. Considering the future of 24-hour news, a final discussion asks whether new content and social media platforms - including Twitter and Buzzfeed - enhance or weaken democratic culture. This timely analysis of News and Politics is ideal for students of political communication and journalism studies, as well as communication studies, media studies, and political science.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Stephen Cushion is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, Cardiff University. He is sole author of The Democratic Value of News: Why Public Service Media Matter (2012) and Television Journalism (2012), and co-editor of (with Justin Lewis) The Rise of 24-Hour News Television: Global Perspectives (2010) and (with Richard Sambrook) The Future of 24-Hour News: New Directions, New Challenges (2016).

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