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Power and Crime.

By: Ruggiero, Vincenzo.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.New Directions in Critical Criminology: Publisher: London : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (183 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317647393.Subject(s): Crime -- Sociological aspects | Critical criminology | Power (Social sciences)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Power and CrimeDDC classification: 364.01 LOC classification: HV6025 -- .R84 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A criminological classification -- Power crimes -- State agents and economic actors -- Anomie, control and techniques of neutralization -- Organizations and their members -- The legal-illegal continuum -- A provisional classification -- Conclusion -- 3. Fearing the future -- Ethical communion and unethical aggregations -- Markets vs. communities -- Durable formations and domination -- Romantic pluralism -- Latent functions and choice -- Locating power and its crimes -- Economic power, social norms and herd behaviour -- Conclusion -- 4. The law of power -- Justice and consensus -- Law as fraud -- Insatiability and the rules of exception -- Homo juridicus and homo oeconomicus -- Law and action -- Having it both ways: knights and bullies -- 5. Domination, hegemony and violence -- The polis of the elite -- The polis of God -- Power as contract -- Between reason and passion -- Imperatives and superstructure -- Ideology vs. science? -- Anti-humanism -- Politics, violence, death -- Conclusion -- 6. Inglorious human activities -- Goods and 'bads' -- On justification -- Needs and tolerance -- Codes and secrecy -- Self-determination and juvenile fury -- 7. The ethics of power -- Virtue and passion -- From Pascal to Machiavelli -- Values as illusions -- Values as socio-biological processes -- Habit, opportunities and trust -- The privatization of morality -- Conclusion -- 8. Balzac: power as crime -- Ruthlessness -- Petty and grand -- Fatherly love -- A criminal criminologist -- The ball of spectres -- A constellation of interests -- 9. Conclusion -- References -- Index.
Summary: This book provides an analysis of the two concepts of power and crime and posits that criminologists can learn more about these concepts by incorporating ideas from disciplines outside of criminology. Although arguably a 'rendezvous' discipline, Vincenzo Ruggiero argues that criminology can gain much insight from other fields such as the political sciences, ethics, social theory, critical legal studies, economic theory, and classical literature. In this book Ruggiero offers an authoritative synthesis of a range of intellectual conceptions of crime and power, drawing on the works and theories of classical, as well as contemporary thinkers, in the above fields of knowledge, arguing that criminology can 'humbly' renounce claims to intellectual independence and adopt notions and perspectives from other disciplines. The theories presented locate the crimes of the powerful in different disciplinary contexts and make the book essential reading for academics and students involved in the study of criminology, sociology, law, politics and philosophy.
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HV6025 -- .R84 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=2005393 Available EBC2005393

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A criminological classification -- Power crimes -- State agents and economic actors -- Anomie, control and techniques of neutralization -- Organizations and their members -- The legal-illegal continuum -- A provisional classification -- Conclusion -- 3. Fearing the future -- Ethical communion and unethical aggregations -- Markets vs. communities -- Durable formations and domination -- Romantic pluralism -- Latent functions and choice -- Locating power and its crimes -- Economic power, social norms and herd behaviour -- Conclusion -- 4. The law of power -- Justice and consensus -- Law as fraud -- Insatiability and the rules of exception -- Homo juridicus and homo oeconomicus -- Law and action -- Having it both ways: knights and bullies -- 5. Domination, hegemony and violence -- The polis of the elite -- The polis of God -- Power as contract -- Between reason and passion -- Imperatives and superstructure -- Ideology vs. science? -- Anti-humanism -- Politics, violence, death -- Conclusion -- 6. Inglorious human activities -- Goods and 'bads' -- On justification -- Needs and tolerance -- Codes and secrecy -- Self-determination and juvenile fury -- 7. The ethics of power -- Virtue and passion -- From Pascal to Machiavelli -- Values as illusions -- Values as socio-biological processes -- Habit, opportunities and trust -- The privatization of morality -- Conclusion -- 8. Balzac: power as crime -- Ruthlessness -- Petty and grand -- Fatherly love -- A criminal criminologist -- The ball of spectres -- A constellation of interests -- 9. Conclusion -- References -- Index.

This book provides an analysis of the two concepts of power and crime and posits that criminologists can learn more about these concepts by incorporating ideas from disciplines outside of criminology. Although arguably a 'rendezvous' discipline, Vincenzo Ruggiero argues that criminology can gain much insight from other fields such as the political sciences, ethics, social theory, critical legal studies, economic theory, and classical literature. In this book Ruggiero offers an authoritative synthesis of a range of intellectual conceptions of crime and power, drawing on the works and theories of classical, as well as contemporary thinkers, in the above fields of knowledge, arguing that criminology can 'humbly' renounce claims to intellectual independence and adopt notions and perspectives from other disciplines. The theories presented locate the crimes of the powerful in different disciplinary contexts and make the book essential reading for academics and students involved in the study of criminology, sociology, law, politics and philosophy.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Sociologist Ruggiero (Middlesex Univ., London) admits that this particular book may not be best suited for the "New Directions in Critical Criminology" franchise, emphasis on "new." Invoking the names of 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century theorists, even resurrecting Aristotle in the mix, hardly places this book in the "new" realm. However, as the subject matter is the connection between powerful individuals or groups and crime, it is tricky to point to a new direction to study the topic of elite crime. As the author points out, the perpetrator and sometimes the victims themselves may be invisible, as many times there is no connection between the crime and when it is detected as being a criminal act. Better yet, Ruggiero is quick to note that the elite groups from which these crimes might emerge may not identify the acts as criminal, but rather view the marginally offensive behavior as "business as usual." Offering a nice blend of economics, sociology, and ethics, Ruggiero manages to provide not only an interesting discourse on universal theories of elite crimes, but also a tightly packaged book on the subject of power in general, wasting no words in the process. Of interest to criminologists studying white-collar crime, as well as scholars focused on studying the power elite. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. --Laura Lynn Hansen, Western New England University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Vincenzo Ruggiero is Professor of Sociology at Middlesex University in London. He has conducted research on behalf of many national and international agencies, including the Economic and Social Research Council, the European Commission and the United Nations. He has published extensively on illicit economies, corporate crime and corruption, penal systems, social movements, fiction and crime. His latest book is The Crimes of the Economy (2013).</p>

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