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Means of Transportation and Registration of Nationality : Transportation Registered by International Organizations.

By: P. Cogliati-Bantz, Vincent.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Research in International Law: Publisher: London : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (305 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317804512.Subject(s): International agencies | International organization | TransportationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Means of Transportation and Registration of Nationality : Transportation Registered by International OrganizationsDDC classification: 343.093 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- PART ONE The nationality of means of transportation -- 1 Nationality as jurisdictional link -- 1 Jurisdiction in international law -- 1.1 Basic issues: subjects and objects of jurisdiction -- 1.2 Nature of jurisdiction -- 1.3 Bases of jurisdiction: phenomenology of jurisdiction -- 1.3.1 Jurisdictional links and their creation: basic distinction -- 1.3.2 Bases of jurisdiction -- 1.3.2.1 Territorial principle and territorial jurisdiction -- 1.3.2.2 Nationality principle and personal jurisdiction -- 1.3.2.3 Organic principle -- 1.3.2.4 Protective principle -- 1.3.2.5 Universality principle -- 2 Nationality of means of transportation as jurisdictional link -- 2.1 Ships -- 2.1.1 Definition -- 2.1.2 Nationality of ships -- 2.1.3 Jurisdictional nature of nationality -- 2.2 Aircraft -- 2.2.1 Definition -- 2.2.2 Nationality of aircraft -- 2.2.3 Jurisdictional nature of nationality -- 2.3 Spacecraft -- 2.3.1 Definition -- 2.3.2 Nationality of spacecraft -- 2.3.3 Jurisdictional nature of nationality -- 2.4 Motor vehicles -- 2.4.1 No nationality for motor vehicles -- 2.4.2 Jurisdictional nature of registration (identification) -- 2 Nationality of transport: basic rules -- 1 Single or multiple nationality? -- 1.1 Ships -- 1.2 Aircraft -- 1.3 Spacecraft -- 1.4 Motor vehicles -- 2 Conferral of nationality -- 2.1 Compulsory registration? -- 2.1.1 The concept of registration -- 2.1.2 Grant of nationality to, and registration of, ships -- 2.1.3 Grant of nationality to, and registration of, aircraft -- 2.1.4 Grant of nationality to, and registration of, spacecraft -- 2.1.5 Registration of motor vehicles -- 2.1.6 Clarification on the term 'registration' in this book -- 2.2 Substantive conditions under international law: issues of 'genuine link' -- 2.2.1 Ships -- 2.2.2 Aircraft.
2.2.3 Spacecraft -- 2.2.4 Motor vehicles -- 3 Terminological clarifications -- 3.1 Grant and proof of nationality -- 3.2 Flag, documents, registration number, marks -- 3.2.1 Ships -- 3.2.2 Aircraft -- 3.2.3 Spacecraft -- 3.2.4 Motor vehicles -- PART TWO Registration by international organizations -- 3 Source of the right to register in the external legal order of international organizations -- 1 Scope of enquiry -- 2 Ships -- 2.1 Treaties -- 2.1.1 The Law of the Sea conventions -- 2.1.1.1 The work of the International Law Commission -- 2.1.1.2 The Convention on the High Seas: Article 7 -- 2.1.1.3 The UNCLOS (1): Article 93 -- 2.1.1.4 Analysis -- 2.1.1.5 The UNCLOS (2): Annex IX -- 2.1.2 Selected agreements similar to Annex IX -- 2.1.2.1 Conventions on pollution of the marine environment -- 2.1.2.2 Conventions on fisheries management -- 2.1.3 Convention on the Liability of Operators of Nuclear Ships -- 2.1.4 Conclusion -- 2.2 Custom -- 2.2.1 Instances of practice -- 2.2.1.1 Practice necessarily discounted -- 2.2.1.2 The flag of Jerusalem -- 2.2.1.3 The Korean trawlers -- 2.2.1.4 The Landing Craft Mechanized -- 2.2.1.5 Potential practice -- 2.2.1.5.1 Red Cross flotilla -- 2.2.1.5.2 Nuclear ships and UNESCO enquiries -- 2.2.2 Analysis -- 2.2.2.1 Value of practice -- 2.2.2.2 The problem of opinio juris -- 2.3 General principles of law -- 2.4 Conclusion -- 3 Aircraft -- 3.1 Treaties -- 3.1.1 The 1919 Convention -- 3.1.2 The Chicago Convention: Article 77 -- 3.1.2.1 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) determinations -- 3.1.2.2 Analysis -- 3.1.3 Other treaties -- 3.1.4 Conclusion -- 3.2 Custom -- 3.2.1 Practice -- 3.2.1.1 Enquiries by the ILC -- 3.2.1.2 Aircraft in Korea -- 3.2.1.3 Aircraft in the Congo -- 3.2.2 Value of practice and opinio juris -- 3.3 General principles of law -- 3.4 Conclusion -- 4 Spacecraft -- 4.1 The space treaties.
4.1.1 The Outer Space Treaty -- 4.1.1.1 Relevant provisions -- 4.1.1.2 Registration by international organizations -- 4.1.2 The Registration Convention -- 4.1.2.1 Adoption of the principles in the Rescue Agreement and the Liability Convention -- 4.1.2.2 International organizations in the Registration Convention -- 4.1.3 Analysis -- 4.1.4 Subsequent practice -- 4.1.4.1 The European Space Agency -- 4.1.4.2 The European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites -- 4.1.4.3 The European Telecommunications Satellite Intergovernmental Organization -- 4.1.5 Conclusion -- 4.2 Custom -- 4.2.1 Value of UN resolutions -- 4.2.1.1 Position of States -- 4.2.1.2 The position of international organizations -- 4.2.2 Practice -- 4.2.3 Value of practice and opinio juris -- 4.2.4 Conclusion -- 4.3 General principles of law -- 4.4 Conclusions -- 5 Motor vehicles: Reference to later enquiry -- 4 Source of the right to register in the internal order of international organizations -- 1 Scope of enquiry -- 2 International personality as a necessary condition -- 2.1 Conferral of nationality -- 2.2 Whether sovereignty is necessary for the conferral of nationality -- 2.2.1 Arguments that only States may register means of transport -- 2.2.2 Non-sovereign States and nationality issues -- 2.2.3 International organizations and sovereign powers -- 2.2.4 Sovereignty insufficient -- 2.2.5 Conclusion -- 2.3 International organizations as subjects of international law -- 3 International personality as a sufficient condition? -- 3.1 Are there rights inherent in international personality? -- 3.2 Registration of means of transportation -- 3.3 Conclusion -- 4 Registration of means of transportation as a power of international organizations -- 4.1 Preliminary assessment: opinion of writers -- 4.1.1 Writers who are in favour of the right to register.
4.1.1.1 Arguments based on accumulation of factors -- 4.1.1.2 Specific arguments based on the powers of international organizations -- 4.1.1.3 Specific arguments based on the international personality of international organizations -- 4.1.2 Writers who are generally against the right to register -- 4.1.3 Indeterminate proposals -- 4.2 Registration as expressed power -- 4.3 Registration as included power -- 4.4 Registration as implied power -- 4.4.1 Implication from expressed powers -- 4.4.2 Implication from purposes -- 4.4.3 Implication from an external source -- 4.4.4 The principles of speciality and functional necessity defined -- 4.4.4.1 Purposes, functions, duties, powers -- 4.4.4.2 Necessity -- 4.4.4.3 Registration as a necessary power -- 4.4.4.4 Voluntas organisationis -- 4.5 Determination of functional necessity -- 4.5.1 Relations with Member States -- 4.5.2 Relations with third States -- 4.6 Categories and capacities of international organizations -- 5 The case of other subjects of international law -- 5.1 General -- 5.2 The Holy See -- 5.3 The Order of Malta -- 5.4 The ICRC -- PART THREE The legal regime of registration of means of transportation by international organizations -- 5 Preliminary study: internationalized means of transportation -- 1 Categories of jurisdictional links: necessary distinctions -- 2 Means of transportation not registered by the organization but performing a mission for it: internationalized means of transportation -- 2.1 Practice -- 2.1.1 The European Commission of the Danube -- 2.1.2 Humanitarian organizations -- 2.1.2.1 The Order of Malta -- 2.1.2.2 The Red Cross -- 2.1.2.3 The International Refugee Organization and the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration -- 2.1.3 The United Nations -- 2.1.3.1 UN organs -- 2.1.3.1.1 Peacekeeping -- 2.1.3.1.2 Other operations -- 2.1.3.1.3 Other uses.
2.1.3.2 Specialized agencies -- 2.1.4 Other international organizations -- 2.1.4.1 European Union -- 2.1.4.2 NATO -- 2.1.4.3 Other cases -- 3 Internationalized objects: selected issues -- 3.1 Meaning of the sign -- 3.2 Law applicable -- 3.3 Immunities -- 3.4 Protection -- 3.5 International responsibility -- 6 Transportation registered by international organizations -- 1 Means of transportation registered -- 2 Registration and use on official service -- 2.1 Ownership by the organization -- 2.2 Transportation made available to the organization -- 3 International registration of transportation: selected questions -- 3.1 Creation of international registration -- 3.1.1 International registry -- 3.1.2 Indicators of international registration -- 3.2 Jurisdiction and control -- 3.2.1 General -- 3.2.2 Prescriptive jurisdiction -- 3.2.2.1 Necessary regulations -- 3.2.2.1.1 Adoption of rules by the organization -- 3.2.2.1.2 Designation of State rules by the organization -- 3.2.2.2 Adoption of optional rules by the organization -- 3.2.3 Enforcement jurisdiction -- 3.2.3.1 The organization establishes its own courts -- 3.2.3.2 The organization designates national courts -- 3.2.3.3 Enforcement mechanisms and personnel -- 3.2.4 Special issues -- 3.2.4.1 Protection of the means of transportation -- 3.2.4.2 Immunities -- 3.2.4.3 International responsibility -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: This book examines the concept of nationality of means of transportation in terms of jurisdiction in international law. It reassesses the definition of nationality and explores how it is conferred. The book first places nationality in the broader perspective of jurisdiction in international law, and examines the historical development and necessity of the nationality of means of transportation. It goes on to investigate whether and under which conditions international organizations may confer a 'nationality' on means of transportation, examining the law of the sea conventions and air and space treaties. The book finally explores several questions relating to international registration of means of transportation, building a regime of international registration. Vincent Cogliati-Bantz introduces a necessary distinction between transport internationally registered and transport registered in a State but fulfilling a mission for an international organization. As a work that proposes the ability for international organisations to access international spaces without reliance on State-registered means of transport, this book will be of great use and interest to scholars and students of public international law, international organisations, and maritime, space, and aviation law.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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KZ4850 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=2057968 Available EBC2057968

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- PART ONE The nationality of means of transportation -- 1 Nationality as jurisdictional link -- 1 Jurisdiction in international law -- 1.1 Basic issues: subjects and objects of jurisdiction -- 1.2 Nature of jurisdiction -- 1.3 Bases of jurisdiction: phenomenology of jurisdiction -- 1.3.1 Jurisdictional links and their creation: basic distinction -- 1.3.2 Bases of jurisdiction -- 1.3.2.1 Territorial principle and territorial jurisdiction -- 1.3.2.2 Nationality principle and personal jurisdiction -- 1.3.2.3 Organic principle -- 1.3.2.4 Protective principle -- 1.3.2.5 Universality principle -- 2 Nationality of means of transportation as jurisdictional link -- 2.1 Ships -- 2.1.1 Definition -- 2.1.2 Nationality of ships -- 2.1.3 Jurisdictional nature of nationality -- 2.2 Aircraft -- 2.2.1 Definition -- 2.2.2 Nationality of aircraft -- 2.2.3 Jurisdictional nature of nationality -- 2.3 Spacecraft -- 2.3.1 Definition -- 2.3.2 Nationality of spacecraft -- 2.3.3 Jurisdictional nature of nationality -- 2.4 Motor vehicles -- 2.4.1 No nationality for motor vehicles -- 2.4.2 Jurisdictional nature of registration (identification) -- 2 Nationality of transport: basic rules -- 1 Single or multiple nationality? -- 1.1 Ships -- 1.2 Aircraft -- 1.3 Spacecraft -- 1.4 Motor vehicles -- 2 Conferral of nationality -- 2.1 Compulsory registration? -- 2.1.1 The concept of registration -- 2.1.2 Grant of nationality to, and registration of, ships -- 2.1.3 Grant of nationality to, and registration of, aircraft -- 2.1.4 Grant of nationality to, and registration of, spacecraft -- 2.1.5 Registration of motor vehicles -- 2.1.6 Clarification on the term 'registration' in this book -- 2.2 Substantive conditions under international law: issues of 'genuine link' -- 2.2.1 Ships -- 2.2.2 Aircraft.

2.2.3 Spacecraft -- 2.2.4 Motor vehicles -- 3 Terminological clarifications -- 3.1 Grant and proof of nationality -- 3.2 Flag, documents, registration number, marks -- 3.2.1 Ships -- 3.2.2 Aircraft -- 3.2.3 Spacecraft -- 3.2.4 Motor vehicles -- PART TWO Registration by international organizations -- 3 Source of the right to register in the external legal order of international organizations -- 1 Scope of enquiry -- 2 Ships -- 2.1 Treaties -- 2.1.1 The Law of the Sea conventions -- 2.1.1.1 The work of the International Law Commission -- 2.1.1.2 The Convention on the High Seas: Article 7 -- 2.1.1.3 The UNCLOS (1): Article 93 -- 2.1.1.4 Analysis -- 2.1.1.5 The UNCLOS (2): Annex IX -- 2.1.2 Selected agreements similar to Annex IX -- 2.1.2.1 Conventions on pollution of the marine environment -- 2.1.2.2 Conventions on fisheries management -- 2.1.3 Convention on the Liability of Operators of Nuclear Ships -- 2.1.4 Conclusion -- 2.2 Custom -- 2.2.1 Instances of practice -- 2.2.1.1 Practice necessarily discounted -- 2.2.1.2 The flag of Jerusalem -- 2.2.1.3 The Korean trawlers -- 2.2.1.4 The Landing Craft Mechanized -- 2.2.1.5 Potential practice -- 2.2.1.5.1 Red Cross flotilla -- 2.2.1.5.2 Nuclear ships and UNESCO enquiries -- 2.2.2 Analysis -- 2.2.2.1 Value of practice -- 2.2.2.2 The problem of opinio juris -- 2.3 General principles of law -- 2.4 Conclusion -- 3 Aircraft -- 3.1 Treaties -- 3.1.1 The 1919 Convention -- 3.1.2 The Chicago Convention: Article 77 -- 3.1.2.1 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) determinations -- 3.1.2.2 Analysis -- 3.1.3 Other treaties -- 3.1.4 Conclusion -- 3.2 Custom -- 3.2.1 Practice -- 3.2.1.1 Enquiries by the ILC -- 3.2.1.2 Aircraft in Korea -- 3.2.1.3 Aircraft in the Congo -- 3.2.2 Value of practice and opinio juris -- 3.3 General principles of law -- 3.4 Conclusion -- 4 Spacecraft -- 4.1 The space treaties.

4.1.1 The Outer Space Treaty -- 4.1.1.1 Relevant provisions -- 4.1.1.2 Registration by international organizations -- 4.1.2 The Registration Convention -- 4.1.2.1 Adoption of the principles in the Rescue Agreement and the Liability Convention -- 4.1.2.2 International organizations in the Registration Convention -- 4.1.3 Analysis -- 4.1.4 Subsequent practice -- 4.1.4.1 The European Space Agency -- 4.1.4.2 The European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites -- 4.1.4.3 The European Telecommunications Satellite Intergovernmental Organization -- 4.1.5 Conclusion -- 4.2 Custom -- 4.2.1 Value of UN resolutions -- 4.2.1.1 Position of States -- 4.2.1.2 The position of international organizations -- 4.2.2 Practice -- 4.2.3 Value of practice and opinio juris -- 4.2.4 Conclusion -- 4.3 General principles of law -- 4.4 Conclusions -- 5 Motor vehicles: Reference to later enquiry -- 4 Source of the right to register in the internal order of international organizations -- 1 Scope of enquiry -- 2 International personality as a necessary condition -- 2.1 Conferral of nationality -- 2.2 Whether sovereignty is necessary for the conferral of nationality -- 2.2.1 Arguments that only States may register means of transport -- 2.2.2 Non-sovereign States and nationality issues -- 2.2.3 International organizations and sovereign powers -- 2.2.4 Sovereignty insufficient -- 2.2.5 Conclusion -- 2.3 International organizations as subjects of international law -- 3 International personality as a sufficient condition? -- 3.1 Are there rights inherent in international personality? -- 3.2 Registration of means of transportation -- 3.3 Conclusion -- 4 Registration of means of transportation as a power of international organizations -- 4.1 Preliminary assessment: opinion of writers -- 4.1.1 Writers who are in favour of the right to register.

4.1.1.1 Arguments based on accumulation of factors -- 4.1.1.2 Specific arguments based on the powers of international organizations -- 4.1.1.3 Specific arguments based on the international personality of international organizations -- 4.1.2 Writers who are generally against the right to register -- 4.1.3 Indeterminate proposals -- 4.2 Registration as expressed power -- 4.3 Registration as included power -- 4.4 Registration as implied power -- 4.4.1 Implication from expressed powers -- 4.4.2 Implication from purposes -- 4.4.3 Implication from an external source -- 4.4.4 The principles of speciality and functional necessity defined -- 4.4.4.1 Purposes, functions, duties, powers -- 4.4.4.2 Necessity -- 4.4.4.3 Registration as a necessary power -- 4.4.4.4 Voluntas organisationis -- 4.5 Determination of functional necessity -- 4.5.1 Relations with Member States -- 4.5.2 Relations with third States -- 4.6 Categories and capacities of international organizations -- 5 The case of other subjects of international law -- 5.1 General -- 5.2 The Holy See -- 5.3 The Order of Malta -- 5.4 The ICRC -- PART THREE The legal regime of registration of means of transportation by international organizations -- 5 Preliminary study: internationalized means of transportation -- 1 Categories of jurisdictional links: necessary distinctions -- 2 Means of transportation not registered by the organization but performing a mission for it: internationalized means of transportation -- 2.1 Practice -- 2.1.1 The European Commission of the Danube -- 2.1.2 Humanitarian organizations -- 2.1.2.1 The Order of Malta -- 2.1.2.2 The Red Cross -- 2.1.2.3 The International Refugee Organization and the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration -- 2.1.3 The United Nations -- 2.1.3.1 UN organs -- 2.1.3.1.1 Peacekeeping -- 2.1.3.1.2 Other operations -- 2.1.3.1.3 Other uses.

2.1.3.2 Specialized agencies -- 2.1.4 Other international organizations -- 2.1.4.1 European Union -- 2.1.4.2 NATO -- 2.1.4.3 Other cases -- 3 Internationalized objects: selected issues -- 3.1 Meaning of the sign -- 3.2 Law applicable -- 3.3 Immunities -- 3.4 Protection -- 3.5 International responsibility -- 6 Transportation registered by international organizations -- 1 Means of transportation registered -- 2 Registration and use on official service -- 2.1 Ownership by the organization -- 2.2 Transportation made available to the organization -- 3 International registration of transportation: selected questions -- 3.1 Creation of international registration -- 3.1.1 International registry -- 3.1.2 Indicators of international registration -- 3.2 Jurisdiction and control -- 3.2.1 General -- 3.2.2 Prescriptive jurisdiction -- 3.2.2.1 Necessary regulations -- 3.2.2.1.1 Adoption of rules by the organization -- 3.2.2.1.2 Designation of State rules by the organization -- 3.2.2.2 Adoption of optional rules by the organization -- 3.2.3 Enforcement jurisdiction -- 3.2.3.1 The organization establishes its own courts -- 3.2.3.2 The organization designates national courts -- 3.2.3.3 Enforcement mechanisms and personnel -- 3.2.4 Special issues -- 3.2.4.1 Protection of the means of transportation -- 3.2.4.2 Immunities -- 3.2.4.3 International responsibility -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index.

This book examines the concept of nationality of means of transportation in terms of jurisdiction in international law. It reassesses the definition of nationality and explores how it is conferred. The book first places nationality in the broader perspective of jurisdiction in international law, and examines the historical development and necessity of the nationality of means of transportation. It goes on to investigate whether and under which conditions international organizations may confer a 'nationality' on means of transportation, examining the law of the sea conventions and air and space treaties. The book finally explores several questions relating to international registration of means of transportation, building a regime of international registration. Vincent Cogliati-Bantz introduces a necessary distinction between transport internationally registered and transport registered in a State but fulfilling a mission for an international organization. As a work that proposes the ability for international organisations to access international spaces without reliance on State-registered means of transport, this book will be of great use and interest to scholars and students of public international law, international organisations, and maritime, space, and aviation law.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Vincent Cogliati-Bantz is Senior Lecturer at the TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, Australia.

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