Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Autobiography and Questions of Gender.

By: Neuman, Shirley.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Library Editions: Autobiography: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©1991Description: 1 online resource (223 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317377320.Subject(s): American prose literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Autobiography -- Authorship -- Sex differences | Autobiography -- Women authors | Women and literature -- United States | Women authors, American -- Biography -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Autobiography and Questions of GenderDDC classification: 809.9335 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Original Title -- Original Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Autobiography and Questions of Gender: An Introduction -- Auto/Bio/History: Modern Midwifery -- Refracting Selves: Kate Millett's The Basement -- From the Inside Out: Lily Briscoe a Self-Portrait: an autobiography by Mary Meigs -- A Signature of Lesbian Autobiography: "Gertrice/Altrude" -- Women's Autobiography: The Self at Stake? -- Engendered Autobiographies: The Diary as a Feminine Form -- Delivery: The Cultural Re-presentation of Childbirth -- Figuration and Disfigurement: Herculine Barbin and the Autobiography of the Body -- Autobiography, Bodies, Manhood -- Poet and Patriarch in Maxine Hong Kingston's China Men -- The Autobiographical Manifesto: Identities, Temporalities, Politics.
Summary: Originally published in 1991. Addressing the ways in which the ideology of gender and its social construction determine autobiographical self-representations, the essays here consider several women's works in the light of the social and historical conditions which enabled their production. Some examine diaries as a feminine form and ask about the ways in which thematic content such as childbirth can or cannot be represented in diaries and public discourse at different historical junctures. Others show the pressures of gender roles and how they have led to new genres in which self-representation is often a refraction of the representation of others. With the tools of gender theory, the representation of hermaphroditism, masculinity and male bodies is analysed and the ways in which gender intersects with racial, sexual and class ideologies is also looked at, in seeing autobiography as a form of agency in self-construction.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS366.A88 A93 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=2166410 Available EBC2166410

Cover -- Half Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Original Title -- Original Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Autobiography and Questions of Gender: An Introduction -- Auto/Bio/History: Modern Midwifery -- Refracting Selves: Kate Millett's The Basement -- From the Inside Out: Lily Briscoe a Self-Portrait: an autobiography by Mary Meigs -- A Signature of Lesbian Autobiography: "Gertrice/Altrude" -- Women's Autobiography: The Self at Stake? -- Engendered Autobiographies: The Diary as a Feminine Form -- Delivery: The Cultural Re-presentation of Childbirth -- Figuration and Disfigurement: Herculine Barbin and the Autobiography of the Body -- Autobiography, Bodies, Manhood -- Poet and Patriarch in Maxine Hong Kingston's China Men -- The Autobiographical Manifesto: Identities, Temporalities, Politics.

Originally published in 1991. Addressing the ways in which the ideology of gender and its social construction determine autobiographical self-representations, the essays here consider several women's works in the light of the social and historical conditions which enabled their production. Some examine diaries as a feminine form and ask about the ways in which thematic content such as childbirth can or cannot be represented in diaries and public discourse at different historical junctures. Others show the pressures of gender roles and how they have led to new genres in which self-representation is often a refraction of the representation of others. With the tools of gender theory, the representation of hermaphroditism, masculinity and male bodies is analysed and the ways in which gender intersects with racial, sexual and class ideologies is also looked at, in seeing autobiography as a form of agency in self-construction.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.