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The Myth of Post-Racialism in Television News.

By: Lewis, Libby.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Routledge Transformations in Race and Media: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2015Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (203 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317607267.Subject(s): African American journalists -- Social conditions | Mass media and race relations -- United States | Race discrimination -- United States | Racism in the press -- United States | Television broadcasting of news -- Political aspects -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Myth of Post-Racialism in Television NewsDDC classification: 070.195 Online resources: Click here to view book
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of Figures -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 Professionalizing and Palatable "Blackness" -- 2 Branding and Marketing "Blackness" -- 3 From Stumbling Block to Stepping Stone -- 4 Owning the "Ghetto" Shows -- 5 Rules of Engagement: The Politics of Race, Gender, and Sexuality -- 6 Barack and Michelle Obama as Signs of Progress and Threat -- Concluding Remarks -- Index.
Summary: This book explores the written and unwritten requirements Black journalists face in their efforts to get and keep jobs in television news. Informed by interviews with journalists themselves, Lewis examines how raced Black journalists and their journalism organizations process their circumstances and choose to respond to the corporate and institutional constraints they face. She uncovers the social construction and attempted control of "Blackness" in news production and its subversion by Black journalists negotiating issues of objectivity, authority, voice, and appearance along sites of multiple differences of race, gender, and sexuality.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN4888.R3 L49 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=2194972 Available EBC2194972

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of Figures -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 Professionalizing and Palatable "Blackness" -- 2 Branding and Marketing "Blackness" -- 3 From Stumbling Block to Stepping Stone -- 4 Owning the "Ghetto" Shows -- 5 Rules of Engagement: The Politics of Race, Gender, and Sexuality -- 6 Barack and Michelle Obama as Signs of Progress and Threat -- Concluding Remarks -- Index.

This book explores the written and unwritten requirements Black journalists face in their efforts to get and keep jobs in television news. Informed by interviews with journalists themselves, Lewis examines how raced Black journalists and their journalism organizations process their circumstances and choose to respond to the corporate and institutional constraints they face. She uncovers the social construction and attempted control of "Blackness" in news production and its subversion by Black journalists negotiating issues of objectivity, authority, voice, and appearance along sites of multiple differences of race, gender, and sexuality.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Libby Lewis, a former journalist and a lecturer in African American Studies at UCLA, explores the experiences of African American journalists in what many consider to be the postracial US. The author argues that media literacy is not just about looking at political biases that exist in news media but also understanding the barriers that many people of color in the industry face in front of and behind the camera. Based on her experience and research, she writes that newsroom culture tends to be exclusive of the minority population. The book's argument is strengthened by firsthand accounts by TV journalists who discuss their experiences with management decisions, including promotions and management of African American journalists within media corporations. Lewis also underscores the complexity of the newsroom environment for black female journalists. The focus of the book is about not just journalists, but also media portrayals of blackness, especially as observed in reporting on Barack and Michelle Obama. Lewis offers a convincing case that the myth of postracialism is nothing but a myth, and that the reality of American journalism is filled with examples of marginalization of African Americans. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. --Yuya Kiuchi, Michigan State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Libby Lewis is a Lecturer in African American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, USA. She earned a Ph.D. in African Diaspora Studies with a Designated Emphasis in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, USA.</p>

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