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The Contribution of Social Sciences to Sustainable Development at Universities.

By: Leal Filho, Walter.
Contributor(s): Zint, Michaela.
Material type: TextTextSeries: World Sustainability Series: Publisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (310 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319268668.Subject(s): Environmental managementGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Contribution of Social Sciences to Sustainable Development at UniversitiesDDC classification: 378.19 Online resources: Click here to view book
Contents:
Preface -- Contents -- Part I Theoretical Frameworks and Analyses -- 1 Rethinking Education for Sustainable Development: Interdisciplinarity, Community and Environmental Justice -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒSustainable Development at Universities: Three Positions -- 2.1 Sustainability Programs at Canadian Universities -- 2.2 The Status-Quo and Reform Positions -- 2.3 Regional Centres of Expertise, Environmental Justice, and the Transformative Position -- 3ƒConclusion -- References -- 2 Sustainable Internationalization? Measuring the Diversity of Internationalization at Higher Education Institutions -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒFramework for a Sustainable Internationalization Strategy -- 3ƒMethods -- 4ƒResults -- 5ƒDiscussion -- 6ƒConclusion -- References -- 3 Looking Beyond Fossil Fuel Divestment: Combating Climate Change in Higher Education -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction: Motives for Pro-environment Behaviors -- 2ƒStated Motives of Institutions -- 2.1 Successes -- 2.2 Rejections -- 3ƒGaps in Stated Motives -- 4ƒConclusion: Looking Beyond Divestment -- References -- 4 Beyond Recycling: Developing ``Deep'' Sustainability Competence -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒReview of Relevant Literature -- 2.1 Defining Sustainability -- 2.2 Developing Sustainability Competence -- 2.3 Deep Learning -- 2.4 Experiential Learning and EFS -- 3ƒMethods -- 3.1 Site and Setting -- 3.2 Data Collection -- 3.3 Data Analysis -- 3.4 Limitations -- 4ƒFindings -- 4.1 Meanings of Sustainability -- 4.2 Recycle -- 4.3 Reduce -- 4.4 Reuse -- 4.5 Beyond Environmental, Beyond the Individual -- 5ƒSustainability Competence for What? -- 5.1 Expanding Knowledge -- 5.2 Expanding Awareness -- 5.3 Expanding Skills -- 6ƒImplications -- 6.1 Developing ``Deep'' Competence -- 6.2 Politicized Ethic of Care -- 6.3 Developmental Readiness -- 7ƒConclusions -- References.
5 Discourses and Identity: An Educational Sociology Approach to Campus Sustainability Assessment -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒThe Production, Relocation and Communication of Discourse -- 3ƒProfessional Identity and Sustainability -- 4ƒCase Study -- 5ƒMethods -- 6ƒResults -- 7ƒDiscussion -- 8ƒConclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 6 Declarations and Commitments: The Cognitive Practice of Sustainability Agreements -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒSocial Learning Framework and Methods -- 3ƒThe Agreements -- 4ƒAnalysis -- 4.1 Mission and Vision -- 4.2 Roles and Role Models -- 4.3 Effectiveness and Measuring -- 5ƒCognitive Practice Summary -- 6ƒNetwork Analysis -- 7ƒDiscussion -- 7.1 Limitations -- 7.2 Implications for Institutional Practice -- 8ƒConclusion -- References -- 7 Place Consciousness as a Pathway Towards Campus Sustainability -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒTheoretical Framework -- 2.1 Sense of Place Concept -- 3ƒMethodology -- 3.1 Participants -- 3.2 Data Collection -- 3.2.1 Phase 1 -- 3.2.2 Phase 2 -- 3.2.3 Phase 3 -- 3.2.4 Phase 4 -- 3.3 Data Analysis -- 4ƒResults -- 4.1 Aruna's Story -- 4.2 Lee's Journey -- 4.3 Mary's Thoughts -- 5ƒDiscussion -- 6ƒConclusions -- References -- 8 Gauging Universities for Sustainability: Action Research as a Tool for Assessing and Influencing Organisational Transformation -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒWhy Do Universities Need to Become More Sustainable? -- 3ƒBeing the Insider in Sustainability Transformations -- 4ƒThe Action Research Approach -- 5ƒChallenges of Action Research for studying transformational processes -- 6ƒA Case-Study Employing Transformational Action Research -- 7ƒDiscussion and Conclusions -- References -- Part II Case Studies and Examplesof Implementation -- 9 Food Production as a Niche Innovation in Higher Education -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction.
2ƒFood Production as a Social Innovation -- 3ƒSocio-Technical Transitions and Strategic Niche Management -- 4ƒMethods -- 5ƒDiscussion -- 6ƒLimitations -- 7ƒConclusion -- References -- 10 Student Interest in Campus Community Gardens: Sowing the Seeds for Direct Engagement with Sustainability -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 1.1 The Importance of Everyday Involvement -- 1.2 Creating Fertile Ground for Student Engagement with Sustainability -- 1.3 Measuring Student Interest in Campus Community Gardening -- 2ƒMethods -- 2.1 Sample -- 2.2 Measures -- 3ƒResults -- 3.1 Hierarchical Regression -- 4ƒDiscussion -- 4.1 The Influence of Familiarity -- 4.2 The Importance of Community Benefits -- 4.3 The Broad Appeal of on-Campus Agriculture -- 5ƒConclusion -- References -- 11 Implementation of Education for Sustainable Development in Universities of Applied Sciences -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒGeneral Remarks on Implementing SD at Universities -- 2.1 Universities of Applied Sciences -- 2.2 Universities and Responsibility -- 2.3 The Baden-Württemberg Way: Network of Universities for SD -- 3ƒImplementing ESD at UoAS -- 3.1 Stepwise -- 3.2 Portfolio for the Implementation of Sustainable Development -- 3.2.1 HS Aalen -- 3.2.2 CUT Bloemfontein -- 4ƒEducational Methods -- 4.1 Projects as Part of the Real World Lab Aalen/Students Projects/Project Learning -- 4.1.1 Project Learning -- 4.1.2 Projects for ESD -- 4.2 Simulation Game -- 4.2.1 Educational Games and ESD -- 4.2.2 Educational Game VAL-U -- 5ƒConclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 12 Introducing the Graphical Assessment of Universities' Sustainability Image (GAUSI) Instrument: A Marketing Tool -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒLiterature Review -- 2.1 Marketing Concepts Relevant to University Sustainability -- 2.1.1 Institutional Image -- 2.1.2 Strategic Positioning of Institutional Image.
2.1.3 Institutional Reputation -- 2.1.4 Decision-Making Process -- 2.2 Assessment of Universities' Sustainable Institutional Image -- 2.2.1 Assessing University Institutional Image -- 2.2.2 Assessing University Sustainability Efforts -- 3ƒGraphical Assessment of Universities' Sustainability Image (GAUSI) -- 3.1 The GAUSI Questionnaire -- 3.2 Suggested Methods -- 3.2.1 Sampling Design -- 3.2.2 Procedure -- 3.2.3 Graphical Representation -- 3.3 Contribution of the GAUSI Instrument -- 3.4 Limitations of the GAUSI Instrument -- 4ƒDiscussion -- 5ƒConclusion -- References -- 13 Assessing Resources and Dynamic Capabilities to Implement the ``Green Campus'' Project -- Abstract -- 1ƒSustainable Development and the Role of Universities -- 2ƒTheoretical Background: The Resource-Based View and the Dynamic Capabilities Theory -- 3ƒSustainable Universities and Green Campus Initiatives: Overview of the Literature -- 4ƒA Case Study: Politecnico Di Bari Green Campus Project -- 5ƒThe Green Campus Project Discussed Through the Lens of RBV AndDCT -- 6ƒConclusions -- References -- 14 Think Big, Live Green: Community-Specific Sustainability Engagement Campaigns -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒSustainability at Cornell -- 3ƒSustainability Engagement at Cornell -- 4ƒThink Big, Live Green -- 4.1 Community Research -- 4.2 College-Level Leadership -- 4.3 College Level Engagement -- 5ƒMoving from Plans to Action -- 6ƒConclusion and Looking Forward -- References -- 15 Obstacles to Curriculum Greening: The Case of Green Chemistry -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒMethods and Theoretical Framework -- 3ƒThe Environmental Education Movement -- 4ƒMediating Factors -- 4.1 Departmental Colleagues: Potential Roadblocks -- 4.1.1 Strategies for Responding to the Resistance -- 4.2 Leadership from the Chemistry Discipline -- 4.3 Administrators: Controllers of the Funding Faucet.
4.4 Students: Potential Sources of Resistance or Potential Catalysts -- 5ƒConclusion -- References -- 16 Changing Energy Behavior Through Community Based Social Marketing -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction: Behavior Matters -- 2ƒCommunity Based Social Marketing: An Overview -- 3ƒGetting Started: Implementation at Oberlin -- 4ƒTesting Our Interventions: Two Field Studies -- 4.1 Encouraging Cold Water Washing -- 4.2 Turning off Lights in Unused Classrooms -- 5ƒConclusion: Implementing CBSM Research Programs on Other Campuses -- References -- 17 Material Values, Goals, and Water Use: Results from a Campus Residence Hall Survey -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction: Water Conservation -- 1.1 Barriers to Eco-friendly Behavior -- 1.2 Values and Eco-friendly Behavior -- 1.3 Campus Environmental Interventions -- 2ƒThe Present Study -- 3ƒMethod -- 3.1 Participants -- 3.2 Materials and Procedure -- 4ƒResults -- 5ƒDiscussion -- 6ƒConclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 18 Understanding Recycling While Tailgating: Applying an Information-Motives-Behavior Skills Approach -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒIdentifying the Scale of the Problem -- 3ƒThe IMB Model -- 4ƒThe Present Research -- 5ƒDescription of the Venue Infrastructure -- 6ƒProcedure -- 7ƒParticipants -- 8ƒObservational Measures -- 8.1 Waste Disposal Behavior -- 8.2 Estimated Group Demographics -- 9ƒSurvey Measures -- 10ƒAnalytical Strategy -- 11ƒBehavioral Observations -- 11.1 How Much Are Tailgaters Using the Venue's Infrastructure? -- 11.2 Who Is Using the Venue's Infrastructure? -- 12ƒReported Recycling Behavior -- 12.1 Predictors of Recycling -- 12.2 Who Is Most Likely to Recycle While Tailgating? -- 13ƒDiscussion and Conclusions -- 13.1 Practical Implications -- 13.2 Limitations -- 13.3 Moving Forward and Broader Implications -- Acknowledgments -- References.
19 Social Sciences and Campus Sustainable Development: The Way Forward.
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Preface -- Contents -- Part I Theoretical Frameworks and Analyses -- 1 Rethinking Education for Sustainable Development: Interdisciplinarity, Community and Environmental Justice -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒSustainable Development at Universities: Three Positions -- 2.1 Sustainability Programs at Canadian Universities -- 2.2 The Status-Quo and Reform Positions -- 2.3 Regional Centres of Expertise, Environmental Justice, and the Transformative Position -- 3ƒConclusion -- References -- 2 Sustainable Internationalization? Measuring the Diversity of Internationalization at Higher Education Institutions -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒFramework for a Sustainable Internationalization Strategy -- 3ƒMethods -- 4ƒResults -- 5ƒDiscussion -- 6ƒConclusion -- References -- 3 Looking Beyond Fossil Fuel Divestment: Combating Climate Change in Higher Education -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction: Motives for Pro-environment Behaviors -- 2ƒStated Motives of Institutions -- 2.1 Successes -- 2.2 Rejections -- 3ƒGaps in Stated Motives -- 4ƒConclusion: Looking Beyond Divestment -- References -- 4 Beyond Recycling: Developing ``Deep'' Sustainability Competence -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒReview of Relevant Literature -- 2.1 Defining Sustainability -- 2.2 Developing Sustainability Competence -- 2.3 Deep Learning -- 2.4 Experiential Learning and EFS -- 3ƒMethods -- 3.1 Site and Setting -- 3.2 Data Collection -- 3.3 Data Analysis -- 3.4 Limitations -- 4ƒFindings -- 4.1 Meanings of Sustainability -- 4.2 Recycle -- 4.3 Reduce -- 4.4 Reuse -- 4.5 Beyond Environmental, Beyond the Individual -- 5ƒSustainability Competence for What? -- 5.1 Expanding Knowledge -- 5.2 Expanding Awareness -- 5.3 Expanding Skills -- 6ƒImplications -- 6.1 Developing ``Deep'' Competence -- 6.2 Politicized Ethic of Care -- 6.3 Developmental Readiness -- 7ƒConclusions -- References.

5 Discourses and Identity: An Educational Sociology Approach to Campus Sustainability Assessment -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒThe Production, Relocation and Communication of Discourse -- 3ƒProfessional Identity and Sustainability -- 4ƒCase Study -- 5ƒMethods -- 6ƒResults -- 7ƒDiscussion -- 8ƒConclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 6 Declarations and Commitments: The Cognitive Practice of Sustainability Agreements -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒSocial Learning Framework and Methods -- 3ƒThe Agreements -- 4ƒAnalysis -- 4.1 Mission and Vision -- 4.2 Roles and Role Models -- 4.3 Effectiveness and Measuring -- 5ƒCognitive Practice Summary -- 6ƒNetwork Analysis -- 7ƒDiscussion -- 7.1 Limitations -- 7.2 Implications for Institutional Practice -- 8ƒConclusion -- References -- 7 Place Consciousness as a Pathway Towards Campus Sustainability -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒTheoretical Framework -- 2.1 Sense of Place Concept -- 3ƒMethodology -- 3.1 Participants -- 3.2 Data Collection -- 3.2.1 Phase 1 -- 3.2.2 Phase 2 -- 3.2.3 Phase 3 -- 3.2.4 Phase 4 -- 3.3 Data Analysis -- 4ƒResults -- 4.1 Aruna's Story -- 4.2 Lee's Journey -- 4.3 Mary's Thoughts -- 5ƒDiscussion -- 6ƒConclusions -- References -- 8 Gauging Universities for Sustainability: Action Research as a Tool for Assessing and Influencing Organisational Transformation -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒWhy Do Universities Need to Become More Sustainable? -- 3ƒBeing the Insider in Sustainability Transformations -- 4ƒThe Action Research Approach -- 5ƒChallenges of Action Research for studying transformational processes -- 6ƒA Case-Study Employing Transformational Action Research -- 7ƒDiscussion and Conclusions -- References -- Part II Case Studies and Examplesof Implementation -- 9 Food Production as a Niche Innovation in Higher Education -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction.

2ƒFood Production as a Social Innovation -- 3ƒSocio-Technical Transitions and Strategic Niche Management -- 4ƒMethods -- 5ƒDiscussion -- 6ƒLimitations -- 7ƒConclusion -- References -- 10 Student Interest in Campus Community Gardens: Sowing the Seeds for Direct Engagement with Sustainability -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 1.1 The Importance of Everyday Involvement -- 1.2 Creating Fertile Ground for Student Engagement with Sustainability -- 1.3 Measuring Student Interest in Campus Community Gardening -- 2ƒMethods -- 2.1 Sample -- 2.2 Measures -- 3ƒResults -- 3.1 Hierarchical Regression -- 4ƒDiscussion -- 4.1 The Influence of Familiarity -- 4.2 The Importance of Community Benefits -- 4.3 The Broad Appeal of on-Campus Agriculture -- 5ƒConclusion -- References -- 11 Implementation of Education for Sustainable Development in Universities of Applied Sciences -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒGeneral Remarks on Implementing SD at Universities -- 2.1 Universities of Applied Sciences -- 2.2 Universities and Responsibility -- 2.3 The Baden-Württemberg Way: Network of Universities for SD -- 3ƒImplementing ESD at UoAS -- 3.1 Stepwise -- 3.2 Portfolio for the Implementation of Sustainable Development -- 3.2.1 HS Aalen -- 3.2.2 CUT Bloemfontein -- 4ƒEducational Methods -- 4.1 Projects as Part of the Real World Lab Aalen/Students Projects/Project Learning -- 4.1.1 Project Learning -- 4.1.2 Projects for ESD -- 4.2 Simulation Game -- 4.2.1 Educational Games and ESD -- 4.2.2 Educational Game VAL-U -- 5ƒConclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 12 Introducing the Graphical Assessment of Universities' Sustainability Image (GAUSI) Instrument: A Marketing Tool -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒLiterature Review -- 2.1 Marketing Concepts Relevant to University Sustainability -- 2.1.1 Institutional Image -- 2.1.2 Strategic Positioning of Institutional Image.

2.1.3 Institutional Reputation -- 2.1.4 Decision-Making Process -- 2.2 Assessment of Universities' Sustainable Institutional Image -- 2.2.1 Assessing University Institutional Image -- 2.2.2 Assessing University Sustainability Efforts -- 3ƒGraphical Assessment of Universities' Sustainability Image (GAUSI) -- 3.1 The GAUSI Questionnaire -- 3.2 Suggested Methods -- 3.2.1 Sampling Design -- 3.2.2 Procedure -- 3.2.3 Graphical Representation -- 3.3 Contribution of the GAUSI Instrument -- 3.4 Limitations of the GAUSI Instrument -- 4ƒDiscussion -- 5ƒConclusion -- References -- 13 Assessing Resources and Dynamic Capabilities to Implement the ``Green Campus'' Project -- Abstract -- 1ƒSustainable Development and the Role of Universities -- 2ƒTheoretical Background: The Resource-Based View and the Dynamic Capabilities Theory -- 3ƒSustainable Universities and Green Campus Initiatives: Overview of the Literature -- 4ƒA Case Study: Politecnico Di Bari Green Campus Project -- 5ƒThe Green Campus Project Discussed Through the Lens of RBV AndDCT -- 6ƒConclusions -- References -- 14 Think Big, Live Green: Community-Specific Sustainability Engagement Campaigns -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒSustainability at Cornell -- 3ƒSustainability Engagement at Cornell -- 4ƒThink Big, Live Green -- 4.1 Community Research -- 4.2 College-Level Leadership -- 4.3 College Level Engagement -- 5ƒMoving from Plans to Action -- 6ƒConclusion and Looking Forward -- References -- 15 Obstacles to Curriculum Greening: The Case of Green Chemistry -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒMethods and Theoretical Framework -- 3ƒThe Environmental Education Movement -- 4ƒMediating Factors -- 4.1 Departmental Colleagues: Potential Roadblocks -- 4.1.1 Strategies for Responding to the Resistance -- 4.2 Leadership from the Chemistry Discipline -- 4.3 Administrators: Controllers of the Funding Faucet.

4.4 Students: Potential Sources of Resistance or Potential Catalysts -- 5ƒConclusion -- References -- 16 Changing Energy Behavior Through Community Based Social Marketing -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction: Behavior Matters -- 2ƒCommunity Based Social Marketing: An Overview -- 3ƒGetting Started: Implementation at Oberlin -- 4ƒTesting Our Interventions: Two Field Studies -- 4.1 Encouraging Cold Water Washing -- 4.2 Turning off Lights in Unused Classrooms -- 5ƒConclusion: Implementing CBSM Research Programs on Other Campuses -- References -- 17 Material Values, Goals, and Water Use: Results from a Campus Residence Hall Survey -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction: Water Conservation -- 1.1 Barriers to Eco-friendly Behavior -- 1.2 Values and Eco-friendly Behavior -- 1.3 Campus Environmental Interventions -- 2ƒThe Present Study -- 3ƒMethod -- 3.1 Participants -- 3.2 Materials and Procedure -- 4ƒResults -- 5ƒDiscussion -- 6ƒConclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 18 Understanding Recycling While Tailgating: Applying an Information-Motives-Behavior Skills Approach -- Abstract -- 1ƒIntroduction -- 2ƒIdentifying the Scale of the Problem -- 3ƒThe IMB Model -- 4ƒThe Present Research -- 5ƒDescription of the Venue Infrastructure -- 6ƒProcedure -- 7ƒParticipants -- 8ƒObservational Measures -- 8.1 Waste Disposal Behavior -- 8.2 Estimated Group Demographics -- 9ƒSurvey Measures -- 10ƒAnalytical Strategy -- 11ƒBehavioral Observations -- 11.1 How Much Are Tailgaters Using the Venue's Infrastructure? -- 11.2 Who Is Using the Venue's Infrastructure? -- 12ƒReported Recycling Behavior -- 12.1 Predictors of Recycling -- 12.2 Who Is Most Likely to Recycle While Tailgating? -- 13ƒDiscussion and Conclusions -- 13.1 Practical Implications -- 13.2 Limitations -- 13.3 Moving Forward and Broader Implications -- Acknowledgments -- References.

19 Social Sciences and Campus Sustainable Development: The Way Forward.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Walter Leal Filho is a senior professor at Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (Germany) and at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. He specializes in matters related to sustainability in higher education and has in excess of 300 publications to his credit. He is the founding editor of the "International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education" and has undertaken a variety of projects addressing sustainability in a higher education context.</p> <p>Michaela Zint is a professor at the University of Michigan, with appointments in the School of Natural Resources & Environment, School of Education, and College of Literature, Science & the Arts. Her environmental education research has been published in the leading journals of a variety of fields and she has served on a number of editorial boards. She teaches higher education students to apply insights from a range of social science disciplines to advance campus sustainability, out of which her interest in this particular volume arose.</p>

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