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The New African Diaspora in the United States.

By: Falola, Toyin.
Contributor(s): Oyebade, Adebayo.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge African Studies: Publisher: New York : Taylor and Francis, 2016Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (207 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781134831418.Subject(s): Africans--United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The New African Diaspora in the United StatesDDC classification: 304.87309599999998 LOC classification: E184.A24.N53 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of figures -- List of tables -- Notes on contributors -- Preface -- Introduction -- PART I Historical and conceptual perspective -- 1 Pan-Africanism and the integration of continental and Diaspora Africans -- PART II Continental expressions and Diasporan identities -- 2 The young Igbo Diaspora in the United States -- 3 African immigrants and their churches -- 4 The making of the Liberian Diasporas and the challenges of postwar reconstruction -- 5 Exploring the transformative effects of policy among African Diaspora voters -- 6 Contemporary migrations of Nigerians to the United States -- PART III The Diaspora and continental ramifications -- 7 The remittance objectives of second-generation Ghanaian Americans -- 8 The Diaspora and the leadership challenge in Nigeria -- 9 The role of the Diaspora in strengthening democratic governance in Africa -- 10 The Visa Lottery versus brain drain: the impact of the African Diaspora on vocational artisanship -- 11 Revisiting Africa's brain drain and the Diaspora option -- Bibliography -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184.A24.N53 2017 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4578575 Available EBC4578575

Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of figures -- List of tables -- Notes on contributors -- Preface -- Introduction -- PART I Historical and conceptual perspective -- 1 Pan-Africanism and the integration of continental and Diaspora Africans -- PART II Continental expressions and Diasporan identities -- 2 The young Igbo Diaspora in the United States -- 3 African immigrants and their churches -- 4 The making of the Liberian Diasporas and the challenges of postwar reconstruction -- 5 Exploring the transformative effects of policy among African Diaspora voters -- 6 Contemporary migrations of Nigerians to the United States -- PART III The Diaspora and continental ramifications -- 7 The remittance objectives of second-generation Ghanaian Americans -- 8 The Diaspora and the leadership challenge in Nigeria -- 9 The role of the Diaspora in strengthening democratic governance in Africa -- 10 The Visa Lottery versus brain drain: the impact of the African Diaspora on vocational artisanship -- 11 Revisiting Africa's brain drain and the Diaspora option -- Bibliography -- Index.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Primarily exploring African migrants who arrived in the US after the transatlantic enslavement era (15th-19th centuries), this book essentially focuses on the 1980s as a distinctly "new African diaspora" that brought voluntary migrants looking for educational and economic opportunities. Many thousands from African nations decided to settle and stay in the US, often raising "new African American" children who did not share the involuntary enslavement experience of earlier African arrivals. Eleven contributions plus an introduction from 13 writers who derive from the population group under question bring authenticity to the book's key themes and perspectives. Overall, this study provides insight into Africans who settled in the US to forge what the editors deem a "new African diaspora" that speaks beyond the history of the "elder African diaspora" of enslavement, segregation, and second-class citizenship. However, a critique is that at least since the 1950s, African students have been coming to the US, and many of them stayed. Therefore, the "new African diaspora" paradigm may be somewhat flawed, as this "new" diaspora may well be 20-30 years older than the model put forward by the editors. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Mark Christian, Lehman College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Toyin Falola is the Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair Professor in the Humanities and a Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin, US. </p> <p>Adebayo Oyebade is Professor of History at Tennessee State University, Nashville, Tennessee, US.</p>

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