Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Politics and Education in Argentina, 1946-1962.

By: Rein, Monica.
Contributor(s): Levine, Robert M | Grenzeback, Martha.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2016Copyright date: ©1998Description: 1 online resource (196 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781315502717.Subject(s): Argentina--Social conditions--1945-1983Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Politics and Education in Argentina, 1946-1962DDC classification: 379.82 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- List of Tables -- Series Foreword -- Preface and Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- I. The Peronization of the Education System -- 1. Politics and Ideology in Peronist Argentina -- 2. "The Only Privileged People in the New Argentina": Children and Education in Peronist Thought and Policy -- 3. "A Message of Light": The Peronization of the Schools -- 4. Repression and Resistance: The Battle for Control of the Universities -- II. The De-Peronization of the Education System (1955-1962) -- 5. "The Tyrant Is Gone, Long Live the Tyranny!": Politics and Ideology during the Liberating Revolution and the Frondizi Era -- 6. Stamping Out Peronism: Is There an Educational Alternative? -- 7. Democratization on a Limited Warranty: The Universities under the Liberating Revolution -- 8. "Secular or Free": Defining the University during the Frondizi Era -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index -- About the Author.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
LC92.A6R45 1998 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4578664 Available EBC4578664

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- List of Tables -- Series Foreword -- Preface and Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- I. The Peronization of the Education System -- 1. Politics and Ideology in Peronist Argentina -- 2. "The Only Privileged People in the New Argentina": Children and Education in Peronist Thought and Policy -- 3. "A Message of Light": The Peronization of the Schools -- 4. Repression and Resistance: The Battle for Control of the Universities -- II. The De-Peronization of the Education System (1955-1962) -- 5. "The Tyrant Is Gone, Long Live the Tyranny!": Politics and Ideology during the Liberating Revolution and the Frondizi Era -- 6. Stamping Out Peronism: Is There an Educational Alternative? -- 7. Democratization on a Limited Warranty: The Universities under the Liberating Revolution -- 8. "Secular or Free": Defining the University during the Frondizi Era -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index -- About the Author.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

One of the more interesting case studies of educational reform in the twentieth century is that of Argentina under the Perons. The creation of the "New Argentina," the ostensible goal of the Peronist regime, meant that "all the branches of the education system became media through which the regime conveyed the principles of justicialismo." The educational system was effectively recast and then utilized as one of the primary means by which the ideology of the Peronist regime was transmitted and established in the national consciousness. Changes in education under the Perons were both structural and institutional (including the expansion of public schooling) and involved content (which became openly Peronist). In this work, Rein (Levinsky College of Education, Tel Aviv) provides a compelling and well-written examination of this intriguing period of Argentinean educational history and its aftermath--the years after the military coup of 1955 that ended the Peronist regime. It should be of interest to specialists concerned with education in Latin America, comparative educators and educational historians in general, and anyone interested in better understanding the role of the school in social and ideological reproduction. Graduate students and above. T. Reagan; University of Connecticut

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.