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Britain's Imperial Retreat from China, 1900-1931.

By: Chow, Phoebe.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Studies in the Modern History of Asia: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2016Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (263 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317437413.Subject(s): Imperialism--History--20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Britain's Imperial Retreat from China, 1900-1931DDC classification: 951.04 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Introduction -- The structure of British informal empire in China -- The historiography of British retreat -- Methodology -- Public opinion and policy -- Measuring influence on policy -- Chapter organisation -- Notes -- PART I: Laying the foundation for retreat, pre-1900 to 1925 -- 1. British thought about China, pre-1900 -- 'So well conceited of themselves': early Jesuit and British accounts -- 'Fifty years of Europe' vs. 'a cycle of Cathay': imperialism and China -- Christianity, compassion and modernity: missionary views -- The moral burden: Victorian travel writings -- British policy, 1895-1900 -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 2. 'Dealing gently with the Chinese in their new mood', 1900-1910 -- The Boxer Uprising, 1900 -- The Boxer Uprising and Chinese 'awakening' -- Sir Robert Hart and Chinese 'awakening' -- Official policy, 1901-1904 -- Chinese nationalism, 1905 -- G.E. Morrison's opinions and influence -- Official policy, 1905-1910 -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 3. 'Young China' in Revolution and the First World War, 1911-1918 -- Assessments of the Revolution of 1911 -- British policy towards China, 1911-1918 -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 4. Nationalist and communist challenges to British imperialism, 1919 to early 1925 -- The First World War and empire -- The Paris Peace Conference -- The creation of a new order in East Asia -- Chinese issues, 1922-1924 -- The Bolshevik threat and the Yellow Peril -- The Boxer Indemnity and Chinese educational exchange -- Conclusion -- Notes -- PART II: Britain's retreat from China, 1925-1931 -- 5. 'There is no hope in the traditional policy of bullying': May 30th 1925 -- Unrest in China: May 30th and its aftermath -- The view from Whitehall -- Government advisers and lobbyists -- Public responses -- The government response -- Conclusion.
Notes -- 6. 'We alone are trying to do the right thing by China': the December Memorandum, 1926 -- The Hong Kong boycott and the business lobby -- The Tariff Conference in Beijing -- Finding consensus -- Changing perceptions of the GMD -- Challenging conciliation -- The move towards a pro-GMD policy -- The new China policy: creating the December memorandum -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 7. China as a 'constant source of anxiety': the sending of the Shanghai Defense Force, 1927 -- The Hankou Incident, the Shanghai Defence Force and the public response -- The Chen-O'Malley Agreement -- The Nanjing 'outrages' -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 8. Ending informal empire in China, 1928-1931 -- Towards consensus -- The break with Russia -- The consolidation of public opinion -- 'An almost united British opinion' -- Continuing retreat -- Did the British retreat? -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DA47.9.C6.C469 2017 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4595190 Available EBC4595190

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Introduction -- The structure of British informal empire in China -- The historiography of British retreat -- Methodology -- Public opinion and policy -- Measuring influence on policy -- Chapter organisation -- Notes -- PART I: Laying the foundation for retreat, pre-1900 to 1925 -- 1. British thought about China, pre-1900 -- 'So well conceited of themselves': early Jesuit and British accounts -- 'Fifty years of Europe' vs. 'a cycle of Cathay': imperialism and China -- Christianity, compassion and modernity: missionary views -- The moral burden: Victorian travel writings -- British policy, 1895-1900 -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 2. 'Dealing gently with the Chinese in their new mood', 1900-1910 -- The Boxer Uprising, 1900 -- The Boxer Uprising and Chinese 'awakening' -- Sir Robert Hart and Chinese 'awakening' -- Official policy, 1901-1904 -- Chinese nationalism, 1905 -- G.E. Morrison's opinions and influence -- Official policy, 1905-1910 -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 3. 'Young China' in Revolution and the First World War, 1911-1918 -- Assessments of the Revolution of 1911 -- British policy towards China, 1911-1918 -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 4. Nationalist and communist challenges to British imperialism, 1919 to early 1925 -- The First World War and empire -- The Paris Peace Conference -- The creation of a new order in East Asia -- Chinese issues, 1922-1924 -- The Bolshevik threat and the Yellow Peril -- The Boxer Indemnity and Chinese educational exchange -- Conclusion -- Notes -- PART II: Britain's retreat from China, 1925-1931 -- 5. 'There is no hope in the traditional policy of bullying': May 30th 1925 -- Unrest in China: May 30th and its aftermath -- The view from Whitehall -- Government advisers and lobbyists -- Public responses -- The government response -- Conclusion.

Notes -- 6. 'We alone are trying to do the right thing by China': the December Memorandum, 1926 -- The Hong Kong boycott and the business lobby -- The Tariff Conference in Beijing -- Finding consensus -- Changing perceptions of the GMD -- Challenging conciliation -- The move towards a pro-GMD policy -- The new China policy: creating the December memorandum -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 7. China as a 'constant source of anxiety': the sending of the Shanghai Defense Force, 1927 -- The Hankou Incident, the Shanghai Defence Force and the public response -- The Chen-O'Malley Agreement -- The Nanjing 'outrages' -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 8. Ending informal empire in China, 1928-1931 -- Towards consensus -- The break with Russia -- The consolidation of public opinion -- 'An almost united British opinion' -- Continuing retreat -- Did the British retreat? -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index.

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