Yearbook on Space Policy 2015 : Access to Space and the Evolution of Space Activities.

By: Al-Ekabi, CenanContributor(s): Baranes, Blandina | Hulsroj, Peter | Lahcen, ArneMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandYearbook on Space Policy Ser: Publisher: Vienna : Springer, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (319 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783709148600Subject(s): ManagementGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Yearbook on Space Policy 2015 : Access to Space and the Evolution of Space ActivitiesDDC classification: 629.405 LOC classification: TA1-2040Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Preface -- Contents -- List of Acronyms: Acronym Explanation -- Part I: The Year in Space 2015 -- Chapter 1: European Space Activities in the Global Context -- 1.1 Global Political and Economic Trends -- 1.1.1 Global Economic Outlook -- 1.1.2 Political Developments -- 1.1.2.1 Geopolitics -- 1.1.2.2 Environment -- 1.1.2.3 Energy -- 1.1.2.4 Resources -- 1.1.2.5 Knowledge -- 1.1.2.6 Mobility -- 1.1.3 Main Science and Technology Indicators Relevant for Space Activities -- 1.1.3.1 Science and Technology Inputs -- 1.1.3.2 Science and Technology Outputs -- 1.2 Worldwide Space Policies and Strategies -- 1.2.1 The United Nations System -- 1.2.1.1 United Nations General Assembly -- 1.2.1.2 UNGA Committees -- 1.2.1.3 Other UN Bodies and Organs Monitoring Outer Space Activities -- 1.2.2 The Group on Earth Observation -- 1.2.3 Europe -- 1.2.3.1 European Space Agency -- 1.2.3.2 European Union -- 1.2.3.3 EUMETSAT -- 1.2.3.4 National Governments -- France -- Germany -- Italy -- The United Kingdom -- 1.2.4 The United States -- 1.2.5 Canada -- 1.2.6 Russia -- 1.2.7 Japan -- 1.2.8 China -- 1.2.9 India -- 1.2.10 Brazil -- 1.3 Worldwide Space Budgets and Revenues -- 1.3.1 Overview of Institutional Space Budgets -- 1.3.2 Overview of Commercial Space Markets -- 1.3.3 Developments in the Space Industry -- 1.3.3.1 Industrial Developments in Europe -- 1.3.3.2 Industrial Developments in the United States -- 1.3.3.3 Industrial Developments in Russia -- 1.3.3.4 Industrial Developments in Japan -- 1.3.3.5 Industrial Developments in China -- 1.3.3.6 Industrial Developments in India -- 1.3.3.7 World -- 1.3.4 Industrial Overview -- 1.3.4.1 Launch Sector -- 1.3.4.2 Satellite Manufacturing Sector -- 1.3.4.3 Satellite Operators Sector -- 1.4 The Security Dimension -- 1.4.1 The Global Space Military Context -- 1.4.2 Europe -- 1.4.3 The United States -- 1.4.4 Russia.
1.4.5 Japan -- 1.4.6 China -- 1.4.7 India -- Chapter 2: Developments in Space Policies, Programmes and Technologies Throughout the World and in Europe -- 2.1 Space Policies and Programmes -- 2.2 Space Transportation -- 2.2.1 Europe -- 2.2.2 United States -- 2.2.3 Russia -- 2.2.4 Japan -- 2.2.5 China -- 2.2.6 India -- 2.3 Space Science and Exploration -- 2.3.1 Human Spaceflight Activities -- 2.3.2 Lunar Science -- 2.3.3 Mars Science -- 2.3.4 Saturn Science -- 2.3.5 Venus Science -- 2.3.6 Mercury Science -- 2.3.7 Jupiter Science -- 2.3.8 Solar Observation -- 2.3.9 Solar System Science -- 2.3.10 Outer Solar Science -- 2.4 Satellite Applications -- 2.4.1 Space-Based Communications -- 2.4.2 Space-Based Positioning, Navigation and Timing Systems -- 2.5 Technology Developments -- 2.5.1 Propulsion -- 2.5.2 Spacecraft Operations and Design -- 2.5.3 Suborbital Activities -- 2.5.4 Other Technologies -- Part II: Views and InsightsEdited by Arne Lahcen -- Chapter 3: Issues and Perspectives on Space Launch Vehicles´ Development -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 The Current Range of European Launcher: Ariane 5, Soyuz and Vega -- 3.3 The Current Global Context: Fierce Competition and a Guaranteed Captive Market for Ariane´s Competitors -- 3.4 The Luxembourg Decision of December 2014 -- 3.5 A Long-Term Trend: The Reduction of Costs for Accessing Space -- Chapter 4: Space at a Crossroads: Government Programmes Can Benefit from Commercial Space and Other Changes If Long-Standing C... -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The GAO and Space -- 4.3 ``Going Commercial´´ Is Becoming an Attractive Option for the U.S. Government -- 4.4 Industry Changes Also Make ``Going Commercial´´ More Attractive -- 4.5 Without Addressing Long-Standing Challenges, Going Commercial Could Have Negative Consequences -- 4.6 GAO´s Recommendations Can Help Remove Some Barriers.
4.7 Agencies Will Still Need to Fix Problems That Go Beyond Acquisition Management -- Chapter 5: Virgin Galactic: Creating Safe, Reliable, and Frequent Access to Space -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 SpaceShipTwo -- 5.3 Human Spaceflight -- 5.4 Microgravity Research -- 5.5 LauncherOne -- Chapter 6: The Future of Satellite Applications: The End-User Perspective -- 6.1 Benefits from Space Revisited -- 6.2 Space Serving Society: Understanding Demand Is Key to Becoming Part of the Solution -- 6.2.1 Looking Beyond the Space Segment Downstream Value-Added Chain: The User Perspective -- 6.2.2 Serving User Communities Better: Horizontal Integration at the Level of the Offer -- 6.3 The Big Data and Interconnectivity Gordian Node -- 6.3.1 Volume, Velocity and Variety: Satellite Data Is Big Data -- 6.3.1.1 High Volume -- 6.3.1.2 High Velocity -- 6.3.1.3 High Variety with Variable Accuracy and Quality -- 6.3.2 Data to the User or User to the Data? -- 6.3.3 From Big Data to Connected Data and IoT -- 6.4 Public Authorities: Main Users of Satellite Applications? -- 6.4.1 Satellite Applications in Support of a Public Mission -- 6.4.1.1 Satellite Applications in Support of (EU) Policies and Regulations on Regional and Local Levels -- 6.4.1.2 Satellite Applications Improving Public Services -- 6.4.1.3 Satellite Applications for Regional Economies -- 6.4.2 Public Authorities a Junior Partner for the Satapps Industry? -- 6.5 The Stars Are the Limit -- Chapter 7: Efficient Access to Space: Implications for Space Astronomy -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Telescopes on the Ground and in Space -- 7.2.1 Optical (Visible Light) Telescopes on Ground and in Space -- 7.2.2 Cost Comparison -- 7.3 Why Are Space Telescopes So Expensive? -- 7.4 Serendipity Is the Nature of Exploration -- 7.4.1 Major Astronomy Discoveries -- 7.4.2 Expensive Access to Space Limits Our Discoveries.
7.5 Efficient Access to Space -- Chapter 8: Potentially Transformative Technologies for Twenty-First Century Space -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Potentially Transformative Themes for the Space Sector -- 8.2.1 Autonomy -- 8.2.2 Ionising Radiation -- 8.2.3 In Space Resource Utilisation: Very Large Structures -- 8.2.4 Further, Potential Game Changing Technologies -- 8.3 Conclusions -- Chapter 9: Big Data from Outer Space: Opportunities and Challenges for Crisis Response -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Crisis Response in a Commercial Space Age -- 9.2.1 Satellite Technology: New Actors, New Opportunities -- 9.2.2 The Rise of Digital Humanitarianism -- 9.3 Risks of Big Data in Humanitarian Action -- 9.3.1 Data Control -- 9.3.2 Digital Divide -- 9.3.3 Misuse of Open-Source and Personal Data -- 9.4 Conclusion: Geospatial Big Data and the Way Forward -- Chapter 10: Some Ethical Constraints on Near-Earth Resource Exploitation -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 NERs and Scarcity -- 10.2.1 NEAs -- 10.2.2 Lunar Polar Real Estate -- 10.2.3 Lunar He3 -- 10.2.4 Orbital Allocations -- 10.3 Rawls in Space -- 10.4 Existing Frameworks -- 10.4.1 ITU Orbital Allocation Regulations -- 10.4.2 ISA Deep Sea Mining Regulations -- 10.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 11: Governance, Strategies and Approaches in 2030: ``European Options´´ -- 11.1 Inspired Human Mind -- 11.2 The Role of the Public Domain -- 11.3 Revisiting Roles -- 11.4 Courage -- 11.5 Mind-Set -- 11.6 Vision and Heritage -- Chapter 12: The Economics of Launch Vehicles: Towards a New Business Model -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Launch Vehicle Economics: The Traditional Business Model -- 12.3 The ``Quasi´´ Commercial Launcher Industry -- 12.3.1 Technology Transfer Controls and the Launcher Market -- 12.4 A New Business Model? -- 12.4.1 SpaceX and the U.S. Launcher Market -- 12.4.2 The SpaceX Approach -- 12.5 Ariane and Arianespace.
12.6 Transformational Possibilities -- 12.6.1 Hypersonic Vehicles -- 12.7 The Impact of Low Cost Access to Space -- 12.8 Conclusions -- Part III: Facts and Figures -- Chapter 13: Chronology: 2015 -- 13.1 Access to Space -- 13.2 Space Science and Exploration -- 13.3 Applications -- 13.4 Policy and International Cooperation -- 13.5 Country Profiles 2015 -- Chapter 14: Bibliography of Space Policy Publications 2015 -- 14.1 Monographs -- 14.2 Articles -- Biographies -- About the Editors -- About the Authors.
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TL790 .O739 2014 Advances in Space Science and Technology : TL790 .O739 2014 Advances in Space Science and Technology : TL790.P458 2017 Dream Missions : TL790.Y437 2017 Yearbook on Space Policy 2015 : TL791.S65 E936 2013 Space exploration : TL793 .G457 2014 Women in Space : TL795 -- .I17 1979 Automatic Control in Space :

Intro -- Preface -- Contents -- List of Acronyms: Acronym Explanation -- Part I: The Year in Space 2015 -- Chapter 1: European Space Activities in the Global Context -- 1.1 Global Political and Economic Trends -- 1.1.1 Global Economic Outlook -- 1.1.2 Political Developments -- 1.1.2.1 Geopolitics -- 1.1.2.2 Environment -- 1.1.2.3 Energy -- 1.1.2.4 Resources -- 1.1.2.5 Knowledge -- 1.1.2.6 Mobility -- 1.1.3 Main Science and Technology Indicators Relevant for Space Activities -- 1.1.3.1 Science and Technology Inputs -- 1.1.3.2 Science and Technology Outputs -- 1.2 Worldwide Space Policies and Strategies -- 1.2.1 The United Nations System -- 1.2.1.1 United Nations General Assembly -- 1.2.1.2 UNGA Committees -- 1.2.1.3 Other UN Bodies and Organs Monitoring Outer Space Activities -- 1.2.2 The Group on Earth Observation -- 1.2.3 Europe -- 1.2.3.1 European Space Agency -- 1.2.3.2 European Union -- 1.2.3.3 EUMETSAT -- 1.2.3.4 National Governments -- France -- Germany -- Italy -- The United Kingdom -- 1.2.4 The United States -- 1.2.5 Canada -- 1.2.6 Russia -- 1.2.7 Japan -- 1.2.8 China -- 1.2.9 India -- 1.2.10 Brazil -- 1.3 Worldwide Space Budgets and Revenues -- 1.3.1 Overview of Institutional Space Budgets -- 1.3.2 Overview of Commercial Space Markets -- 1.3.3 Developments in the Space Industry -- 1.3.3.1 Industrial Developments in Europe -- 1.3.3.2 Industrial Developments in the United States -- 1.3.3.3 Industrial Developments in Russia -- 1.3.3.4 Industrial Developments in Japan -- 1.3.3.5 Industrial Developments in China -- 1.3.3.6 Industrial Developments in India -- 1.3.3.7 World -- 1.3.4 Industrial Overview -- 1.3.4.1 Launch Sector -- 1.3.4.2 Satellite Manufacturing Sector -- 1.3.4.3 Satellite Operators Sector -- 1.4 The Security Dimension -- 1.4.1 The Global Space Military Context -- 1.4.2 Europe -- 1.4.3 The United States -- 1.4.4 Russia.

1.4.5 Japan -- 1.4.6 China -- 1.4.7 India -- Chapter 2: Developments in Space Policies, Programmes and Technologies Throughout the World and in Europe -- 2.1 Space Policies and Programmes -- 2.2 Space Transportation -- 2.2.1 Europe -- 2.2.2 United States -- 2.2.3 Russia -- 2.2.4 Japan -- 2.2.5 China -- 2.2.6 India -- 2.3 Space Science and Exploration -- 2.3.1 Human Spaceflight Activities -- 2.3.2 Lunar Science -- 2.3.3 Mars Science -- 2.3.4 Saturn Science -- 2.3.5 Venus Science -- 2.3.6 Mercury Science -- 2.3.7 Jupiter Science -- 2.3.8 Solar Observation -- 2.3.9 Solar System Science -- 2.3.10 Outer Solar Science -- 2.4 Satellite Applications -- 2.4.1 Space-Based Communications -- 2.4.2 Space-Based Positioning, Navigation and Timing Systems -- 2.5 Technology Developments -- 2.5.1 Propulsion -- 2.5.2 Spacecraft Operations and Design -- 2.5.3 Suborbital Activities -- 2.5.4 Other Technologies -- Part II: Views and InsightsEdited by Arne Lahcen -- Chapter 3: Issues and Perspectives on Space Launch Vehicles´ Development -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 The Current Range of European Launcher: Ariane 5, Soyuz and Vega -- 3.3 The Current Global Context: Fierce Competition and a Guaranteed Captive Market for Ariane´s Competitors -- 3.4 The Luxembourg Decision of December 2014 -- 3.5 A Long-Term Trend: The Reduction of Costs for Accessing Space -- Chapter 4: Space at a Crossroads: Government Programmes Can Benefit from Commercial Space and Other Changes If Long-Standing C... -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The GAO and Space -- 4.3 ``Going Commercial´´ Is Becoming an Attractive Option for the U.S. Government -- 4.4 Industry Changes Also Make ``Going Commercial´´ More Attractive -- 4.5 Without Addressing Long-Standing Challenges, Going Commercial Could Have Negative Consequences -- 4.6 GAO´s Recommendations Can Help Remove Some Barriers.

4.7 Agencies Will Still Need to Fix Problems That Go Beyond Acquisition Management -- Chapter 5: Virgin Galactic: Creating Safe, Reliable, and Frequent Access to Space -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 SpaceShipTwo -- 5.3 Human Spaceflight -- 5.4 Microgravity Research -- 5.5 LauncherOne -- Chapter 6: The Future of Satellite Applications: The End-User Perspective -- 6.1 Benefits from Space Revisited -- 6.2 Space Serving Society: Understanding Demand Is Key to Becoming Part of the Solution -- 6.2.1 Looking Beyond the Space Segment Downstream Value-Added Chain: The User Perspective -- 6.2.2 Serving User Communities Better: Horizontal Integration at the Level of the Offer -- 6.3 The Big Data and Interconnectivity Gordian Node -- 6.3.1 Volume, Velocity and Variety: Satellite Data Is Big Data -- 6.3.1.1 High Volume -- 6.3.1.2 High Velocity -- 6.3.1.3 High Variety with Variable Accuracy and Quality -- 6.3.2 Data to the User or User to the Data? -- 6.3.3 From Big Data to Connected Data and IoT -- 6.4 Public Authorities: Main Users of Satellite Applications? -- 6.4.1 Satellite Applications in Support of a Public Mission -- 6.4.1.1 Satellite Applications in Support of (EU) Policies and Regulations on Regional and Local Levels -- 6.4.1.2 Satellite Applications Improving Public Services -- 6.4.1.3 Satellite Applications for Regional Economies -- 6.4.2 Public Authorities a Junior Partner for the Satapps Industry? -- 6.5 The Stars Are the Limit -- Chapter 7: Efficient Access to Space: Implications for Space Astronomy -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Telescopes on the Ground and in Space -- 7.2.1 Optical (Visible Light) Telescopes on Ground and in Space -- 7.2.2 Cost Comparison -- 7.3 Why Are Space Telescopes So Expensive? -- 7.4 Serendipity Is the Nature of Exploration -- 7.4.1 Major Astronomy Discoveries -- 7.4.2 Expensive Access to Space Limits Our Discoveries.

7.5 Efficient Access to Space -- Chapter 8: Potentially Transformative Technologies for Twenty-First Century Space -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Potentially Transformative Themes for the Space Sector -- 8.2.1 Autonomy -- 8.2.2 Ionising Radiation -- 8.2.3 In Space Resource Utilisation: Very Large Structures -- 8.2.4 Further, Potential Game Changing Technologies -- 8.3 Conclusions -- Chapter 9: Big Data from Outer Space: Opportunities and Challenges for Crisis Response -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Crisis Response in a Commercial Space Age -- 9.2.1 Satellite Technology: New Actors, New Opportunities -- 9.2.2 The Rise of Digital Humanitarianism -- 9.3 Risks of Big Data in Humanitarian Action -- 9.3.1 Data Control -- 9.3.2 Digital Divide -- 9.3.3 Misuse of Open-Source and Personal Data -- 9.4 Conclusion: Geospatial Big Data and the Way Forward -- Chapter 10: Some Ethical Constraints on Near-Earth Resource Exploitation -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 NERs and Scarcity -- 10.2.1 NEAs -- 10.2.2 Lunar Polar Real Estate -- 10.2.3 Lunar He3 -- 10.2.4 Orbital Allocations -- 10.3 Rawls in Space -- 10.4 Existing Frameworks -- 10.4.1 ITU Orbital Allocation Regulations -- 10.4.2 ISA Deep Sea Mining Regulations -- 10.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 11: Governance, Strategies and Approaches in 2030: ``European Options´´ -- 11.1 Inspired Human Mind -- 11.2 The Role of the Public Domain -- 11.3 Revisiting Roles -- 11.4 Courage -- 11.5 Mind-Set -- 11.6 Vision and Heritage -- Chapter 12: The Economics of Launch Vehicles: Towards a New Business Model -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Launch Vehicle Economics: The Traditional Business Model -- 12.3 The ``Quasi´´ Commercial Launcher Industry -- 12.3.1 Technology Transfer Controls and the Launcher Market -- 12.4 A New Business Model? -- 12.4.1 SpaceX and the U.S. Launcher Market -- 12.4.2 The SpaceX Approach -- 12.5 Ariane and Arianespace.

12.6 Transformational Possibilities -- 12.6.1 Hypersonic Vehicles -- 12.7 The Impact of Low Cost Access to Space -- 12.8 Conclusions -- Part III: Facts and Figures -- Chapter 13: Chronology: 2015 -- 13.1 Access to Space -- 13.2 Space Science and Exploration -- 13.3 Applications -- 13.4 Policy and International Cooperation -- 13.5 Country Profiles 2015 -- Chapter 14: Bibliography of Space Policy Publications 2015 -- 14.1 Monographs -- 14.2 Articles -- Biographies -- About the Editors -- About the Authors.

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