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Under Observation.

By: Adams, Samantha.
Contributor(s): Purtova, Nadezhda | Leenes, Ronald.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Issues in Privacy and Data Protection: Publisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (215 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319483429.Subject(s): Computer scienceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Under Observation: The Interplay Between eHealth and SurveillanceDDC classification: 610.285 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- 1 Introduction -- References -- Personal Health and Autonomy: An Uneasy Relationship -- 2 Unobtrusiveness in mHealth Design and Use: A Systematic Literature Study -- Abstract -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Method -- 2.3 Results -- 2.3.1 Defining Obtrusiveness and Unobtrusiveness -- 2.3.2 Common Characteristics of Obtrusiveness -- 2.3.3 Implications of Unobtrusiveness -- 2.3.4 Diminishing Obtrusiveness via Personalisation and Control -- 2.4 Analysis -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Bibliography -- 3 eHealth and Privacy in U.S. Employer Wellness Programs -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Employer-Sponsored Wellness Programs -- 3.3 Personal Health Information in Wellness Programs -- 3.4 Privacy, Surveillance and Wellness Programs -- 3.4.1 Informational Privacy -- 3.4.2 Physical Integrity -- 3.4.3 Decisional Autonomy -- 3.5 Conclusions, Recommendations and Further Research -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 4 Use of a Wearable Device to Promote Healthy Behaviors Among Employees of a Small-to-Medium Enterprise in the Netherlands -- Abstract -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Methods -- 4.2.1 The Case -- 4.2.2 Data Collection -- 4.3 Results -- 4.3.1 Fun Gadgets, with Preconditions -- 4.3.2 Initial Expectations: No Personal Health Change, but Team Benefits -- 4.3.3 Experiences: Caloric Input Hassles and Data Accuracy -- Increased Number of Steps -- 4.3.4 Socio-ethical Dilemmas -- 4.4 Discussion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Surveillance Practices for Risk Management -- 5 Selling Passive Monitoring to Manage Risk in Independent Living: Frontline Workers in a Bind -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Methods -- 5.2.1 Participants and Recruitment -- 5.2.2 Data Collection and Analysis -- 5.3 Findings -- 5.3.1 The Remote Monitoring System as Intervention -- 5.3.2 Ambivalence Under Organizational Pressure.
5.3.3 Encouraging Adoption: Bypassing, Moralizing, Appealing to Fear, and Bargaining -- 5.3.3.1 Bypassing the Client -- 5.3.3.2 Moralizing Discourse -- 5.3.3.3 Appealing to Fear -- 5.3.3.4 Bargaining -- 5.3.4 Reluctant Adoption: The Challenge of Selling -- 5.4 Discussion -- 5.5 Limitations and Future Research -- 5.6 Conclusion -- References -- 6 Veillance and Electronic Medical Records in Disease Management Programs in the Netherlands -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Background -- 6.3 Theoretical Framework -- 6.4 Methods -- 6.5 Findings -- 6.5.1 How Electronic Medical Records Were Set up for Watching -- 6.5.2 How the Duties of Watching Are Shared Through the Records -- 6.5.3 Privacy, Openness, Secure Communication -- 6.6 Discussion -- 6.7 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 7 Profiling 'Anomalies' and the Anomalies of Profiling: Digitalized Risk Assessments of Dutch Youth and the New European Data Protection Regime -- Abstract -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Overview of the Three Risk Profiling Systems -- 7.2.1 Digital Youth Healthcare Registry -- 7.2.2 Reference Index for High Risk Youth -- 7.2.3 ProKid 12-SI -- 7.2.4 Advantages of DYHR, RI and ProKid -- 7.2.5 Disadvantages of DYHR, RI and ProKid -- 7.3 Profiling Children in Light of Current and New Data Protection Rules -- 7.4 Methodology -- 7.5 Problems Raised by Profiling Systems Generally -- 7.6 Problems or 'Anomalies' Raised by Risk Profiles in Light of the Changes Brought by the GDPR -- 7.6.1 Constructing Risk Profile Data -- 7.6.1.1 What Risk? -- 7.6.1.2 Funding for Registering Risks? -- 7.6.1.3 Unfair Profiling? -- 7.6.2 Using Risk Profile Data -- 7.6.2.1 No Option to Register Improvements -- 7.6.2.2 No Distinction Between Perpetrators, Victims and Suspects -- 7.6.2.3 Risk Profile for a Baby Through Indirect Evidence -- 7.6.2.4 To Share or not to Share (Healthcare Information).
7.6.3 Erasing Risk Profile Data -- 7.6.3.1 Dealing with Erroneous Risk Registration -- 7.6.3.2 Retained Data After Expiration Remains Relevant -- 7.7 Discussion as to the Normative State of the New Data Protection Regime in Light of the Empirical Findings -- 7.8 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 8 Policy, Design and Use of Police-Worn Bodycameras in the Netherlands -- Abstract -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 How to Frame the Bodycamera? -- 8.3 Methods of Inquiry -- 8.4 The Bodycamera According to Policy Makers -- 8.5 The Bodycamera According to Designers -- 8.5.1 Guidelines -- 8.5.2 Description of the Device -- 8.5.3 Transparency of the Device -- 8.5.4 Inscribed Responsibilities -- 8.6 The Bodycamera According to Users -- 8.6.1 Preparing for the Night -- 8.6.2 In the Night -- 8.6.3 After a Night -- 8.7 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Revisiting Key Concepts in the Interplay Between Surveillance and Health -- 9 Ubiquitous Digital Devices and Health: Reflections on Foucault's Notion of the 'Clinic' -- Abstract -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 The 'Clinic' and the Development of Knowledge -- 9.3 Digital Technologies and the Reorganization of the Medical Field -- 9.4 Changing Status of Patients in Relation to Medical Services -- 9.5 Possible Implications for Understanding 'the Clinic' -- References -- 10 Health Data for Common Good: Defining the Boundaries and Social Dilemmas of Data Commons -- Abstract -- 10.1 Introduction: The Rhetoric, Practices and Technology of the Personal (Health) Data Commons -- 10.2 The Commons -- 10.2.1 Origins and Elements of the Commons Paradigm -- 10.2.2 Expansion of the Commons Analytical Framework -- 10.2.2.1 Patterns of Expansion -- 10.2.2.2 Technology and Expansion of the Commons Paradigm -- 10.2.3 The Commons Dilemmas -- 10.3 Constructing (Health) Data Commons -- 10.3.1 Boundaries of the Common Resource.
10.3.1.1 All Personal Data Is Health Data -- 10.3.1.2 All Data Is Potentially Personal Data -- 10.3.1.3 Data as a System Resource, Data Ecosystems, and Group Privacy -- 10.3.2 Provision Dilemma: Interpreting Sustainability in the Data Commons -- 10.3.3 Appropriation Dilemma: Enclosure of Data -- 10.4 Conclusions and Directions for Future Research -- References -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
K1-7720 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4774758 Available EBC4774758

Contents -- 1 Introduction -- References -- Personal Health and Autonomy: An Uneasy Relationship -- 2 Unobtrusiveness in mHealth Design and Use: A Systematic Literature Study -- Abstract -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Method -- 2.3 Results -- 2.3.1 Defining Obtrusiveness and Unobtrusiveness -- 2.3.2 Common Characteristics of Obtrusiveness -- 2.3.3 Implications of Unobtrusiveness -- 2.3.4 Diminishing Obtrusiveness via Personalisation and Control -- 2.4 Analysis -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Bibliography -- 3 eHealth and Privacy in U.S. Employer Wellness Programs -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Employer-Sponsored Wellness Programs -- 3.3 Personal Health Information in Wellness Programs -- 3.4 Privacy, Surveillance and Wellness Programs -- 3.4.1 Informational Privacy -- 3.4.2 Physical Integrity -- 3.4.3 Decisional Autonomy -- 3.5 Conclusions, Recommendations and Further Research -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 4 Use of a Wearable Device to Promote Healthy Behaviors Among Employees of a Small-to-Medium Enterprise in the Netherlands -- Abstract -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Methods -- 4.2.1 The Case -- 4.2.2 Data Collection -- 4.3 Results -- 4.3.1 Fun Gadgets, with Preconditions -- 4.3.2 Initial Expectations: No Personal Health Change, but Team Benefits -- 4.3.3 Experiences: Caloric Input Hassles and Data Accuracy -- Increased Number of Steps -- 4.3.4 Socio-ethical Dilemmas -- 4.4 Discussion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Surveillance Practices for Risk Management -- 5 Selling Passive Monitoring to Manage Risk in Independent Living: Frontline Workers in a Bind -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Methods -- 5.2.1 Participants and Recruitment -- 5.2.2 Data Collection and Analysis -- 5.3 Findings -- 5.3.1 The Remote Monitoring System as Intervention -- 5.3.2 Ambivalence Under Organizational Pressure.

5.3.3 Encouraging Adoption: Bypassing, Moralizing, Appealing to Fear, and Bargaining -- 5.3.3.1 Bypassing the Client -- 5.3.3.2 Moralizing Discourse -- 5.3.3.3 Appealing to Fear -- 5.3.3.4 Bargaining -- 5.3.4 Reluctant Adoption: The Challenge of Selling -- 5.4 Discussion -- 5.5 Limitations and Future Research -- 5.6 Conclusion -- References -- 6 Veillance and Electronic Medical Records in Disease Management Programs in the Netherlands -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Background -- 6.3 Theoretical Framework -- 6.4 Methods -- 6.5 Findings -- 6.5.1 How Electronic Medical Records Were Set up for Watching -- 6.5.2 How the Duties of Watching Are Shared Through the Records -- 6.5.3 Privacy, Openness, Secure Communication -- 6.6 Discussion -- 6.7 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 7 Profiling 'Anomalies' and the Anomalies of Profiling: Digitalized Risk Assessments of Dutch Youth and the New European Data Protection Regime -- Abstract -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Overview of the Three Risk Profiling Systems -- 7.2.1 Digital Youth Healthcare Registry -- 7.2.2 Reference Index for High Risk Youth -- 7.2.3 ProKid 12-SI -- 7.2.4 Advantages of DYHR, RI and ProKid -- 7.2.5 Disadvantages of DYHR, RI and ProKid -- 7.3 Profiling Children in Light of Current and New Data Protection Rules -- 7.4 Methodology -- 7.5 Problems Raised by Profiling Systems Generally -- 7.6 Problems or 'Anomalies' Raised by Risk Profiles in Light of the Changes Brought by the GDPR -- 7.6.1 Constructing Risk Profile Data -- 7.6.1.1 What Risk? -- 7.6.1.2 Funding for Registering Risks? -- 7.6.1.3 Unfair Profiling? -- 7.6.2 Using Risk Profile Data -- 7.6.2.1 No Option to Register Improvements -- 7.6.2.2 No Distinction Between Perpetrators, Victims and Suspects -- 7.6.2.3 Risk Profile for a Baby Through Indirect Evidence -- 7.6.2.4 To Share or not to Share (Healthcare Information).

7.6.3 Erasing Risk Profile Data -- 7.6.3.1 Dealing with Erroneous Risk Registration -- 7.6.3.2 Retained Data After Expiration Remains Relevant -- 7.7 Discussion as to the Normative State of the New Data Protection Regime in Light of the Empirical Findings -- 7.8 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 8 Policy, Design and Use of Police-Worn Bodycameras in the Netherlands -- Abstract -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 How to Frame the Bodycamera? -- 8.3 Methods of Inquiry -- 8.4 The Bodycamera According to Policy Makers -- 8.5 The Bodycamera According to Designers -- 8.5.1 Guidelines -- 8.5.2 Description of the Device -- 8.5.3 Transparency of the Device -- 8.5.4 Inscribed Responsibilities -- 8.6 The Bodycamera According to Users -- 8.6.1 Preparing for the Night -- 8.6.2 In the Night -- 8.6.3 After a Night -- 8.7 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Revisiting Key Concepts in the Interplay Between Surveillance and Health -- 9 Ubiquitous Digital Devices and Health: Reflections on Foucault's Notion of the 'Clinic' -- Abstract -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 The 'Clinic' and the Development of Knowledge -- 9.3 Digital Technologies and the Reorganization of the Medical Field -- 9.4 Changing Status of Patients in Relation to Medical Services -- 9.5 Possible Implications for Understanding 'the Clinic' -- References -- 10 Health Data for Common Good: Defining the Boundaries and Social Dilemmas of Data Commons -- Abstract -- 10.1 Introduction: The Rhetoric, Practices and Technology of the Personal (Health) Data Commons -- 10.2 The Commons -- 10.2.1 Origins and Elements of the Commons Paradigm -- 10.2.2 Expansion of the Commons Analytical Framework -- 10.2.2.1 Patterns of Expansion -- 10.2.2.2 Technology and Expansion of the Commons Paradigm -- 10.2.3 The Commons Dilemmas -- 10.3 Constructing (Health) Data Commons -- 10.3.1 Boundaries of the Common Resource.

10.3.1.1 All Personal Data Is Health Data -- 10.3.1.2 All Data Is Potentially Personal Data -- 10.3.1.3 Data as a System Resource, Data Ecosystems, and Group Privacy -- 10.3.2 Provision Dilemma: Interpreting Sustainability in the Data Commons -- 10.3.3 Appropriation Dilemma: Enclosure of Data -- 10.4 Conclusions and Directions for Future Research -- References -- Index.

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