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The future of crime and punishment : smart policies for reducing crime and saving money / William R. Kelly.

By: Kelly, W. R. (William Robert), 1950- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield, [2016]Description: viii, 258 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781442264816 (cloth : alk. paper); 1442264810 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Crime -- United States | Punishment -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Future of crime and punishmentDDC classification: 364.40973
Contents:
Introduction -- American criminal justice : the punishment is the crime -- The high cost of failure -- Why people commit crime and what we can do about it -- Diversion from traditional criminal prosecution and punishment -- Changing prosecution and sentencing -- Rethinking punishment -- Drugs, guns and gangs -- Juvenile justice : the critical opportunity -- Conclusions.
Summary: Today we know that crime is often not just a matter of making bad decisions. Rather, there are a variety of factors that are implicated in much criminal offending--some fairly obvious, like poverty, mental illness, and drug abuse, and others less so, such as neurocognitive problems. We now have the tools for effective criminal behavioral change, but this cannot be an excuse for criminal offending. In The Future of Crime and Punishment, William R. Kelly identifies the need to educate the public on how these tools can be used to most effectively and cost-efficiently reduce crime, recidivism, victimization, and cost. The justice system of the future needs to be much more collaborative, utilizing the expertise of a variety of disciplines, such as psychology, psychiatry, addiction, and neuroscience. The path forward is one characterized largely by change from traditional criminal prosecution and punishment to venues that balance accountability, compliance, and risk management with behavioral change interventions that address the primary underlying causes for recidivism. There are moving parts to this effort, and it is a complex proposition. It requires substantial changes to law, procedure, decision making, roles and responsibilities, expertise, and funding. Moreover, it requires a radical shift in how we think about crime and punishment. Our thinking needs to reflect a perspective that crime is harmful, but that much criminal behavior is changeable. -- Back cover.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV9950 .K454 2016 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002310597

Includes bibliographical references (pages 241-250) and index.

Introduction -- American criminal justice : the punishment is the crime -- The high cost of failure -- Why people commit crime and what we can do about it -- Diversion from traditional criminal prosecution and punishment -- Changing prosecution and sentencing -- Rethinking punishment -- Drugs, guns and gangs -- Juvenile justice : the critical opportunity -- Conclusions.

Today we know that crime is often not just a matter of making bad decisions. Rather, there are a variety of factors that are implicated in much criminal offending--some fairly obvious, like poverty, mental illness, and drug abuse, and others less so, such as neurocognitive problems. We now have the tools for effective criminal behavioral change, but this cannot be an excuse for criminal offending. In The Future of Crime and Punishment, William R. Kelly identifies the need to educate the public on how these tools can be used to most effectively and cost-efficiently reduce crime, recidivism, victimization, and cost. The justice system of the future needs to be much more collaborative, utilizing the expertise of a variety of disciplines, such as psychology, psychiatry, addiction, and neuroscience. The path forward is one characterized largely by change from traditional criminal prosecution and punishment to venues that balance accountability, compliance, and risk management with behavioral change interventions that address the primary underlying causes for recidivism. There are moving parts to this effort, and it is a complex proposition. It requires substantial changes to law, procedure, decision making, roles and responsibilities, expertise, and funding. Moreover, it requires a radical shift in how we think about crime and punishment. Our thinking needs to reflect a perspective that crime is harmful, but that much criminal behavior is changeable. -- Back cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Between 1972 and 1984, state and federal prison populations doubled. From 1984 to 1992, incarceration doubled again. Then it doubled once more from 1992 to the present. This represents a pinnacle in a sordid kind of way: the land of the free has been for some years now the most punitive nation in modern times. Meanwhile, the recidivist rate is awful. Why has the so-called correctional system gone so wrong? In this brilliant book, Kelly, a sociologist at the University of Texas at Austin, has a lot to say. His book is less about the future of crime and punishment than an analysis of the country's defective status quo. Kelly observes that crime occurrences have complex antecedents--neurological, psychological, and social. Punishment has little utility in reducing crime, he believes. But the recipe for carceral excess has been perfected: choose incarceration as the punishment of choice for a growing list of crimes. Ignore factors like drug and alcohol addiction, mental illness, and intellectual capacity in sentencing. Next, dump offenders in facilities where transformative treatment, if any, is dubious. Then, release offenders to the community without full support. They'll come back; we'll pay. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. --Robert D. McCrie, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Author notes provided by Syndetics

William R. Kelly, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Sociology and director of the Center for Criminology and Criminal Justice Research at the University of Texas at Austin. Kelly is the author and contributor of several books and articles on criminal justice, law, and policy, including Criminal Justice At The Crossroads: Transforming Crime and Punishment (2015)

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