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Theater of a separate war : the Civil War west of the Mississippi River, 1861-1865 / Thomas W. Cutrer.

By: Cutrer, Thomas W [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Littlefield history of the Civil War era: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2017]Description: xiii, 588 pages : map ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeSubject(s): American Civil War (1861-1865) | West (U.S.) -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | Southwest, Old -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | Military campaigns | United States | United States -- Southwest, Old | United States, West | 1861-1865Genre/Form: History.DDC classification: 973.7/3
Contents:
Introduction -- 1. Has it come so soon as this? Secession and Confederate statehood -- 2. I will gladly give my life for a victory: Kansas and Missouri, June-December 1861 -- 3. The wolf is come: war in the Indian nation, 1861-1862 -- 4. The only man in the army that was whipped: the Pea Ridge campaign, February 1862 -- 5. Charge 'em! Damn 'em, charge, charge, charge! The struggle for the Southwest, July 1861-July 1862 -- 6. We are men and braves: Indian warfare in the Far West -- 7. No feeling of mercy or kindness: the Prairie Grove campaign, March 1862-January 1863 -- 8. Hold out till help arrived or until all dead: the capture of Arkansas post, 9-11 January 1863 -- 9. Texas must take her chances: coastal defense and the battle of Galveston, April 1861-January 1863 -- 10. All New England men and of the best material: the federal occupation of south Louisiana, April 1862-April 1863 -- 11. Cannot you do something to operate against them on your side of the river! Milliken's Bend and the campaign for Vicksburg, spring 1863 -- 12. Courage and desperation rarely equaled: the rebel assault on Helena, 4 July 1863 -- 13. Much unmerited loss and suffering: Quantrill's Lawrence raid and the war on the Missouri-Kansas border, 21 August 1863 -- 14. Drive him routed from our soil: the Little Rock campaign, July-October 1863 -- 15. More remarkable than Thermopylae: Texas coastal defense and the battle of Sabine Pass, January 1863-June 1865 -- 16. Our troops should occupy and hold at least a portion of Texas: Banks's overland campaign, July-November 1863 -- 17. The land of coyotes, tarantulas, fandangos, horn-toads, and jack-rabbits: Banks's Texas campaign, October 1863-August 1864 -- 18. No nobler death: the Indian Territory, July 1863-February 1865 -- 19. We must fight them and whip them: Banks's drive toward Shreveport, November 1863-April 1864 -- 20. I am going to fight Banks if he has a million of men! The battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, 8-9 April 1864 -- 21. A brisk and brilliant six weeks' campaign: Steele's Camden expedition and Banks's retreat from Pleasant Hill, April and May 1864 -- 22. Destroy property and recruit men: Price's Missouri raid, August-November 1864 -- 23. Let come what will, we'll fight the Yankees alone: Confederate collapse in the Trans-Mississippi -- Conclusion: a sort of Botany Bay --Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E470.9 .C87 2017 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002309573

Includes bibliographical references (pages 521-564) and index.

Introduction -- 1. Has it come so soon as this? Secession and Confederate statehood -- 2. I will gladly give my life for a victory: Kansas and Missouri, June-December 1861 -- 3. The wolf is come: war in the Indian nation, 1861-1862 -- 4. The only man in the army that was whipped: the Pea Ridge campaign, February 1862 -- 5. Charge 'em! Damn 'em, charge, charge, charge! The struggle for the Southwest, July 1861-July 1862 -- 6. We are men and braves: Indian warfare in the Far West -- 7. No feeling of mercy or kindness: the Prairie Grove campaign, March 1862-January 1863 -- 8. Hold out till help arrived or until all dead: the capture of Arkansas post, 9-11 January 1863 -- 9. Texas must take her chances: coastal defense and the battle of Galveston, April 1861-January 1863 -- 10. All New England men and of the best material: the federal occupation of south Louisiana, April 1862-April 1863 -- 11. Cannot you do something to operate against them on your side of the river! Milliken's Bend and the campaign for Vicksburg, spring 1863 -- 12. Courage and desperation rarely equaled: the rebel assault on Helena, 4 July 1863 -- 13. Much unmerited loss and suffering: Quantrill's Lawrence raid and the war on the Missouri-Kansas border, 21 August 1863 -- 14. Drive him routed from our soil: the Little Rock campaign, July-October 1863 -- 15. More remarkable than Thermopylae: Texas coastal defense and the battle of Sabine Pass, January 1863-June 1865 -- 16. Our troops should occupy and hold at least a portion of Texas: Banks's overland campaign, July-November 1863 -- 17. The land of coyotes, tarantulas, fandangos, horn-toads, and jack-rabbits: Banks's Texas campaign, October 1863-August 1864 -- 18. No nobler death: the Indian Territory, July 1863-February 1865 -- 19. We must fight them and whip them: Banks's drive toward Shreveport, November 1863-April 1864 -- 20. I am going to fight Banks if he has a million of men! The battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, 8-9 April 1864 -- 21. A brisk and brilliant six weeks' campaign: Steele's Camden expedition and Banks's retreat from Pleasant Hill, April and May 1864 -- 22. Destroy property and recruit men: Price's Missouri raid, August-November 1864 -- 23. Let come what will, we'll fight the Yankees alone: Confederate collapse in the Trans-Mississippi -- Conclusion: a sort of Botany Bay --Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

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