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Performing the Victorian : John Ruskin and identity in theater, science, and education / Sharon Aronofsky Weltman.

By: Weltman, Sharon Aronofsky, 1957-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Victorian critical interventions: Publisher: Columbus : Ohio State University Press, ©2007Description: xvi, 177 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780814210550; 0814210554; 9780814291344; 0814291341.Subject(s): Identity (Psychology) in literature | Self in literature | Role playing | Feminism in literatureDDC classification: 828/.809
Contents:
Introduction : Unstable as water -- "Mechanical sheep" and "monstrous powers" : John Ruskin's pantomime reality -- "Pretty Frou-Frou" goes demon dancing : performing species and gender in Ruskin's science -- Playground and playhouse : identity performance in Ruskin's education for girls -- Ruskin and the Wilde life : self and other on the millennial stage -- Conclusion : queering Ruskin.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR5267.I35 W46 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002312270

Includes bibliographical references (pages 147-163) and index.

Introduction : Unstable as water -- "Mechanical sheep" and "monstrous powers" : John Ruskin's pantomime reality -- "Pretty Frou-Frou" goes demon dancing : performing species and gender in Ruskin's science -- Playground and playhouse : identity performance in Ruskin's education for girls -- Ruskin and the Wilde life : self and other on the millennial stage -- Conclusion : queering Ruskin.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Ruskin's idiosyncratic writing has attracted many astute critics during the last quarter century, Weltman (Louisiana State Univ.) among them; her outstanding Ruskin's Mythic Queen (CH, Sep'99, 37-0186) looked at women and mythology. The present title examines, for the first time, Ruskin's writing about theater. This is no ordinary drama criticism. Ruskin expresses his fascination with "performance identities" that challenge conventional categories of gender, race, nationality, even species. Weltman discusses Ruskin's avid eye for the spectacle and seduction of performance--whether opera, theater, pantomime, or dance--as yet another facet of his abnormally heightened consciousness. His yearning for transcendence of self is seen even in his Winnington Hall lectures for girls, which urged identification with jewels and inanimate nature. His own "enigmatic" sexual identity, Weltman believes, is the dynamic of his imaginative life. In the last chapter, she assesses various inadequate stage representations of Ruskin along with Oscar Wilde's comparable fixation on identity. Despite some verbal ambiguities, this well-argued, convincing study establishes Ruskin's thought about theater not only as an important part of his historical legacy but also as unexpectedly relevant to modern critical discussions of mind and epistemology. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty. A. R. Vogeler emeritus, California State University, Fullerton

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sharon Aronofsky Weltman is an associate professor of English at Louisiana State University.

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