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In pursuit of privilege : a history of New York City's upper class & the making of a Metropolis / Clifton Hood.

By: Hood, Clifton [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2017]Copyright date: ß2017Description: 1 online resource (xviii, 488 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 023154295X; 9780231542951.Other title: Upper class and the making of New York City, since 1753.Subject(s): Upper class -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | Elite (Social sciences) -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | Rich people -- New York (State) -- New York -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 974.7 LOC classification: F128.3 | .H68 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: The upper class is a foreign country -- "The best mart on the continent:" The 1750s and 1760s -- Uncertain adjustments: The 1780s and 1790s -- Immense wealth: The 1820s & beyond -- All for the union: The 1860s -- A dynamic businessmen's aristocracy: The 1890s -- The ways of millionaireville: The 1890s -- Making spaces of their own: The 1940s -- The anti-elitist elite: the 1970s & beyond -- Conclusion: The limits of anti-elitism.
Subject: "Clifton Hood traces the history of the elite class of New York City and the institutions they created in their relentless pursuit of privilege. While they were responsible for the creation of intuitions such as Columbia University, the New York Public Library system, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and provided skilled leadership in eras of immense turmoil, the idea of a privileged class clashes with the American democratic ideal. And, in fact, this upper class clashed with the rising professional class of bankers, lawyers, and other executives who increasingly rose in prestige and power as time rolled on. In Pursuit of Privilege traces the history of this elite class over two centuries, focusing on decades of upheaval and great change (such as the wars of the 1780s, 1860s, 1940s and the urban upheaval in the 1820s and 1970s), and argues the upper class was not born in the Gilded Age, but that the late nineteenth century was one of many periods where the elites wielded great power and influence and profoundly shaped, for better and for worse, the history of New York and America."--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F128.3 .H68 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/hood17216 Available ocn962064390

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Introduction: The upper class is a foreign country -- "The best mart on the continent:" The 1750s and 1760s -- Uncertain adjustments: The 1780s and 1790s -- Immense wealth: The 1820s & beyond -- All for the union: The 1860s -- A dynamic businessmen's aristocracy: The 1890s -- The ways of millionaireville: The 1890s -- Making spaces of their own: The 1940s -- The anti-elitist elite: the 1970s & beyond -- Conclusion: The limits of anti-elitism.

"Clifton Hood traces the history of the elite class of New York City and the institutions they created in their relentless pursuit of privilege. While they were responsible for the creation of intuitions such as Columbia University, the New York Public Library system, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and provided skilled leadership in eras of immense turmoil, the idea of a privileged class clashes with the American democratic ideal. And, in fact, this upper class clashed with the rising professional class of bankers, lawyers, and other executives who increasingly rose in prestige and power as time rolled on. In Pursuit of Privilege traces the history of this elite class over two centuries, focusing on decades of upheaval and great change (such as the wars of the 1780s, 1860s, 1940s and the urban upheaval in the 1820s and 1970s), and argues the upper class was not born in the Gilded Age, but that the late nineteenth century was one of many periods where the elites wielded great power and influence and profoundly shaped, for better and for worse, the history of New York and America."--Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Effectively placing his book in New York City's changing historical and socioeconomic context, historian Hood (Hobart and William Smith Colleges) traces the city's emerging, evolving upper classes from the 1750s to the present. Utilizing a scaffolding format, he analyzes the changing city and its elite at seven pivotal periods (1750s, 1780s, 1820s, 1860s, 1890s, 1940s, 1970s) and contrasts New York's elites with those in Boston, Philadelphia, and elsewhere. New York grew much larger than these other cities, as did its upper class, which became more diverse and materialistic. The origins of New York's upper class changed from the Colonial period's merchant elite to the Gilded Age's enormously wealthy, self-made industrialists to post-WW II corporate elites. Industrial elites resided on the Upper East Side and formed extensive exclusive social organizations; corporate elites tended toward the suburbs and eschewed the older elites' social organizations. Attacking their predecessors' elitism, corporate elites emphasized a class based on merit. This egalitarian critique, Hood finds, became the basis for a new upper class. Though the roles of land speculation, income taxes, and the Great Depression need more attention, this is a very-well-written, organized, extensively researched study that makes significant contributions to urban, social class, and US history. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --James Borchert, Cleveland State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Clifton Hood is professor of history at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He is the author of 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York (1993), and his work has appeared in the Journal of Urban History, Journal of Social History, Reviews in American History, and the New York Times.

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