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Modernity and the Great Depression : the transformation of American society, 1930-1941 / Kenneth J. Bindas.

By: Bindas, Kenneth J [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Culture America: Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2017Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700624010; 0700624015.Subject(s): Civilization, ModernAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Modernity and the Great Depression.DDC classification: 973.916 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Order, planning, and reason -- The end of times: defining modernity in the 1930s -- A new model army: the Civilian Conservation Corps, the National Youth Administration, and modernity -- Salvation awaits: expositions, world's fairs, and modernity -- A woman's place, a family's hearth: interior decorators and modernity -- Sounds for the Modern Age: music as celebration of modernity -- Epilogue: new directions and challenges: the postwar divide.
Summary: Order, planning, and reason-in the depths of the Great Depression, with the nation teetering on the brink of collapse, this was what was needed. And this, Kenneth J. Bindas suggests, was what the ideas and ideals of modernity offered-a way to make sense of the chaos all around. InModernity and the Great Depression, Bindas offers a new perspective on the provenance and power of modernist thought and practice in early twentieth-century America.In the midst of a terrible economic, social, and political crisis, modernism provided an alternative to the response of many traditional moralists and religious leaders. Promoting a faith based in reason, organization, and planning, modernists espoused a salvation that was not eternal but rather temporal, tangible, and, for a generation with so little to hold onto, eminently practical-one that found virtue in pleasure and private pursuits. After surveying the contested definitional terrain of "modernism" and "modernity," Bindas tracks their course and influence through such government programs as the Civilian Conservation Corps and the National Youth Administration; in the massive American Expositions and World's Fairs that heralded progress and a better future; on the efforts of women interior decorators to update and enhance the comforts of the modern home; and-thanks to the proliferation of electricity and radio-on the popular and high-culture musical recordings and broadcasts that reinforced a shift away from traditional modes of performance and reception.In the transformation he describes, Bindas also locates the limits of modernism's influence, as later generations confronted the spiritual shortcomings of its ultra-rationalist and materialist paradigm.-- Provided by Publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E169.1 .B4974 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1mtz762 Available ocn978352149

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Order, planning, and reason -- The end of times: defining modernity in the 1930s -- A new model army: the Civilian Conservation Corps, the National Youth Administration, and modernity -- Salvation awaits: expositions, world's fairs, and modernity -- A woman's place, a family's hearth: interior decorators and modernity -- Sounds for the Modern Age: music as celebration of modernity -- Epilogue: new directions and challenges: the postwar divide.

Print version record.

Order, planning, and reason-in the depths of the Great Depression, with the nation teetering on the brink of collapse, this was what was needed. And this, Kenneth J. Bindas suggests, was what the ideas and ideals of modernity offered-a way to make sense of the chaos all around. InModernity and the Great Depression, Bindas offers a new perspective on the provenance and power of modernist thought and practice in early twentieth-century America.In the midst of a terrible economic, social, and political crisis, modernism provided an alternative to the response of many traditional moralists and religious leaders. Promoting a faith based in reason, organization, and planning, modernists espoused a salvation that was not eternal but rather temporal, tangible, and, for a generation with so little to hold onto, eminently practical-one that found virtue in pleasure and private pursuits. After surveying the contested definitional terrain of "modernism" and "modernity," Bindas tracks their course and influence through such government programs as the Civilian Conservation Corps and the National Youth Administration; in the massive American Expositions and World's Fairs that heralded progress and a better future; on the efforts of women interior decorators to update and enhance the comforts of the modern home; and-thanks to the proliferation of electricity and radio-on the popular and high-culture musical recordings and broadcasts that reinforced a shift away from traditional modes of performance and reception.In the transformation he describes, Bindas also locates the limits of modernism's influence, as later generations confronted the spiritual shortcomings of its ultra-rationalist and materialist paradigm.-- Provided by Publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a thoughtful, wonderfully well-researched, and cogently written study. The author defines modernity and keeps its development and changes always in view, though he provides an abundance of supporting evidence throughout. Major programs, such as the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), are a prominent part of the story, as are concerns often given less attention, such as women's rights and music and the arts. Bindas (Kent State Univ.) discusses the expositions and world's fairs of this era in a chapter entitled "Salvation Awaits: Expositions, World's Fairs, and Modernity." This brought back to this reviewer, then five years old, a family visit to the New York World's Fair in 1940. The concluding section, "Epilogue: New Directions and Challenges," notes some issues and topics that might be more fully developed in another volume. An excellent, thorough study that merits careful reading. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Paul L. Silver, Johnson State College

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