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The case of the incapacitated capitals / by Robin Pulver ; illustrated by Lynn Rowe Reed.

By: Pulver, Robin.
Contributor(s): Reed, Lynn Rowe [illustrator.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Holiday House, c 2012Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780823424023; 0823424022.Subject(s): Alphabet -- Juvenile fiction | Teachers -- Juvenile fiction | Schools -- Juvenile fiction | Alphabet -- Fiction | Teachers -- Fiction | Schools -- Fiction | Alphabet | Schools | Teachers | Alphabet -- Juvenile fiction | Teachers -- Juvenile fiction | Schools -- Juvenile fiction | Alphabet -- Fiction | Teachers -- Fiction | Schools -- FictionGenre/Form: Fiction. | Juvenile works.DDC classification: [E] LOC classification: PZ7.P97325 | Cas 2012Summary: Capital letters are being so neglected in Mr. Wright's classroom that they are nearly incapacitated, and a medical team must be summoned to perform CPR-- Capital Posture Repair.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Easy Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Easy Fiction Area
P981CA (Browse shelf) Available 0000002309615

Capital letters are being so neglected in Mr. Wright's classroom that they are nearly incapacitated, and a medical team must be summoned to perform CPR-- Capital Posture Repair.

Elementary Grade.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Pulver and Reed add to their children's grammar franchise by teaching the rules of capitalization. Mr. Wright's students have stopped using uppercase letters (he alludes to texting as a possible cause), and so they have become weakened through underuse-"incapacitated." In the course of correcting a letter they have written to the principal, the students (and readers) learn all the ways that capital letters are used in properly written English. Reed's childlike gouache, acrylic, and collage illustrations are charming and feature speech bubbles of running commentary-always a hit with children, but a challenge for a read-aloud. Every capital letter in the text and speech bubbles is prominently featured in colored font. There are a couple of instances in which the author has chosen to use ellipses instead of starting a new sentence (so as to avoid an uppercase letter) and this could confuse readers. An addendum gives a history of capital letters, notes on correspondence, and a list of capitalization rules. An additional purchase for those libraries that circulate the series.-Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robin Pulver is a popular picture book author whose website is robinpulver.com. She lives in upstate New York.<br> <br> Lynn Rowe Reed writes and illustrates picture books and lives in Indiana. You can visit her website at lynnrowereed.com

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