Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The sellout / Paul Beatty.

By: Beatty, Paul [author.].
Material type: TextTextEdition: First edition.Description: 288 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780374260507; 0374260508; 9781250083258; 1250083257.Subject(s): Fathers and sons -- Fiction | Race relations -- FictionAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Sellout.DDC classification: 813/.54 Other classification: FIC019000 | FIC049000 | FIC019000 | FIC019000 Awards: National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction, 2015.Summary: "Raised in the "agrarian ghetto" of Dickens, on the southern outskirts of Los Angeles, the narrator of The Sellout resigned himself to the fate of lower-middle-class Californians: "I'd die in the same bedroom I'd grown up in, looking up at the cracks in the stucco ceiling that've been there since the '68 quake." Raised by a single father, a controversial sociologist, he spent his childhood as the subject in racially charged psychological studies. He is led to believe that his father's pioneering work will result in a memoir that will solve his family's financial woes. But when his father is killed in a police shoot-out, he realizes there never was a memoir. All that's left is the bill for a drive-thru funeral. Fuelled by this deceit and the general disrepair of his hometown, the narrator sets out to right another wrong: Dickens has literally been removed from the map to save California further embarrassment. Enlisting the help of the town's most famous resident--the last surviving Little Rascal, Hominy Jenkins, he initiates the most extreme action conceivable: reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school, which lands him in front of the Supreme Court--Jacket flap.Summary: "A biting satire about a young man's isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court"--
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3552.E19 S45 2015 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002310027

"Raised in the "agrarian ghetto" of Dickens, on the southern outskirts of Los Angeles, the narrator of The Sellout resigned himself to the fate of lower-middle-class Californians: "I'd die in the same bedroom I'd grown up in, looking up at the cracks in the stucco ceiling that've been there since the '68 quake." Raised by a single father, a controversial sociologist, he spent his childhood as the subject in racially charged psychological studies. He is led to believe that his father's pioneering work will result in a memoir that will solve his family's financial woes. But when his father is killed in a police shoot-out, he realizes there never was a memoir. All that's left is the bill for a drive-thru funeral. Fuelled by this deceit and the general disrepair of his hometown, the narrator sets out to right another wrong: Dickens has literally been removed from the map to save California further embarrassment. Enlisting the help of the town's most famous resident--the last surviving Little Rascal, Hominy Jenkins, he initiates the most extreme action conceivable: reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school, which lands him in front of the Supreme Court--Jacket flap.

"A biting satire about a young man's isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court"--

National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction, 2015.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Dickens, CA, is so embarrassing yet so inconsequential that it has disappeared from the map. One of its residents is Professor Mee, who teaches sociology at Riverside Community College. As a single parent, he homeschools his son while using him in a radical social science experiment with racial implications that might someday result in a profitable book. After Mee is killed in a police shoot-out, the son draws on what he has learned about sociology to launch a crusade that he hopes will put Dickens back on the map. To bring the town some national attention, he resorts to the shocking means of reinstituting slavery and segregation. While he seems to succeed, his actions ultimately bring him before the U.S. Supreme Court, which must consider the ramifications of the case. VERDICT Beatty (The White Boy Shuffle) creates a wicked satire that pokes fun at all that is sacred to life in the United States, from father-son dynamics right up to the Supreme Court. His story is full of the unexpected, resulting in absurd and hilarious drama.-Joanna Burkhardt, Univ. of Rhode Island Libs., Providence (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Paul Beatty was born in Los Angeles, California in 1962. He received an MFA in creative writing from Brooklyn College and an MA in psychology from Boston University. In 1990, he became the first Grand Poetry Slam Champion of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe. One of the prizes for winning was the book deal, which resulted in his first collection of poetry, Big Bank Takes Little Bank. His novels include The White Boy Shuffle, Tuff, and Slumberland. The Sellout won the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award in Fiction and the 2016 Man Booker Prize for Fiction. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.