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Blood in the water : the Attica prison uprising of 1971 and its legacy / Heather Ann Thompson.

By: Thompson, Heather Ann, 1963- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon Books, [2016]Edition: First edition.Description: xvii, 724 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780375423222 (hardback); 0375423222 (hardback).Subject(s): Prison riots -- New York (State)DDC classification: 365/.974793 Other classification: HIS036060 | LAW026000 | POL014000
Contents:
Introduction: State secrets -- The tinderbox: Frank "Big Black" Smith -- Power and politics unleashed: Michael Smith -- The sound before the fury: Tom Wicker -- Retribution and reprisals unimagined: Tony Strollo -- Reckonings and reactions: Robert Douglass -- Inquiries and diversions: Anthony Simonetti -- Justice on trial: Ernest Goodman -- Blowing the whistle: Malcolm Bell -- David and Goliath: Elizabeth Fink -- A final fight: Deanne Quinn Miller.
Awards: Bancroft Prize in American History and Diplomacy, 2017 | Finalist, National Book Award for Nonfiction, 2016Summary: "Historian Heather Ann Thompson offers the first definitive telling of the Attica prison uprising, the state's violent response, and the victims' decades-long quest for justice--in time for the forty-fifth anniversary of the events"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV9475.N716 T46 2016 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002310092

Includes bibliographical references (pages 579-684) and index.

"Historian Heather Ann Thompson offers the first definitive telling of the Attica prison uprising, the state's violent response, and the victims' decades-long quest for justice--in time for the forty-fifth anniversary of the events"-- Provided by publisher.

Introduction: State secrets -- The tinderbox: Frank "Big Black" Smith -- Power and politics unleashed: Michael Smith -- The sound before the fury: Tom Wicker -- Retribution and reprisals unimagined: Tony Strollo -- Reckonings and reactions: Robert Douglass -- Inquiries and diversions: Anthony Simonetti -- Justice on trial: Ernest Goodman -- Blowing the whistle: Malcolm Bell -- David and Goliath: Elizabeth Fink -- A final fight: Deanne Quinn Miller.

Bancroft Prize in American History and Diplomacy, 2017

Finalist, National Book Award for Nonfiction, 2016

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Even after 45 years, the uprising at the New York State prison in Attica holds its fascination. In September 1971, the inmates took over the prison for four days until Gov. Nelson Rockefeller sent in troops to quell it. In the course of events, 43 inmates and guards were killed and many personal stories evolved. In contrast to the far shorter version by Tom Wicker (A Time To Die), Thompson's (history, Univ. of Michigan; Whose Detroit?) full-length account begins with the warning signs that were ignored, a day-to-day chronicle of the uprising, and for most of the book, details of the aftermath of political repercussions. Readers beware: it is a mammoth volume, with no letup of material. For the most part, Thompson is on the side of the inmates, but she does acknowledge that the guards were victims, too. Furthermore, she brings to light the most subtle forms of government corruption within the prison system. All in all, a dramatic retelling of a memorable event in our history and a cry for justice in the face of institutional authority. Verdict A must for anyone involved in the criminal justice system; also for the general reader interested in prisons with a lot of time on their hands.-Frances O. Sandiford, formerly with Green Haven Correctional Facility Lib., Stormville, NY © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Thompson (Univ. of Michigan) has written a powerful, balanced account of the inhuman conditions that sparked the 1971 Attica prison riot, the agonizing days of negotiations when the inmates demanded to be treated as human beings, and the prison's armed retaking by New York State troopers and correction officers--despite both sides' wishes for continuing negotiations. A hail of bullets killed 29 inmates and 10 hostages, and wounded over 100 others. Following the retaking, surviving inmates suffered brutal physical, psychological, and racial abuse from both correctional officers and state police. Thompson's impeccable research and writing repulses and sickens readers as she recounts horrific descriptions of inhumanity. She chronicles the next 30 years as first inmates and then hostages or their families sought legal redress from a broken system. Throughout, New York State has remained steadfast in its refusal to accept responsibility. Whether one believes the inmates got what they deserved or that the armed assault was totally unnecessary, readers will find Thompson's objectivity beyond remarkable. Although conditions at Attica are worse today, the author remains hopeful as prisoners continue to struggle for humane treatment. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. --Duncan R. Jamieson, Ashland University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Heather Ann Thompson received a bachelor's degree and master's degree from the University of Michigan and a PhD from Princeton University in 1995. Before joining the faculty of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 2015, she taught history at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte from 1997 to 2009 and at Temple University from 2009 to 2015. She has written about the history of policing, mass incarceration, and the current criminal justice system for The New York Times, Newsweek, Time, The Atlantic, Salon, Dissent, NBC, New Labor Forum, The Daily Beast, and The Huffington Post. Her books include Whose Detroit?: Politics, Labor, and Race in a Modern American City and Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971, which won the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2017. She is also the editor of Speaking Out: Activism and Protest in the 1960s and 1970s. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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