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Falling back : incarceration and transitions to adulthood among urban youth / Jamie J. Fader.

By: Fader, Jamie J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Critical issues in crime and society: Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, ©2013Description: xiv, 256 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780813560755; 0813560756.Subject(s): Juvenile delinquents -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia | Juvenile delinquents -- Rehabilitation -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia | Juvenile corrections -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia | Juvenile justice, Administration of -- Pennsylvania -- PhiladelphiaDDC classification: 365/.420974811
Contents:
No love for the brothers : youth incarceration and reentry in Philadelphia -- "Because that is the way you are" : predictions of failure and cultural assaults inside Mountain Ridge Academy -- "You can take me outta the 'hood, but you can't take the 'hood outta me" : the experience of "reform" at Mountain Ridge Academy -- "Nothing's changed but me" : reintegration plans meet the inner city -- "I'm not a momma's boy, I'm my own boy" : employment, hustling, and masculinity -- "I just wanna see a part of me that's never been bad' : family, fatherhood, and further offending -- "I'm finally becoming the person I always wanted to be" : masculine identity, social support, and falling back -- "I got some unfinished business" : fictions of success at Mountain Ridge Academy's graduation ceremony.
Summary: "Jamie J. Fader documents the transition to adulthood for a particularly vulnerable population: young inner-city men of color who have, by the age of eighteen, already been imprisoned. How, she asks, do such precariously situated youth become adult men? What are the sources of change in their lives? Falling Back is based on over three years of ethnographic research with black and Latino males on the cusp of adulthood and incarcerated at a rural reform school designed to address 'criminal thinking errors' among juvenile drug offenders. Fader observed these young men as they transitioned back to their urban Philadelphia neighborhoods, resuming their daily lives and struggling to adopt adult masculine roles. This in-depth ethnographic approach allowed her to portray the complexities of human decision-making as these men strove to 'fall back, ' or avoid reoffending, and become productive adults. Her work makes a unique contribution to sociological understandings of the transitions to adulthood, urban social inequality, prisoner reentry, and desistance from offending."--Back cover.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV9106.P5 F33 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002311884

Includes bibliographical references and index.

No love for the brothers : youth incarceration and reentry in Philadelphia -- "Because that is the way you are" : predictions of failure and cultural assaults inside Mountain Ridge Academy -- "You can take me outta the 'hood, but you can't take the 'hood outta me" : the experience of "reform" at Mountain Ridge Academy -- "Nothing's changed but me" : reintegration plans meet the inner city -- "I'm not a momma's boy, I'm my own boy" : employment, hustling, and masculinity -- "I just wanna see a part of me that's never been bad' : family, fatherhood, and further offending -- "I'm finally becoming the person I always wanted to be" : masculine identity, social support, and falling back -- "I got some unfinished business" : fictions of success at Mountain Ridge Academy's graduation ceremony.

"Jamie J. Fader documents the transition to adulthood for a particularly vulnerable population: young inner-city men of color who have, by the age of eighteen, already been imprisoned. How, she asks, do such precariously situated youth become adult men? What are the sources of change in their lives? Falling Back is based on over three years of ethnographic research with black and Latino males on the cusp of adulthood and incarcerated at a rural reform school designed to address 'criminal thinking errors' among juvenile drug offenders. Fader observed these young men as they transitioned back to their urban Philadelphia neighborhoods, resuming their daily lives and struggling to adopt adult masculine roles. This in-depth ethnographic approach allowed her to portray the complexities of human decision-making as these men strove to 'fall back, ' or avoid reoffending, and become productive adults. Her work makes a unique contribution to sociological understandings of the transitions to adulthood, urban social inequality, prisoner reentry, and desistance from offending."--Back cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This exemplary book addresses the "complex and manifold character" of urban delinquent behavior. The author is guided by pioneering sociologists who crafted approaches to unraveling and understanding the everyday lives of urban African American youth (e.g., John Laub and Robert Sampson, Shared Beginnings, Divergent Lives: Delinquent Boys to Age 70, CH, Jul'04, 41-6858). Fader (criminal justice, Univ. of Albany, SUNY) draws upon her academic training and professional experience to clearly articulate her methodological approach, enriched by informative case studies of the youth. The introduction draws one into observations of everyday life in an urban center. Readers move inside youthful experiences encountered in incarceration--daily struggles with counselors, other youth, and "code" normative standards. Subsequent chapters vividly portray personal and social identity struggles and expose the myths associated with the lives of urban youth and the deterministic outcome of death or incarceration. Later chapters reveal the conflict arising from attempts to take on adult roles, hopes, personal goals, and the reality of urban ghettoes. The last chapter chronicles the outcome of efforts to escape stereotypical self-fulfilling prophecies and attempts of youth to become more than marginal members of the urban community. A significant contribution to understanding delinquency, demanding attention by decision makers. Excellent footnotes and bibliography. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. J. H. Larson emeritus, University of North Dakota

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>JAMIE J. FADER is an assistant professor of criminal justice at Temple University.</p>

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