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Towards Learning and Instruction in Web 3.0 : Advances in Cognitive and Educational Psychology.

By: Isaias, Pedro.
Contributor(s): Ifenthaler, Dirk | Kinshuk | Sampson, Demetrios G | Spector, J. Michael.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York, NY : Springer New York, 2012Copyright date: ©2012Description: 1 online resource (333 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781461415398.Subject(s): Computer-assisted instruction -- Congresses | Educational technology | World Wide WebGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Towards Learning and Instruction in Web 3.0 : Advances in Cognitive and Educational PsychologyDDC classification: 371.3344678 LOC classification: L1-991Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Towards Learning and Instruction in Web 3.0 -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction: Is Web 3.0 Changing Learning and Instruction? -- Introduction -- Web Generations -- Implications for Learning and Instruction -- Future Perspectives -- References -- Contents -- Contributors -- Part I: Student-Centered Learning -- Chapter 1: Facilitating Learning Through Dynamic Student Modelling of Learning Styles -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Architecture for Dynamic Student Modelling -- 2.1 Static Student Modelling Module -- 2.2 Notification Mechanism -- 2.3 Dynamic Student Modelling Module -- 2.4 Learning Style Calculation Module -- 2.5 Data Extraction Module -- 2.6 Dynamic Analysis Module -- 2.7 Student Model -- 3 Application of the Architecture in a Learning System -- 3.1 Course Structure and Available Behaviour Patterns -- 3.2 Providing Adaptive Feedback Based on Learning Styles -- 4 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 2: SQAR: An Annotation-Based Study Process to Enhance the Learner's Personal Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The Annotation Practice -- 3 Learner's Personnel Annotation -- 4 Web Annotation Tools -- 5 SQAR Process: An Annotation Based Pedagogical Process -- 5.1 Learner's Personal Annotation Formalism -- 5.2 Architecture of SQAR Process -- 5.3 Modeling of SQAR Process -- 6 Webannot a Prototype of PAML -- 7 Experimentation -- 7.1 Participants, Materials and Method -- 8 Results -- 9 Discussion -- 10 Related Work -- 11 Conclusion and Future Work -- References -- Chapter 3: Online Formative Assessment in a Medical PBL-Curriculum -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Method -- 3 Results -- 3.1 Current FAs -- 3.2 Future Online FA: Students' and Lecturers' Expectations -- 4 Discussion -- 5 Outlook -- 5.1 Requirements for Online FAs -- 5.2 Creating a Didactic Metadata Layer -- 6 Conclusion -- References.
Chapter 4: The Effect of Project Based Web 2.0-Learning on Students' Outcomes -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Project-Based Learning and Informal Learning -- 3 Community-Based Project Management Learning Model -- 4 Web-Based Learning System: PHD-LAB as a Social Community Project Management System -- 5 Learning Content and Activities via PHD-LAB -- 6 Aim of this Study and Hypothesis -- 6.1 Hypothesis 1: Learners' Performance Between Groups -- 6.2 Hypothesis 2: Learners' Attitude Between Groups -- 7 Method -- 7.1 Research Design -- 7.2 Data Collection -- 7.3 Reliability of Rubrics -- 7.4 Attitude Scale -- 7.5 Reliability of Attitude Scale -- 8 Results and Discussion -- 8.1 Hypothesis 1: Learner Performance Between Groups -- 8.2 Hypothesis 2: Learners' Attitude Between Groups -- 8.2.1 Attitude Towards CBPM Learning Model -- 8.2.2 Outcomes of Learning: Writing of the Final Report -- 8.2.3 Attitude Towards Future Work of PHD-LAB System -- 9 Conclusion -- References -- Part II: Collaborative Learning -- Chapter 5: Collaborative Language Learning Game as a Device Independent Application -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Pedagogical Concept -- 2 Description of the Game -- 2.1 Description of the Game States -- 2.1.1 Wait/Idle State -- 2.1.2 Write State -- 2.1.3 Dispute State -- 2.1.4 Vote State -- 2.1.5 End of the Game and Rewarding Procedure -- 2.2 Framework of the Game -- 3 Analysis of the Test Result -- 4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Collaborative Learning Tools in Higher Education and Life-Long Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Low-Cost Architecture -- 3 CSCL Prototype for Improving the Educational Act -- 4 Fixing Problems in CSCL Environments -- 4.1 Issues Regarding the Academic Staff -- 4.2 Responsibilities of Learning -- 4.3 Educational Content -- 4.4 Interaction -- 5 Deployment and Customization -- 6 Conclusions -- References.
Part III: Technology, Learning and Expertise -- Chapter 7: Technologies and the Assessment of Higher Order Outcomes -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Method -- 3 Results -- 3.1 Respondents' Curriculum Design -- 3.2 Teaching Activities -- 3.3 Assessment Tasks -- 4 Analysis -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 8: Visual Algorithm Simulation Exercises with Authentic Data Sets -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 2.1 Semantic Web and Web Mashups -- 2.2 Learning Graph Algorithms -- 3 Visual Algorithm Simulation Exercises with Authentic Data -- 3.1 Visual Algorithm Simulation -- 3.2 Location Data Algorithm Simulation Exercises -- 3.3 Technology -- 3.4 Teacher's Point of View -- 4 First Experiences with Students -- 4.1 Feedback Questionnaire -- 5 Conclusions -- 5.1 Future Directions -- Appendix A Data-sets used by students -- References -- Chapter 9: E-Mentoring in Vocational Teacher Education -- 1 Introduction -- 2 E-Mentoring and Teacher Education -- 2.1 The Motivate Project -- 2.2 The ASSOCiate Online Project -- 2.3 The Synchronous Coaching Project -- 3 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 10: The IPTEACES E-Learning Framework: Success Indicators, the Impact on Student Social Demographic Characteristics and the Assessment of Effectiveness -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Overview of IPTEACES Framework -- 3 Overview of Student's Demographic Characteristics and Success Indicators -- 3.1 Brief Characterization of Student's Demographic Indicators -- 3.2 Brief Characterization of Success Indicators: Approvals, Failures, Drop-outs and Evaluation of Satisfaction -- 4 Analysis of the Final Scores Through the Use of Regression Trees -- 4.1 Insurance Industry -- 4.2 Banking Industry -- 5 Measuring the Effectiveness of EPTEACES E-Learning Framework: The Case Study of Insurance Intermediaries Certification Course.
5.1 "Value-Satisfaction Grid" and "Learners' Value Index of Satisfaction" (LeVIS index) -- 6 Assessing the Effectiveness of IPTEACES E-learning Framework (N=1317) -- 6.1 Overall LeVIS index: The Effectiveness of EPTEALAS e-Learning Framework -- 7 Overall Value-Satisfaction Grid of the 41 E-Learning System Characteristics' (All Dimensions) -- 8 Conclusions -- Appendix I -- References -- Part IV: Toward Web 3.0 in Education -- Chapter 11: Key-Roles in VLEs: A Metric Based on Social Network Analysis -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Cross and Prusak's Key-Roles in VLEs -- 2.1 Central Connectors (CCs) -- 2.2 Boundary Spanners (BSs) -- 2.3 Information Brokers (IBs) -- 2.4 Peripheral Specialists (PSs) -- 3 Comparing Two Different Representation Methods of Knowledge Flows in VLEs -- 4 A Metric for Key-Roles Identification in VLEs -- 5 Case Study -- 5.1 Data -- 5.2 Results -- 5.3 Educational Hints for the Teaching Strategy -- 6 Conclusions and Future Developments -- References -- Chapter 12: First on the List: Search Engine Optimization Contests as Authentic Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Search Engines and Search Engine Optimization -- 3 SEO Contests as an Authentic Learning -- 4 Assessment of SEO Contest as Authentic Learning -- 5 Lessons Learned -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13: Teachers' Training in Exploiting 3D Virtual Worlds for Teaching and Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 3D Virtual Worlds Key Concepts for Teaching and Learning -- 3 Proposed Module for Teachers' CPD -- 3.1 Competence Description (Novice Level) of Teachers Capable of Teaching in 3D Virtual Worlds -- 3.2 Educational Objectives Related to the Proposed Competence Description -- 3.3 Instructional Strategy of the proposed Module for Teachers' CPD Programmes -- 3.4 Design of the Assessment Activities -- 3.5 Overview of the Proposed Module -- 4 Conclusions -- References.
Chapter 14: Individual Differences in Different Level Mental Rotation Tasks: An Eye Movement Study -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Mental Rotation Ability (MRA) as an Individual Difference -- 1.2 Eye Movements in the Mental Rotation Process -- 1.3 Purpose of Study -- 2 Method -- 2.1 Study Group -- 2.2 Data Collection Tools -- 2.3 Data Analysis -- 3 Findings -- 3.1 Completion Time Across Different Mental Rotation Ability Groups -- 3.2 Eye Movements Across Different MRA Levels During Tangram Problem Solving -- 3.2.1 Differences Across Different MRA Levels in Easy Level Tangram Problem -- 3.2.2 Differences Across Different MRA Levels in Difficult Level Tangram Problem -- 4 Conclusion -- 5 Future Work -- References -- Part V: Exploratory Technologies -- Chapter 15: Supporting Motivation Based Educational Games Through Web 3.0 -- 1 Introduction -- 2 State of the Art -- 2.1 Motivation -- 2.1.1 Theories of Motivation -- Self-Efficacy Theory -- Self-Determination Theory -- 2.1.2 Motivation in e-Learning -- 2.2 Educational Games -- 2.3 Web 3.0 Based e-Learning and Games -- 3 Describing Motivation in Educational Games Through Web 3.0 -- 3.1 Assessment of Motivation in Educational Games -- 3.2 Describing Learner Motivation Level Through Metadata -- 4 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 16: Learning from Incorrect Answers on Multiple Choice Tests -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Theoretical Framework for Testing and Assessment -- 1.2 Piaget, Vygotsky, and Gardner: Frameworks for Development and Learning -- 2 Presenting Selection Dynamics Visually -- 2.1 Mathematics: Standard Expectation (All ¬A Answers Are "Guesses") -- 2.2 Science: Standard Expectation (All ¬A Answers "Guesses") -- 3 Crossover -- 3.1 Mathematics: (All ¬A Answers Functioning) -- 3.2 Science: (All Alternatives Functioning) -- 4 Starting at the Same Point -- 4.1 Mathematics: (All Alternatives Functioning).
4.2 Science: (All Alternatives Functioning).
Summary: This book addresses important issues with evolving learning processes, innovative pedagogies, and technology-based educational applications in the digital age. Covers just-in-time learning, constructivism, student-centered learning and other new approaches.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
L1-991 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=884277 Available EBC884277

Towards Learning and Instruction in Web 3.0 -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction: Is Web 3.0 Changing Learning and Instruction? -- Introduction -- Web Generations -- Implications for Learning and Instruction -- Future Perspectives -- References -- Contents -- Contributors -- Part I: Student-Centered Learning -- Chapter 1: Facilitating Learning Through Dynamic Student Modelling of Learning Styles -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Architecture for Dynamic Student Modelling -- 2.1 Static Student Modelling Module -- 2.2 Notification Mechanism -- 2.3 Dynamic Student Modelling Module -- 2.4 Learning Style Calculation Module -- 2.5 Data Extraction Module -- 2.6 Dynamic Analysis Module -- 2.7 Student Model -- 3 Application of the Architecture in a Learning System -- 3.1 Course Structure and Available Behaviour Patterns -- 3.2 Providing Adaptive Feedback Based on Learning Styles -- 4 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 2: SQAR: An Annotation-Based Study Process to Enhance the Learner's Personal Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The Annotation Practice -- 3 Learner's Personnel Annotation -- 4 Web Annotation Tools -- 5 SQAR Process: An Annotation Based Pedagogical Process -- 5.1 Learner's Personal Annotation Formalism -- 5.2 Architecture of SQAR Process -- 5.3 Modeling of SQAR Process -- 6 Webannot a Prototype of PAML -- 7 Experimentation -- 7.1 Participants, Materials and Method -- 8 Results -- 9 Discussion -- 10 Related Work -- 11 Conclusion and Future Work -- References -- Chapter 3: Online Formative Assessment in a Medical PBL-Curriculum -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Method -- 3 Results -- 3.1 Current FAs -- 3.2 Future Online FA: Students' and Lecturers' Expectations -- 4 Discussion -- 5 Outlook -- 5.1 Requirements for Online FAs -- 5.2 Creating a Didactic Metadata Layer -- 6 Conclusion -- References.

Chapter 4: The Effect of Project Based Web 2.0-Learning on Students' Outcomes -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Project-Based Learning and Informal Learning -- 3 Community-Based Project Management Learning Model -- 4 Web-Based Learning System: PHD-LAB as a Social Community Project Management System -- 5 Learning Content and Activities via PHD-LAB -- 6 Aim of this Study and Hypothesis -- 6.1 Hypothesis 1: Learners' Performance Between Groups -- 6.2 Hypothesis 2: Learners' Attitude Between Groups -- 7 Method -- 7.1 Research Design -- 7.2 Data Collection -- 7.3 Reliability of Rubrics -- 7.4 Attitude Scale -- 7.5 Reliability of Attitude Scale -- 8 Results and Discussion -- 8.1 Hypothesis 1: Learner Performance Between Groups -- 8.2 Hypothesis 2: Learners' Attitude Between Groups -- 8.2.1 Attitude Towards CBPM Learning Model -- 8.2.2 Outcomes of Learning: Writing of the Final Report -- 8.2.3 Attitude Towards Future Work of PHD-LAB System -- 9 Conclusion -- References -- Part II: Collaborative Learning -- Chapter 5: Collaborative Language Learning Game as a Device Independent Application -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Pedagogical Concept -- 2 Description of the Game -- 2.1 Description of the Game States -- 2.1.1 Wait/Idle State -- 2.1.2 Write State -- 2.1.3 Dispute State -- 2.1.4 Vote State -- 2.1.5 End of the Game and Rewarding Procedure -- 2.2 Framework of the Game -- 3 Analysis of the Test Result -- 4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Collaborative Learning Tools in Higher Education and Life-Long Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Low-Cost Architecture -- 3 CSCL Prototype for Improving the Educational Act -- 4 Fixing Problems in CSCL Environments -- 4.1 Issues Regarding the Academic Staff -- 4.2 Responsibilities of Learning -- 4.3 Educational Content -- 4.4 Interaction -- 5 Deployment and Customization -- 6 Conclusions -- References.

Part III: Technology, Learning and Expertise -- Chapter 7: Technologies and the Assessment of Higher Order Outcomes -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Method -- 3 Results -- 3.1 Respondents' Curriculum Design -- 3.2 Teaching Activities -- 3.3 Assessment Tasks -- 4 Analysis -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 8: Visual Algorithm Simulation Exercises with Authentic Data Sets -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 2.1 Semantic Web and Web Mashups -- 2.2 Learning Graph Algorithms -- 3 Visual Algorithm Simulation Exercises with Authentic Data -- 3.1 Visual Algorithm Simulation -- 3.2 Location Data Algorithm Simulation Exercises -- 3.3 Technology -- 3.4 Teacher's Point of View -- 4 First Experiences with Students -- 4.1 Feedback Questionnaire -- 5 Conclusions -- 5.1 Future Directions -- Appendix A Data-sets used by students -- References -- Chapter 9: E-Mentoring in Vocational Teacher Education -- 1 Introduction -- 2 E-Mentoring and Teacher Education -- 2.1 The Motivate Project -- 2.2 The ASSOCiate Online Project -- 2.3 The Synchronous Coaching Project -- 3 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 10: The IPTEACES E-Learning Framework: Success Indicators, the Impact on Student Social Demographic Characteristics and the Assessment of Effectiveness -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Overview of IPTEACES Framework -- 3 Overview of Student's Demographic Characteristics and Success Indicators -- 3.1 Brief Characterization of Student's Demographic Indicators -- 3.2 Brief Characterization of Success Indicators: Approvals, Failures, Drop-outs and Evaluation of Satisfaction -- 4 Analysis of the Final Scores Through the Use of Regression Trees -- 4.1 Insurance Industry -- 4.2 Banking Industry -- 5 Measuring the Effectiveness of EPTEACES E-Learning Framework: The Case Study of Insurance Intermediaries Certification Course.

5.1 "Value-Satisfaction Grid" and "Learners' Value Index of Satisfaction" (LeVIS index) -- 6 Assessing the Effectiveness of IPTEACES E-learning Framework (N=1317) -- 6.1 Overall LeVIS index: The Effectiveness of EPTEALAS e-Learning Framework -- 7 Overall Value-Satisfaction Grid of the 41 E-Learning System Characteristics' (All Dimensions) -- 8 Conclusions -- Appendix I -- References -- Part IV: Toward Web 3.0 in Education -- Chapter 11: Key-Roles in VLEs: A Metric Based on Social Network Analysis -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Cross and Prusak's Key-Roles in VLEs -- 2.1 Central Connectors (CCs) -- 2.2 Boundary Spanners (BSs) -- 2.3 Information Brokers (IBs) -- 2.4 Peripheral Specialists (PSs) -- 3 Comparing Two Different Representation Methods of Knowledge Flows in VLEs -- 4 A Metric for Key-Roles Identification in VLEs -- 5 Case Study -- 5.1 Data -- 5.2 Results -- 5.3 Educational Hints for the Teaching Strategy -- 6 Conclusions and Future Developments -- References -- Chapter 12: First on the List: Search Engine Optimization Contests as Authentic Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Search Engines and Search Engine Optimization -- 3 SEO Contests as an Authentic Learning -- 4 Assessment of SEO Contest as Authentic Learning -- 5 Lessons Learned -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13: Teachers' Training in Exploiting 3D Virtual Worlds for Teaching and Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 3D Virtual Worlds Key Concepts for Teaching and Learning -- 3 Proposed Module for Teachers' CPD -- 3.1 Competence Description (Novice Level) of Teachers Capable of Teaching in 3D Virtual Worlds -- 3.2 Educational Objectives Related to the Proposed Competence Description -- 3.3 Instructional Strategy of the proposed Module for Teachers' CPD Programmes -- 3.4 Design of the Assessment Activities -- 3.5 Overview of the Proposed Module -- 4 Conclusions -- References.

Chapter 14: Individual Differences in Different Level Mental Rotation Tasks: An Eye Movement Study -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Mental Rotation Ability (MRA) as an Individual Difference -- 1.2 Eye Movements in the Mental Rotation Process -- 1.3 Purpose of Study -- 2 Method -- 2.1 Study Group -- 2.2 Data Collection Tools -- 2.3 Data Analysis -- 3 Findings -- 3.1 Completion Time Across Different Mental Rotation Ability Groups -- 3.2 Eye Movements Across Different MRA Levels During Tangram Problem Solving -- 3.2.1 Differences Across Different MRA Levels in Easy Level Tangram Problem -- 3.2.2 Differences Across Different MRA Levels in Difficult Level Tangram Problem -- 4 Conclusion -- 5 Future Work -- References -- Part V: Exploratory Technologies -- Chapter 15: Supporting Motivation Based Educational Games Through Web 3.0 -- 1 Introduction -- 2 State of the Art -- 2.1 Motivation -- 2.1.1 Theories of Motivation -- Self-Efficacy Theory -- Self-Determination Theory -- 2.1.2 Motivation in e-Learning -- 2.2 Educational Games -- 2.3 Web 3.0 Based e-Learning and Games -- 3 Describing Motivation in Educational Games Through Web 3.0 -- 3.1 Assessment of Motivation in Educational Games -- 3.2 Describing Learner Motivation Level Through Metadata -- 4 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 16: Learning from Incorrect Answers on Multiple Choice Tests -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Theoretical Framework for Testing and Assessment -- 1.2 Piaget, Vygotsky, and Gardner: Frameworks for Development and Learning -- 2 Presenting Selection Dynamics Visually -- 2.1 Mathematics: Standard Expectation (All ¬A Answers Are "Guesses") -- 2.2 Science: Standard Expectation (All ¬A Answers "Guesses") -- 3 Crossover -- 3.1 Mathematics: (All ¬A Answers Functioning) -- 3.2 Science: (All Alternatives Functioning) -- 4 Starting at the Same Point -- 4.1 Mathematics: (All Alternatives Functioning).

4.2 Science: (All Alternatives Functioning).

This book addresses important issues with evolving learning processes, innovative pedagogies, and technology-based educational applications in the digital age. Covers just-in-time learning, constructivism, student-centered learning and other new approaches.

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