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Corporate Sustainability in International Comparison : State of Practice, Opportunities and Challenges.

By: Schaltegger, Stefan.
Contributor(s): Harms, Dorli | Hörisch, Jacob | Windolph, Sarah Elena.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Eco-Efficiency in Industry and Science Ser: Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (269 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319062273.Subject(s): Sustainable development.;Sustainable development -- International cooperation.;Environmental managementGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Corporate Sustainability in International Comparison : State of Practice, Opportunities and ChallengesDDC classification: 658.408 LOC classification: GE1-350Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Foreword -- Foreword -- Preface -- Contents -- Contributors -- Abbreviations -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- Part I Approach and Overall Results -- 1 International Corporate Sustainability Barometer: Introduction and Structure -- 1.1 Corporate Sustainability Management: An Emerging Field in Business and Academia -- 1.2 Research Framework: The `Triple I' Approach -- 1.2.1 Intention -- 1.2.2 Integration -- 1.2.3 Implementation -- 1.3 Analytical Framework -- 1.4 Overview of Chapters and Contributions -- References -- 2 International Corporate Sustainability Barometer: Purpose and Approach -- 2.1 Current State of Research: Identifying the Research Gap -- 2.2 Methodology: Addressing the Research Gap -- References -- 3 Overview of the Aggregate Results of the International Corporate Sustainability Barometer -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Analysis -- 3.2.1 Intention -- 3.2.1.1 Motivation -- 3.2.1.2 Issues -- 3.2.2 Integration -- 3.2.2.1 Linking Sustainability to Core Business -- 3.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 3.2.2.3 Business Case Drivers for Sustainability -- 3.2.3 Implementation -- 3.2.3.1 Sustainability Management Tools -- 3.2.3.2 Sustainability Standards and Guidelines -- 3.3 Conclusion -- References -- Part II Country-Specific Findings -- 4 International Corporate Sustainability Barometer - Australia -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.1.1 The Australian Context -- 4.1.2 The Australian Sample -- 4.2 Analysis: Comparison of Australian Companies with the International Sample -- 4.2.1 Intention -- 4.2.1.1 Motivation -- 4.2.1.2 Issues -- 4.2.2 Integration -- 4.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 4.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 4.2.2.3 Business Case Drivers for Sustainability -- 4.2.3 Implementation -- 4.2.3.1 Stakeholder Management -- 4.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools -- 4.2.3.3 Measurement -- 4.3 Conclusion.
References -- 5 The Case of Belgium -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.1.1 The Belgian Context -- 5.1.2 The Belgian Sample -- 5.2 Analysis -- 5.2.1 Intention -- 5.2.1.1 Influence of Stakeholders -- 5.2.1.2 Issues Managed -- 5.2.1.3 Inhibiting Factors for Sustainability Management -- 5.2.2 Integration -- 5.2.2.1 Connection with Core Business -- 5.2.2.2 Involvement of Other Departments -- 5.2.3 Implementation -- 5.2.3.1 Tools for Sustainability Management -- 5.2.3.2 International Standards -- 5.3 Conclusion -- Appendix 5.1: Application of Sustainability Management Tools -- References -- 6 International Corporate Sustainability Barometer 2012: Sustainability Management in France -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.1.1 The French Context -- 6.1.2 Description of the French Companies Surveyed -- 6.2 Comparison of the French Resultsto the International Average -- 6.2.1 Intention -- 6.2.1.1 Impact of External Stakeholders on the Integration of Sustainability -- 6.2.1.2 Management of Sustainability Issues -- 6.2.1.3 Discussion and Implications of the Intention of French Companies to Manage Sustainability -- 6.2.2 Integration -- 6.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 6.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 6.2.2.3 Drivers for Sustainability -- 6.2.2.4 Discussion and Implications of the Integration of Sustainability by French Companies -- 6.2.3 Implementation -- 6.2.3.1 Stakeholder Management -- 6.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools -- 6.2.3.3 Measurement -- References -- 7 Corporate Sustainability Management in Large German Companies -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.1.1 The German Context -- 7.1.2 The German Sample -- 7.2 Analysis: The German Results -- 7.2.1 Intention -- 7.2.2 Integration -- 7.2.3 Implementation -- 7.3 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- 8 Sustainability Management in Hungary -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.1.1 The Hungarian Context.
8.1.2 The Hungarian Sample -- 8.2 Analysis: Comparison to the International Average -- 8.2.1 Intention -- 8.2.1.1 Motivation -- 8.2.1.2 Issues -- 8.2.2 Integration -- 8.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 8.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 8.2.2.3 Drivers for Sustainability -- 8.2.3 Implementation -- 8.2.3.1 Stakeholder Management -- 8.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools and Standards -- 8.2.3.3 Measurement -- 8.3 Conclusion and Outlook -- References -- 9 Corporate Sustainability Barometer in Japan -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.1.1 Context of Sustainability in Japan -- 9.1.2 The Japanese Sample -- 9.2 Analysis -- 9.2.1 Intention -- 9.2.1.1 Motivation -- 9.2.1.2 Issues -- 9.2.2 Integration -- 9.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 9.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 9.2.2.3 Business Case Drivers for Sustainability -- 9.2.3 Implementation -- 9.2.3.1 Sustainability Management Tools -- 9.2.3.2 Measurement -- 9.3 Conclusion -- References -- 10 The Current Status of Korean Corporate Sustainability Management -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.1.1 The Korean Context -- 10.1.2 The Korean Sample -- 10.2 Analysis -- 10.2.1 Intention -- 10.2.1.1 Motivation (External) -- 10.2.1.2 Barriers (Internal and External) -- 10.2.1.3 Issues -- 10.2.2 Integration -- 10.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 10.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 10.2.3 Implementation -- 10.2.3.1 Sustainability Management Tools (Knowledge) -- 10.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools (Application) -- 10.3 Conclusion -- References -- 11 Exploring Sustainability in Spanish Companies -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.1.1 The Spanish Context -- 11.1.2 The Spanish Sample -- 11.2 Analysis: Sustainability Management in Spain -- 11.2.1 Intention -- 11.2.1.1 Motivation -- 11.2.1.2 Issues -- 11.2.2 Integrating Sustainability -- 11.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business.
11.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 11.2.3 Implementing Sustainability with Sustainability Management Tools -- 11.3 Summary and Conclusions -- References -- 12 State of the Art and Progress of Corporate Sustainability in Switzerland -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.1.1 The Swiss Context -- 12.1.2 The Swiss Sample -- 12.2 Analysis: Switzerland in International Comparison -- 12.2.1 Intention -- 12.2.1.1 Motivation -- 12.2.1.2 Issues -- 12.2.2 Integration -- 12.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 12.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 12.2.2.3 Drivers for Sustainability -- 12.2.3 Implementation -- 12.2.3.1 Stakeholder Management -- 12.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools -- 12.2.3.3 Measurement -- 12.3 Conclusion -- References -- 13 Managing Responsible and Sustainable Business in the UK -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.1.1 The UK Context -- 13.1.2 The UK Sample -- 13.2 Findings -- 13.2.1 Intention -- 13.2.1.1 Influence of Organisational Units -- 13.2.1.2 Influence of External Stakeholders -- 13.2.1.3 Drivers for and Barriers to Sustainability -- 13.2.1.4 Issues -- 13.2.2 Integration -- 13.2.2.1 Integration into Core Business -- 13.2.2.2 Business Cases for Sustainability -- 13.2.2.3 Addressing Environmental and Social Issues Raised by Stakeholders -- 13.2.3 Implementation -- 13.2.3.1 Managing Stakeholder Relations -- 13.2.3.2 Methods of Sustainability Management -- 13.2.3.3 Standards and Guidelines -- 13.2.3.4 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 13.3 Conclusion -- References -- 14 The Case of Corporate Sustainability in the United States of America -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.1.1 The US American Context -- 14.1.1.1 Voluntary Initiatives -- 14.1.1.2 Workplace Health and Safety in the US -- 14.1.1.3 Diversity and Assimilation in the US -- 14.1.2 The US Sample -- 14.2 Analysis -- 14.2.1 Intention -- 14.2.2 Integration -- 14.2.3 Implementation.
14.3 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Part III Patterns and Conclusion -- 15 General Patterns and Conclusions -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 International Similarities or National Differences in Corporate Sustainability Management? -- 15.2.1 International Similarities in Corporate Sustainability Management -- 15.2.2 National Differences in Corporate Sustainability Management -- 15.3 Analytical Approach -- 15.4 Key Findings -- 15.4.1 The Spread Among National Averages -- 15.4.2 National Patterns in Comparison -- 15.4.3 Intensity Levels of Sustainability Management -- 15.5 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Index.
Summary: Although every country is distinguished by its history, culture and language as well as its unique economic, environmental and social conditions, it can be expected that international operating companies will exhibit common patterns since sustainability challenges do not stop at national borders.Building on original data based on results of the International Corporate Sustainability Barometer survey, this book depicts and analyzes the current state of corporate sustainability management and corporate social responsibility.Part I describe the approach and summarizes the broad results, outlining the methodology and offering an overview of results of the ICSB survey. Part II presents specific findings for each of eleven countries surveyed: Australia, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Korea, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the USA. Part III provides a comparative analysis and highlights broad patterns in the international results. Most strikingly, the book reveals surprisingly widespread similarities among the sustainability management practices of large companies in economically developed countries all over the world.All the survey results are analyzed according to the same Triple-I approach: Intention - Why do companies manage sustainability;?Integration - To what extent do companies embed sustainability in their core business and in their organization And Implementation - How is corporate sustainability operationalized Based on this structure the analysis serves not only to make comparisons and to investigate national characteristics; it also builds a foundation for examining whether there truly is a world-spanning common state of the art of corporate sustainability. Distinguished authors who were involved in the International Corporate Sustainability Barometer project offer their insights, identifying and discussing nationalSummary: and international patterns that can provide the basis for further ideas and inspiration to practitioners and researchers worldwide who are engaged in corporate sustainability.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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GE1-350 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1782912 Available EBC1782912

Intro -- Foreword -- Foreword -- Preface -- Contents -- Contributors -- Abbreviations -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- Part I Approach and Overall Results -- 1 International Corporate Sustainability Barometer: Introduction and Structure -- 1.1 Corporate Sustainability Management: An Emerging Field in Business and Academia -- 1.2 Research Framework: The `Triple I' Approach -- 1.2.1 Intention -- 1.2.2 Integration -- 1.2.3 Implementation -- 1.3 Analytical Framework -- 1.4 Overview of Chapters and Contributions -- References -- 2 International Corporate Sustainability Barometer: Purpose and Approach -- 2.1 Current State of Research: Identifying the Research Gap -- 2.2 Methodology: Addressing the Research Gap -- References -- 3 Overview of the Aggregate Results of the International Corporate Sustainability Barometer -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Analysis -- 3.2.1 Intention -- 3.2.1.1 Motivation -- 3.2.1.2 Issues -- 3.2.2 Integration -- 3.2.2.1 Linking Sustainability to Core Business -- 3.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 3.2.2.3 Business Case Drivers for Sustainability -- 3.2.3 Implementation -- 3.2.3.1 Sustainability Management Tools -- 3.2.3.2 Sustainability Standards and Guidelines -- 3.3 Conclusion -- References -- Part II Country-Specific Findings -- 4 International Corporate Sustainability Barometer - Australia -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.1.1 The Australian Context -- 4.1.2 The Australian Sample -- 4.2 Analysis: Comparison of Australian Companies with the International Sample -- 4.2.1 Intention -- 4.2.1.1 Motivation -- 4.2.1.2 Issues -- 4.2.2 Integration -- 4.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 4.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 4.2.2.3 Business Case Drivers for Sustainability -- 4.2.3 Implementation -- 4.2.3.1 Stakeholder Management -- 4.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools -- 4.2.3.3 Measurement -- 4.3 Conclusion.

References -- 5 The Case of Belgium -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.1.1 The Belgian Context -- 5.1.2 The Belgian Sample -- 5.2 Analysis -- 5.2.1 Intention -- 5.2.1.1 Influence of Stakeholders -- 5.2.1.2 Issues Managed -- 5.2.1.3 Inhibiting Factors for Sustainability Management -- 5.2.2 Integration -- 5.2.2.1 Connection with Core Business -- 5.2.2.2 Involvement of Other Departments -- 5.2.3 Implementation -- 5.2.3.1 Tools for Sustainability Management -- 5.2.3.2 International Standards -- 5.3 Conclusion -- Appendix 5.1: Application of Sustainability Management Tools -- References -- 6 International Corporate Sustainability Barometer 2012: Sustainability Management in France -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.1.1 The French Context -- 6.1.2 Description of the French Companies Surveyed -- 6.2 Comparison of the French Resultsto the International Average -- 6.2.1 Intention -- 6.2.1.1 Impact of External Stakeholders on the Integration of Sustainability -- 6.2.1.2 Management of Sustainability Issues -- 6.2.1.3 Discussion and Implications of the Intention of French Companies to Manage Sustainability -- 6.2.2 Integration -- 6.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 6.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 6.2.2.3 Drivers for Sustainability -- 6.2.2.4 Discussion and Implications of the Integration of Sustainability by French Companies -- 6.2.3 Implementation -- 6.2.3.1 Stakeholder Management -- 6.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools -- 6.2.3.3 Measurement -- References -- 7 Corporate Sustainability Management in Large German Companies -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.1.1 The German Context -- 7.1.2 The German Sample -- 7.2 Analysis: The German Results -- 7.2.1 Intention -- 7.2.2 Integration -- 7.2.3 Implementation -- 7.3 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- 8 Sustainability Management in Hungary -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.1.1 The Hungarian Context.

8.1.2 The Hungarian Sample -- 8.2 Analysis: Comparison to the International Average -- 8.2.1 Intention -- 8.2.1.1 Motivation -- 8.2.1.2 Issues -- 8.2.2 Integration -- 8.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 8.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 8.2.2.3 Drivers for Sustainability -- 8.2.3 Implementation -- 8.2.3.1 Stakeholder Management -- 8.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools and Standards -- 8.2.3.3 Measurement -- 8.3 Conclusion and Outlook -- References -- 9 Corporate Sustainability Barometer in Japan -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.1.1 Context of Sustainability in Japan -- 9.1.2 The Japanese Sample -- 9.2 Analysis -- 9.2.1 Intention -- 9.2.1.1 Motivation -- 9.2.1.2 Issues -- 9.2.2 Integration -- 9.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 9.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 9.2.2.3 Business Case Drivers for Sustainability -- 9.2.3 Implementation -- 9.2.3.1 Sustainability Management Tools -- 9.2.3.2 Measurement -- 9.3 Conclusion -- References -- 10 The Current Status of Korean Corporate Sustainability Management -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.1.1 The Korean Context -- 10.1.2 The Korean Sample -- 10.2 Analysis -- 10.2.1 Intention -- 10.2.1.1 Motivation (External) -- 10.2.1.2 Barriers (Internal and External) -- 10.2.1.3 Issues -- 10.2.2 Integration -- 10.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 10.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 10.2.3 Implementation -- 10.2.3.1 Sustainability Management Tools (Knowledge) -- 10.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools (Application) -- 10.3 Conclusion -- References -- 11 Exploring Sustainability in Spanish Companies -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.1.1 The Spanish Context -- 11.1.2 The Spanish Sample -- 11.2 Analysis: Sustainability Management in Spain -- 11.2.1 Intention -- 11.2.1.1 Motivation -- 11.2.1.2 Issues -- 11.2.2 Integrating Sustainability -- 11.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business.

11.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 11.2.3 Implementing Sustainability with Sustainability Management Tools -- 11.3 Summary and Conclusions -- References -- 12 State of the Art and Progress of Corporate Sustainability in Switzerland -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.1.1 The Swiss Context -- 12.1.2 The Swiss Sample -- 12.2 Analysis: Switzerland in International Comparison -- 12.2.1 Intention -- 12.2.1.1 Motivation -- 12.2.1.2 Issues -- 12.2.2 Integration -- 12.2.2.1 Connection to Core Business -- 12.2.2.2 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 12.2.2.3 Drivers for Sustainability -- 12.2.3 Implementation -- 12.2.3.1 Stakeholder Management -- 12.2.3.2 Sustainability Management Tools -- 12.2.3.3 Measurement -- 12.3 Conclusion -- References -- 13 Managing Responsible and Sustainable Business in the UK -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.1.1 The UK Context -- 13.1.2 The UK Sample -- 13.2 Findings -- 13.2.1 Intention -- 13.2.1.1 Influence of Organisational Units -- 13.2.1.2 Influence of External Stakeholders -- 13.2.1.3 Drivers for and Barriers to Sustainability -- 13.2.1.4 Issues -- 13.2.2 Integration -- 13.2.2.1 Integration into Core Business -- 13.2.2.2 Business Cases for Sustainability -- 13.2.2.3 Addressing Environmental and Social Issues Raised by Stakeholders -- 13.2.3 Implementation -- 13.2.3.1 Managing Stakeholder Relations -- 13.2.3.2 Methods of Sustainability Management -- 13.2.3.3 Standards and Guidelines -- 13.2.3.4 Involvement of Organisational Units -- 13.3 Conclusion -- References -- 14 The Case of Corporate Sustainability in the United States of America -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.1.1 The US American Context -- 14.1.1.1 Voluntary Initiatives -- 14.1.1.2 Workplace Health and Safety in the US -- 14.1.1.3 Diversity and Assimilation in the US -- 14.1.2 The US Sample -- 14.2 Analysis -- 14.2.1 Intention -- 14.2.2 Integration -- 14.2.3 Implementation.

14.3 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Part III Patterns and Conclusion -- 15 General Patterns and Conclusions -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 International Similarities or National Differences in Corporate Sustainability Management? -- 15.2.1 International Similarities in Corporate Sustainability Management -- 15.2.2 National Differences in Corporate Sustainability Management -- 15.3 Analytical Approach -- 15.4 Key Findings -- 15.4.1 The Spread Among National Averages -- 15.4.2 National Patterns in Comparison -- 15.4.3 Intensity Levels of Sustainability Management -- 15.5 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Index.

Although every country is distinguished by its history, culture and language as well as its unique economic, environmental and social conditions, it can be expected that international operating companies will exhibit common patterns since sustainability challenges do not stop at national borders.Building on original data based on results of the International Corporate Sustainability Barometer survey, this book depicts and analyzes the current state of corporate sustainability management and corporate social responsibility.Part I describe the approach and summarizes the broad results, outlining the methodology and offering an overview of results of the ICSB survey. Part II presents specific findings for each of eleven countries surveyed: Australia, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Korea, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the USA. Part III provides a comparative analysis and highlights broad patterns in the international results. Most strikingly, the book reveals surprisingly widespread similarities among the sustainability management practices of large companies in economically developed countries all over the world.All the survey results are analyzed according to the same Triple-I approach: Intention - Why do companies manage sustainability;?Integration - To what extent do companies embed sustainability in their core business and in their organization And Implementation - How is corporate sustainability operationalized Based on this structure the analysis serves not only to make comparisons and to investigate national characteristics; it also builds a foundation for examining whether there truly is a world-spanning common state of the art of corporate sustainability. Distinguished authors who were involved in the International Corporate Sustainability Barometer project offer their insights, identifying and discussing national

and international patterns that can provide the basis for further ideas and inspiration to practitioners and researchers worldwide who are engaged in corporate sustainability.

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