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Liberty Power : Antislavery Third Parties and the Transformation of American Politics.

By: Brooks, Corey M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.American Beginnings, 1500-1900: Publisher: Chicago, IL : University of Chicago Press, 2016Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (311 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780226307312.Subject(s): Liberty Party (U.S.: 1840-1848)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Liberty Power : Antislavery Third Parties and the Transformation of American PoliticsDDC classification: 973.6 LOC classification: E449Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Introduction -- Chapter One. Political Abolition and the Slave Power Argument, 1835-1840 -- Interlude One. "Bowing Down to the Slave Power": Northern Whigs, Slavery, and the Speakership, 1839 -- Chapter Two. Agitating the Congress: Abolitionist Lobbying and Antislavery Alliances, 1836-1844 -- Interlude Two. "A Temporary 'Third Party'": Antislavery Whig Dissidents in the 1841 Speakership Contest -- Chapter Three. Building Third-Party Electoral Power, 1841-1846 -- Chapter Four. Antislavery Upheaval in the Capitol: The Wilmot Proviso Debates and the Widening Sectional Divide, 1846-1848 -- Interlude Three. "Let the Lines Be Drawn": Conscience Whig Insurgency and the 1847 Speakership Election -- Chapter Five. Liberty Men and the Creation of an Anti-Slave Power Coalition, 1846-1849 -- Interlude Four. "Glorious Confusion in the Ranks": The Free Soil Balance of Power, 1849 -- Chapter Six. Free Soil Politics and the Twilight of the Second Party System, 1849-1853 -- Chapter Seven. The Nebraska Outrage and the Advent of the Republican Party, 1853-1855 -- Interlude Five. "A New Era in Our History": The Longest Speakership Contest in American History and the First Republican National Victory, 1855-1856 -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E449 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4386756 Available EBC4386756

Contents -- Introduction -- Chapter One. Political Abolition and the Slave Power Argument, 1835-1840 -- Interlude One. "Bowing Down to the Slave Power": Northern Whigs, Slavery, and the Speakership, 1839 -- Chapter Two. Agitating the Congress: Abolitionist Lobbying and Antislavery Alliances, 1836-1844 -- Interlude Two. "A Temporary 'Third Party'": Antislavery Whig Dissidents in the 1841 Speakership Contest -- Chapter Three. Building Third-Party Electoral Power, 1841-1846 -- Chapter Four. Antislavery Upheaval in the Capitol: The Wilmot Proviso Debates and the Widening Sectional Divide, 1846-1848 -- Interlude Three. "Let the Lines Be Drawn": Conscience Whig Insurgency and the 1847 Speakership Election -- Chapter Five. Liberty Men and the Creation of an Anti-Slave Power Coalition, 1846-1849 -- Interlude Four. "Glorious Confusion in the Ranks": The Free Soil Balance of Power, 1849 -- Chapter Six. Free Soil Politics and the Twilight of the Second Party System, 1849-1853 -- Chapter Seven. The Nebraska Outrage and the Advent of the Republican Party, 1853-1855 -- Interlude Five. "A New Era in Our History": The Longest Speakership Contest in American History and the First Republican National Victory, 1855-1856 -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- Index.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Brooks (York College) has written an excellent study that forces readers to consider the historiographic consensus that surrounds the familiar topic of political abolitionism in the antebellum US. He takes issue with the Garrisonian argument that political abolitionism was morally inferior and ineffective, an argument that has also colored much of the scholarship on abolitionism. Rather, he argues, political abolitionism--in particular, the Liberty Party--played a pivotal role in the ultimate success of the movement: emancipation during the Civil War. By effectively using the partisan tools of the Second Party System, political abolitionists made themselves a valuable part of important coalitions, which in turn rendered them more effective agents of antislavery. They provoked the Southern Slave Power politicians into overreacting to perceived threats to slavery, which had decisive effects on Northern public opinion. Brooks ably demonstrates that the Free Soil and Republican parties did not arise from a vacuum but emerged from the effective partisan work of the "liberty power" in US political culture. This well-researched, compelling study deserves a wide readership. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. --Kevin M. Gannon, Grand View University

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