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Tragedy and Trauma in the Plays of Christopher Marlowe.

By: Martin, Mathew R.
Contributor(s): Ostovich, Helen.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama Ser: Publisher: London : Routledge, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (188 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317008378.Subject(s): Psychic trauma in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Tragedy and Trauma in the Plays of Christopher MarloweDDC classification: 822/.3 LOC classification: PR2677.P8.M378 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 Trauma, Faith, and Epic History in Dido, Queen of Carthage -- Chapter 2 Trauma and Tragedy in Tamburlaine the Great Part One -- Chapter 3 Tamburlaine the Great Part Two and the Refusal of Tragedy -- Chapter 4 Tragedy and Psychopathology in The Jew of Malta -- Chapter 5 Pain, History, and Theater in Edward II -- Chapter 6 The Traumatic Realism of The Massacre at Paris -- Chapter 7 Doctor Faustus and the Fundamental Fantasy -- References -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
2014049927 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4442548 Available EBC4442548

Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 Trauma, Faith, and Epic History in Dido, Queen of Carthage -- Chapter 2 Trauma and Tragedy in Tamburlaine the Great Part One -- Chapter 3 Tamburlaine the Great Part Two and the Refusal of Tragedy -- Chapter 4 Tragedy and Psychopathology in The Jew of Malta -- Chapter 5 Pain, History, and Theater in Edward II -- Chapter 6 The Traumatic Realism of The Massacre at Paris -- Chapter 7 Doctor Faustus and the Fundamental Fantasy -- References -- Index.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Beginning with the observation that Marlowe's plays are trauma narratives--i.e., "narratives of physical and psychological wounding and its consequences," as he writes in the introduction--Martin (Brock Univ., Canada) utilizes Lacanian psychoanalysis and trauma theory to explicate each of the plays. He finds that Marlowe's drama embodies a "traumatic mimesis" that undermines the tragic mimesis central to early modern humanistic understandings of tragedy. Martin first theorizes this approach to the violence and trauma of Marlowe's drama, distinguishing trauma narrative from the perspectives both of de casibus tragedy and of an Aristotelian understanding of tragedy. The chapters treat individual plays and are insightful and convincing throughout, but of particular interest are Martin's interpretations of Dido, Queene of Carthage and The Massacre at Paris, the two least-studied of Marlowe's plays. For the most part, Martin's argument is accessible, and he provides discursive footnotes. Although his psychoanalytic vocabulary and lengthy sentences may pose challenges for those who are less experienced, all readers will find the book rewarding. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Bruce E. Brandt, South Dakota State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mathew R. Martin is Professor of English Language and Literature at Brock University, Canada. He is author of Between Theatre and Philosophy: Skepticism in the Major City Comedies of Ben Jonson and Thomas Middleton (2001), co-editor of Staging Pain, 1580-1800 (Ashgate, 2009), and author of articles on Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, and Ford. He has also edited Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, Edward the Second, The Jew of Malta, and Tamburlaine the Great Part One and Part Two for Broadview Editions.

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