Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment : The Next Frontier for Health Technology Assessment.

By: Sampietro-Colom, LauraContributor(s): Martin, JanetMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2017Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (384 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319392059Subject(s): Medical technology--EvaluationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment : The Next Frontier for Health Technology AssessmentDDC classification: 362.1 LOC classification: RA410.5.H67 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Part I: Introduction -- Chapter 1: Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment: The Next Frontier -- 1.1 What Is Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment (HB-HTA)? -- 1.2 Why Hospital-Based HTA Is Important -- 1.3 Worldwide Approaches to HB-HTA Organization and Performance -- 1.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part II: HB-HTA Case Studies from Around the Globe -- Chapter 2: Activity-Based HTA: Hospital-Based HTA Performed by Clinicians with Support and Quality Control, the Sahlgrenska University Hospital HTA-Centrum Experience (Sweden) -- 2.1 History -- 2.2 Activity-Based HTA: Needs-Led HTA Performed by Clinicians with Support and Quality Control -- 2.2.1 Questions for Activity-Based HTA -- 2.2.2 The Standardised HTA Questionnaire -- 2.2.3 The Role of the Clinicians -- 2.2.4 Workflow and Production Lead Times -- 2.3 Tools and Work Principles -- 2.3.1 Website, Online Resources and Work Tools -- 2.3.2 The Role of the HTA Experts in the Activity-Based HTA Project -- 2.4 Role of the Information Specialists -- 2.4.1 Literature Search -- 2.4.2 First Selection of Articles: A Major Task for the Librarians -- 2.4.3 Guiding the Clinicians -- 2.5 HTA-Centrum Staffing, Products and Production -- 2.5.1 Five Important HTA-Centrum Products -- 2.5.2 Reports from the HTA-Centrum and Current Status -- 2.6 Impact and Conclusions -- 2.6.1 Lessons Learned Include -- 2.6.2 Main Take-Home Messages -- 2.6.3 Clinicians' Views on the Activity-Based HTA Process -- 2.7 Visions of the Future -- References -- Chapter 3: HTA Activities in Finnish Hospitals -- 3.1 Early Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Activities in Finland -- 3.2 The Managed Uptake of Medical Methods Program (MUMM) -- 3.3 HTA in Finnish Hospitals -- 3.4 Developments Arising from the New Law.
3.5 The Current Mode of Operation in the Helsinki University Hospital Regarding New Technologies -- 3.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 4: Hospital-Based HTA in Denmark -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Organisational Characteristics -- 4.2.1 Characteristics of the HTA Process -- 4.3 Impact of HB-HTA -- 4.4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5: Hospital-Based HTA at Radboud University Medical Centre in the Netherlands: Welcome to Reality -- 5.1 The Role of University-Based Hospitals in HTA in the Netherlands -- 5.2 Our View of Hospital-Based HTA -- 5.3 The HTA Unit at Radboud University Medical Centre -- 5.3.1 Projects Commissioned by the Hospital Board -- 5.4 Impact on Decision-Making -- 5.5 Some Conclusions and a Vision for the Future -- References -- Chapter 6: Hospital-Based HTA in Three Spanish Hospitals -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Organizational Characteristics of HB-HTA -- 6.3 Characteristics of the Assessment Process -- 6.4 Impact of HB-HTA -- 6.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7: The "Comité d'Evaluation et de Diffusion des Innovations Technologiques" (CEDIT) in France -- 7.1 Why Perform a HB-HTA in France? -- 7.2 History and Structure -- 7.3 Mission -- 7.4 How the CEDIT Works -- 7.5 National and International Collaborations -- 7.6 Dissemination Activities -- 7.7 Lessons Learned: Future Developments -- 7.8 Agency Information -- Reference -- Chapter 8: Hospital-Based HTA in Switzerland -- 8.1 HTA Context in Switzerland -- 8.2 HB-HTA in Switzerland: Three Case Studies -- 8.3 The Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) Approach -- 8.4 Impact of the HB-HTA Unit Within the Hospital -- 8.5 The Geneva University Hospital (HUG) Approach -- 8.6 The North Vaudois Hospital (EHNV) Approach -- 8.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: The HTA and Innovation Unit at the A. Gemelli University Hospital (Italy).
9.1 The HTA and Innovation Unit at Agostino Gemelli University Hospital Foundation -- 9.2 Staff -- 9.3 Sources of Funding -- 9.4 Process and Procedures -- 9.5 HTA and Innovation Unit Production, Recommendation, and Impact -- 9.6 Dissemination -- 9.7 Lessons Learned -- 9.8 Future Directions of HTA and Innovation Unit at A. Gemelli University Hospital Foundation -- References -- Chapter 10: Hospital-Based HTA in Turkey -- 10.1 HTA in Turkey -- 10.2 ANHTA: Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital Health Technology Assessment Unit -- 10.2.1 Annual Audit -- 10.2.2 Examples of Technology Assessments from ANHTA -- 10.2.2.1 Example 1: Rationalizing Use of Human Albumin Solution in ANH -- 10.2.2.2 Example 2: Efficient Use of Laboratory Services in ANH -- 10.2.2.3 Example 3: Assessment of Setting Up a Bone Bank in ANH -- 10.2.3 Impact of ANHTA -- 10.2.4 What Lessons ANHTA Has Learned -- 10.2.5 Vision of the Future of HB-HTA for ANH -- References -- Chapter 11: The Evidence Decision Support Program Within the Surgery Strategic Clinical Network of Alberta Health Services in Canada -- 11.1 Brief Overview of Our Health-Care System -- 11.2 A Short History of EDSP in AHS -- 11.3 Program Improvement and Adaptation -- 11.3.1 Education Modules -- 11.3.2 Development of Criteria and Decision Guides -- 11.3.3 Development of Process for Program Adaptation to Other Settings -- 11.4 Program Description -- 11.4.1 How Does It Work? -- 11.5 EDSP Impact -- 11.6 Lessons Learned -- 11.7 Vision for the Future of Hospital-Based HTA -- References -- Chapter 12: Hospital-Based HTA and Know4Go at MEDICI in London, Ontario, Canada -- 12.1 Background -- 12.2 Evolution of HB-HTA in the London Hospitals -- 12.3 Evidence-Based Prescribing Initiative (EBPI): Drug Assessment -- 12.4 High Impact Technology Evaluation Centre (HiTEC): Assessing Drugs, Devices, and Procurement.
12.5 Evidence-Based Perioperative Clinical Outcomes Research Group (EPiCOR): Assessing Medical and Surgical Procedures -- 12.6 Centre for Medical Evidence, Decision Integrity & Clinical Impact (MEDICI): Assessing Drugs, Devices, Procedures, and Programs -- 12.7 Impact of HB-HTA in London -- 12.8 Successes and Challenges -- 12.9 Future of HB-HTA -- 12.10 Appendix 12.1: Technologies, Drugs, Devices, and Programs Evaluated (Partial List of Selected Assessments, Some Are Ongoing) -- 12.11 Appendix 12.2: Know4Go Framework -- References -- Chapter 13: Technology Assessment at SickKids (TASK): A Health Technology Assessment Research Unit Devoted to Child Health in Canada -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Health Technology Assessment in Children -- 13.3 TASK Structure and Processes -- 13.4 Aims of TASK -- 13.5 Impact of TASK -- 13.6 Lessons Learned and Future Opportunities -- 13.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14: The Health Technology Assessment Unit (TAU) of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) (Canada) -- 14.1 Background -- 14.2 Structure -- 14.3 Function -- 14.4 Discussion -- References -- Chapter 15: Hospital-Based HTA at the Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (Canada) -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Composition and Mandate -- 15.3 Mode of Operation -- 15.4 Production -- 15.5 Examples -- 15.5.1 OPTIMAH -- 15.5.2 Voice Recognition -- 15.5.3 Lean Management -- 15.5.4 Cryoablation of Renal Tumors -- 15.5.5 Review of Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) Guidelines -- 15.6 Impact -- 15.7 Education -- 15.8 HTA and Industry -- 15.9 Future Directions -- References -- Chapter 16: The Health Technology Assessment Unit of the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke (Canada) -- 16.1 Description of the Unit -- 16.1.1 Team Constitution -- 16.1.2 Clients -- 16.1.3 Types of Technology Assessed -- 16.1.4 Production Process.
16.1.5 Connections with Research -- 16.1.6 Unit Funding -- 16.2 Products and Services -- 16.2.1 Full HTA Report -- 16.2.2 Short Report and Brief Review -- 16.2.3 Field Evaluation -- 16.2.4 Methodological Support -- 16.2.5 Horizon Scanning -- 16.2.6 Internships -- 16.3 Successes -- 16.3.1 Field Evaluation -- 16.3.2 Partnership in Developing HTA Methods -- 16.3.3 Impact of the Unit on Decision-Making -- 16.4 Challenges -- 16.4.1 HTA Production Challenges -- 16.4.2 Perception of the HTA Unit -- 16.4.3 Partnership with Industry -- 16.5 Future Needs/Direction -- Appendix I: HTA Unit Team at CHUS -- Appendix II: Scientific Production Process -- References -- Chapter 17: CHU de Québec-Université Laval: 10-Years' Experience in Hospital-Based HTA (Canada) -- 17.1 Overview of the Québec Health and Social Services System -- 17.2 Description of the CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- 17.3 HB-HTA Unit of CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- 17.3.1 HB-HTA Approach at the CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- 17.3.2 Summary of HTA Activities at the CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- 17.3.3 The Future of the HB-HTA Unit at CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- References -- Chapter 18: The Penn Medicine Center for Evidence-Based Practice: Supporting the Quality, Safety, and Value of Patient Care Through Evidence-Based Practice at the Systems Level (USA) -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Setting -- 18.3 Mission -- 18.4 Rapid Systematic Reviews -- 18.4.1 Impact -- 18.4.2 Extramural Reviews -- 18.5 Clinical Decision Support and Clinical Pathways -- 18.6 Teaching -- 18.7 Lessons Learned -- 18.8 Future Directions -- 18.9 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 19: Medical Technology Assessment at Kaiser Permanente: History and Description of Approach (USA) -- 19.1 US Historical Context -- 19.2 KP History and Context -- 19.3 KP Needs -- 19.4 Evolution of Needs, Scope, and Use.
19.5 Input and Use.
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Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Part I: Introduction -- Chapter 1: Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment: The Next Frontier -- 1.1 What Is Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment (HB-HTA)? -- 1.2 Why Hospital-Based HTA Is Important -- 1.3 Worldwide Approaches to HB-HTA Organization and Performance -- 1.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part II: HB-HTA Case Studies from Around the Globe -- Chapter 2: Activity-Based HTA: Hospital-Based HTA Performed by Clinicians with Support and Quality Control, the Sahlgrenska University Hospital HTA-Centrum Experience (Sweden) -- 2.1 History -- 2.2 Activity-Based HTA: Needs-Led HTA Performed by Clinicians with Support and Quality Control -- 2.2.1 Questions for Activity-Based HTA -- 2.2.2 The Standardised HTA Questionnaire -- 2.2.3 The Role of the Clinicians -- 2.2.4 Workflow and Production Lead Times -- 2.3 Tools and Work Principles -- 2.3.1 Website, Online Resources and Work Tools -- 2.3.2 The Role of the HTA Experts in the Activity-Based HTA Project -- 2.4 Role of the Information Specialists -- 2.4.1 Literature Search -- 2.4.2 First Selection of Articles: A Major Task for the Librarians -- 2.4.3 Guiding the Clinicians -- 2.5 HTA-Centrum Staffing, Products and Production -- 2.5.1 Five Important HTA-Centrum Products -- 2.5.2 Reports from the HTA-Centrum and Current Status -- 2.6 Impact and Conclusions -- 2.6.1 Lessons Learned Include -- 2.6.2 Main Take-Home Messages -- 2.6.3 Clinicians' Views on the Activity-Based HTA Process -- 2.7 Visions of the Future -- References -- Chapter 3: HTA Activities in Finnish Hospitals -- 3.1 Early Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Activities in Finland -- 3.2 The Managed Uptake of Medical Methods Program (MUMM) -- 3.3 HTA in Finnish Hospitals -- 3.4 Developments Arising from the New Law.

3.5 The Current Mode of Operation in the Helsinki University Hospital Regarding New Technologies -- 3.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 4: Hospital-Based HTA in Denmark -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Organisational Characteristics -- 4.2.1 Characteristics of the HTA Process -- 4.3 Impact of HB-HTA -- 4.4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5: Hospital-Based HTA at Radboud University Medical Centre in the Netherlands: Welcome to Reality -- 5.1 The Role of University-Based Hospitals in HTA in the Netherlands -- 5.2 Our View of Hospital-Based HTA -- 5.3 The HTA Unit at Radboud University Medical Centre -- 5.3.1 Projects Commissioned by the Hospital Board -- 5.4 Impact on Decision-Making -- 5.5 Some Conclusions and a Vision for the Future -- References -- Chapter 6: Hospital-Based HTA in Three Spanish Hospitals -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Organizational Characteristics of HB-HTA -- 6.3 Characteristics of the Assessment Process -- 6.4 Impact of HB-HTA -- 6.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7: The "Comité d'Evaluation et de Diffusion des Innovations Technologiques" (CEDIT) in France -- 7.1 Why Perform a HB-HTA in France? -- 7.2 History and Structure -- 7.3 Mission -- 7.4 How the CEDIT Works -- 7.5 National and International Collaborations -- 7.6 Dissemination Activities -- 7.7 Lessons Learned: Future Developments -- 7.8 Agency Information -- Reference -- Chapter 8: Hospital-Based HTA in Switzerland -- 8.1 HTA Context in Switzerland -- 8.2 HB-HTA in Switzerland: Three Case Studies -- 8.3 The Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) Approach -- 8.4 Impact of the HB-HTA Unit Within the Hospital -- 8.5 The Geneva University Hospital (HUG) Approach -- 8.6 The North Vaudois Hospital (EHNV) Approach -- 8.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: The HTA and Innovation Unit at the A. Gemelli University Hospital (Italy).

9.1 The HTA and Innovation Unit at Agostino Gemelli University Hospital Foundation -- 9.2 Staff -- 9.3 Sources of Funding -- 9.4 Process and Procedures -- 9.5 HTA and Innovation Unit Production, Recommendation, and Impact -- 9.6 Dissemination -- 9.7 Lessons Learned -- 9.8 Future Directions of HTA and Innovation Unit at A. Gemelli University Hospital Foundation -- References -- Chapter 10: Hospital-Based HTA in Turkey -- 10.1 HTA in Turkey -- 10.2 ANHTA: Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital Health Technology Assessment Unit -- 10.2.1 Annual Audit -- 10.2.2 Examples of Technology Assessments from ANHTA -- 10.2.2.1 Example 1: Rationalizing Use of Human Albumin Solution in ANH -- 10.2.2.2 Example 2: Efficient Use of Laboratory Services in ANH -- 10.2.2.3 Example 3: Assessment of Setting Up a Bone Bank in ANH -- 10.2.3 Impact of ANHTA -- 10.2.4 What Lessons ANHTA Has Learned -- 10.2.5 Vision of the Future of HB-HTA for ANH -- References -- Chapter 11: The Evidence Decision Support Program Within the Surgery Strategic Clinical Network of Alberta Health Services in Canada -- 11.1 Brief Overview of Our Health-Care System -- 11.2 A Short History of EDSP in AHS -- 11.3 Program Improvement and Adaptation -- 11.3.1 Education Modules -- 11.3.2 Development of Criteria and Decision Guides -- 11.3.3 Development of Process for Program Adaptation to Other Settings -- 11.4 Program Description -- 11.4.1 How Does It Work? -- 11.5 EDSP Impact -- 11.6 Lessons Learned -- 11.7 Vision for the Future of Hospital-Based HTA -- References -- Chapter 12: Hospital-Based HTA and Know4Go at MEDICI in London, Ontario, Canada -- 12.1 Background -- 12.2 Evolution of HB-HTA in the London Hospitals -- 12.3 Evidence-Based Prescribing Initiative (EBPI): Drug Assessment -- 12.4 High Impact Technology Evaluation Centre (HiTEC): Assessing Drugs, Devices, and Procurement.

12.5 Evidence-Based Perioperative Clinical Outcomes Research Group (EPiCOR): Assessing Medical and Surgical Procedures -- 12.6 Centre for Medical Evidence, Decision Integrity & Clinical Impact (MEDICI): Assessing Drugs, Devices, Procedures, and Programs -- 12.7 Impact of HB-HTA in London -- 12.8 Successes and Challenges -- 12.9 Future of HB-HTA -- 12.10 Appendix 12.1: Technologies, Drugs, Devices, and Programs Evaluated (Partial List of Selected Assessments, Some Are Ongoing) -- 12.11 Appendix 12.2: Know4Go Framework -- References -- Chapter 13: Technology Assessment at SickKids (TASK): A Health Technology Assessment Research Unit Devoted to Child Health in Canada -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Health Technology Assessment in Children -- 13.3 TASK Structure and Processes -- 13.4 Aims of TASK -- 13.5 Impact of TASK -- 13.6 Lessons Learned and Future Opportunities -- 13.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14: The Health Technology Assessment Unit (TAU) of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) (Canada) -- 14.1 Background -- 14.2 Structure -- 14.3 Function -- 14.4 Discussion -- References -- Chapter 15: Hospital-Based HTA at the Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (Canada) -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Composition and Mandate -- 15.3 Mode of Operation -- 15.4 Production -- 15.5 Examples -- 15.5.1 OPTIMAH -- 15.5.2 Voice Recognition -- 15.5.3 Lean Management -- 15.5.4 Cryoablation of Renal Tumors -- 15.5.5 Review of Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) Guidelines -- 15.6 Impact -- 15.7 Education -- 15.8 HTA and Industry -- 15.9 Future Directions -- References -- Chapter 16: The Health Technology Assessment Unit of the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke (Canada) -- 16.1 Description of the Unit -- 16.1.1 Team Constitution -- 16.1.2 Clients -- 16.1.3 Types of Technology Assessed -- 16.1.4 Production Process.

16.1.5 Connections with Research -- 16.1.6 Unit Funding -- 16.2 Products and Services -- 16.2.1 Full HTA Report -- 16.2.2 Short Report and Brief Review -- 16.2.3 Field Evaluation -- 16.2.4 Methodological Support -- 16.2.5 Horizon Scanning -- 16.2.6 Internships -- 16.3 Successes -- 16.3.1 Field Evaluation -- 16.3.2 Partnership in Developing HTA Methods -- 16.3.3 Impact of the Unit on Decision-Making -- 16.4 Challenges -- 16.4.1 HTA Production Challenges -- 16.4.2 Perception of the HTA Unit -- 16.4.3 Partnership with Industry -- 16.5 Future Needs/Direction -- Appendix I: HTA Unit Team at CHUS -- Appendix II: Scientific Production Process -- References -- Chapter 17: CHU de Québec-Université Laval: 10-Years' Experience in Hospital-Based HTA (Canada) -- 17.1 Overview of the Québec Health and Social Services System -- 17.2 Description of the CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- 17.3 HB-HTA Unit of CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- 17.3.1 HB-HTA Approach at the CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- 17.3.2 Summary of HTA Activities at the CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- 17.3.3 The Future of the HB-HTA Unit at CHU de Québec-Université Laval -- References -- Chapter 18: The Penn Medicine Center for Evidence-Based Practice: Supporting the Quality, Safety, and Value of Patient Care Through Evidence-Based Practice at the Systems Level (USA) -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Setting -- 18.3 Mission -- 18.4 Rapid Systematic Reviews -- 18.4.1 Impact -- 18.4.2 Extramural Reviews -- 18.5 Clinical Decision Support and Clinical Pathways -- 18.6 Teaching -- 18.7 Lessons Learned -- 18.8 Future Directions -- 18.9 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 19: Medical Technology Assessment at Kaiser Permanente: History and Description of Approach (USA) -- 19.1 US Historical Context -- 19.2 KP History and Context -- 19.3 KP Needs -- 19.4 Evolution of Needs, Scope, and Use.

19.5 Input and Use.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Laura is the Head of the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Unit at the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. She has over 20 years of experience in evaluative research, specifically in HTA. She also serves as chair of the HTAi Policy Forum. Previously, she has worked in the Catalan Ministry of Health and was the co-founder of the Catalan Agency per HTA. She has been the coordinator of the European Project AdHopHTA (Adopting Hospital based HTA).

Her work has focused on the development, identification, management and transfer of information to advise on the designing of strategies and policies in the areas of assessment, planning and access of medical devices, drugs, surgical procedures and other health care technologies as well as health care programs.

She has published 19 articles in national journals, 24 articles in international journals, 5 books chapters written, and 38 publications for governmental organizations related to HTA and planning. She serves as a member of the Editorial Committee of the international Journal for Health Technology Assessment.

Dr. Janet Martin is Director of the Centre for Medical Evidence, Decision Integrity & Clinical Impact (MEDICI), and Assistant Professor, Departments of Anesthesia & Perioperative Medicine and Epidemiology & Biostatistics at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University in London, Canada.

Her research focuses on applied health technology assessment, evidence-informed decision making, and knowledge translation (HTA&KT) in hospital and regional settings. Her research also extends to hospitals and healthcare systems in developing countries to improve essential emergency and surgical services.

She has published 120 papers and completed work on 2 books. She has twice been awarded the Medical Advisory Committee Award for her HTA&KT work at the London hospitals. Dr. Martin recently won the Teaching Excellence Award for her Clinical Epidemiology course at Western University.

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