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From Pathology to Politics : Public Health in America.

By: DiLorenzo, Thomas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Somerset : Taylor and Francis, 2014Copyright date: ©2000Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (169 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781412813563.Subject(s): Electronic books. -- local | Public health -- Social aspects -- United States -- History | Public health -- United States -- History | Public health laws -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: From Pathology to Politics : Public Health in AmericaDDC classification: 362 LOC classification: KF3775 -- .B3946 2000Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- 1. Introduction -- 2. History and Evolution of the American Public Health Movement -- 3. Birth of the "New Public Health" -- 4. The Radicalization of Public Health -- 5. Is the Second Amendment Hazardous to Public Health? -- 6. Can Tax-Funded Lobbying Cure Disease? -- 7. Nothing But Politics -- 8. Political "Science" -- 9. Pawns and Mascots -- 10. From Pathology to Politics -- Notes -- Index.
Summary: At times, it seems as though virtually everything we eat and drink is denounced as bad for us by some "public health expert." Americans today are living longer than they ever have before. Why the almost daily announcements of new public health threats and proclamations of impending crises? Bennett and DiLorenzo address this question and others here. They begin by examining the large public health bureaucracy, its preoccupation with expanding governmental programs, and its concern with political issues that too often have little to do with improving public health. Then they trace the evolution of the American public health movement from its founding after the Civil War to the 1950s. They describe the transformation of public health's focus from the eradication of disease to social policy as a by-product of the 1960s.
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KF3775 -- .B3946 2000 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=3410713 Available EBC3410713

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- 1. Introduction -- 2. History and Evolution of the American Public Health Movement -- 3. Birth of the "New Public Health" -- 4. The Radicalization of Public Health -- 5. Is the Second Amendment Hazardous to Public Health? -- 6. Can Tax-Funded Lobbying Cure Disease? -- 7. Nothing But Politics -- 8. Political "Science" -- 9. Pawns and Mascots -- 10. From Pathology to Politics -- Notes -- Index.

At times, it seems as though virtually everything we eat and drink is denounced as bad for us by some "public health expert." Americans today are living longer than they ever have before. Why the almost daily announcements of new public health threats and proclamations of impending crises? Bennett and DiLorenzo address this question and others here. They begin by examining the large public health bureaucracy, its preoccupation with expanding governmental programs, and its concern with political issues that too often have little to do with improving public health. Then they trace the evolution of the American public health movement from its founding after the Civil War to the 1950s. They describe the transformation of public health's focus from the eradication of disease to social policy as a by-product of the 1960s.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Bennett (George Mason Univ.) and DiLorenzo (Loyola College, Baltimore, Maryland), both economics professors, make strong statements and offer commentary that is opposed to governmental intervention or regulation of tobacco smoking, alcohol or liquor sales, gun ownership, minimum wage, air-quality standards, fast foods, day care, or health services. According to the authors, the American Public Health Association has since 1968 aggressively pursued a welfare state in order to expand taxpayer support of ineffective social programs, illegal lobbying efforts, unnecessary public education (antismoking, radon risk, gun control, underage drinking, parenting, etc.), biased research, high salaries for public health officials, social workers and executives, travel and conference expenses, etc. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Center for Science in the Public Interest, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and major health charities are severely criticized for misleading consumers with alarming information about "cancer clusters" or the hazards of secondhand smoke. Chapter notes; minimal index. Because this book does not provide a balanced discussion of the "new public health" movement, it is not recommended for academic libraries. E. R. Paterson; SUNY College at Cortland

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