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Optimal Human Relations : The Search for a Good Life.

By: Mortensen, C. David.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Somerset : Taylor and Francis, 2014Copyright date: ©2008Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (213 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781412812283.Subject(s): Electronic books. -- local | Interpersonal communication | Interpersonal relationsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Optimal Human Relations : The Search for a Good LifeDDC classification: 302.2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Optimal Conditions -- 3. Communicative Competence -- 4. Interpersonal Compatibility -- 5. Prosocial Influence -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: Optimal Human Relations explores the favorable conditions for human beings to live the best possible way of life imaginable; it both argues the case for and documents recent advances in the study of social influences on everyday life. This inspirational conception of "the good life" invites productive inquiry into the conditions responsible for the pursuit of optimal conditions, fulfilled expectations, and a rich, vital, way of life. It is through this lens that Mortensen measures the good life, pointing to these aspects of human communication as a litmus test of the relative importance of individualistic and collective orientations. Along the way, the reader discovers who and what we are in relation to the quality of the world in which we reside alongside those who journey with us.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HM1106 -- .M67 2008 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=3410774 Available EBC3410774

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Optimal Conditions -- 3. Communicative Competence -- 4. Interpersonal Compatibility -- 5. Prosocial Influence -- Bibliography -- Index.

Optimal Human Relations explores the favorable conditions for human beings to live the best possible way of life imaginable; it both argues the case for and documents recent advances in the study of social influences on everyday life. This inspirational conception of "the good life" invites productive inquiry into the conditions responsible for the pursuit of optimal conditions, fulfilled expectations, and a rich, vital, way of life. It is through this lens that Mortensen measures the good life, pointing to these aspects of human communication as a litmus test of the relative importance of individualistic and collective orientations. Along the way, the reader discovers who and what we are in relation to the quality of the world in which we reside alongside those who journey with us.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Mortensen (communication, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison) argues that individuals can gain success and happiness through the powers of the mind alone. This became popular in the late 1800s--when preachers and businessmen proclaimed all individuals could succeed if they just pulled themselves up by their own bootstraps--and continued into the early 20th century with works by Dale Carnegie and other extollers of the power of positive thinking. It continues today in the many motivational seminars that exhort individuals to follow particular steps to health, wealth, and happiness--and in books like this one. Offering optimal human relations as the road to the good life, the author claims that his plan, if followed, will set a standard by which the good life can be measured. He organizes his chapters around ten optimal conditions that cultivate physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual health and thus generate a sense of well-being. The unwritten subtext: those who do not engage in optimal human relations end up at the bottom of the social scale--poor, illiterate, unhappy--and that is their own fault. The writing is obtuse, surreal, and interspersed with anecdotes about optimal communicators living in complete harmony. This volume overlooks the real world and leaves many questions unanswered. Summing Up: Not recommended. R. Cathcart emeritus, CUNY Queens College

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