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Social Media and Local Governments : Theory and Practice.

By: Sobaci, Mehmet Zahid.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Public Administration and Information Technology Ser: Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2015Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (333 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319177229.Subject(s): Management scienceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Social Media and Local Governments : Theory and PracticeDDC classification: 352.140285 LOC classification: HB71-74Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Preface -- Contents -- Part I: Concept, Policy and Perception -- Chapter 1: Social Media and Local Governments: An Overview -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Social Media: A Conceptual Framework -- 1.3 Reasons for Using Social Media in Local Governments -- 1.4 The Local Government - Social Media Relationship: A Cyclical Process -- 1.5 The Benefits of Social Media to Local Governments -- 1.6 Risks and Barriers for Local Governments -- 1.7 Literature Review and Future Studies -- References -- Chapter 2: Designing Social Media Policy for Local Governments: Opportunities and Challenges -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Integrating Social Media to Policy-Making in Local Governments -- 2.3 The Necessity of Social Media Policy for Local Governments -- 2.4 Designing Social Media Policy for Local Governments -- 2.4.1 Setting Goals, Objectives, and Measurement Criteria -- 2.4.2 Formulating Social Media Policy -- 2.4.3 Policy Alternatives for Regulation of Social Media in Local Governments -- 2.4.3.1 Strategy Documents -- 2.4.3.2 Guidelines, Protocols, and Standards -- 2.4.3.3 Alternative Tools -- 2.4.4 Implementation of Policy -- 2.4.5 Evaluation of Policy Achievements -- 2.5 Engagement of Social Media Policy into Local Governments: Problems and Prospects -- 2.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3: Policymakers' Perceptions on the Citizen Participation and Knowledge Sharing in Public Sector Delivery -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Web 2.0 Technologies and the Co-production of Public Services -- 3.3 Policymakers' Perceptions on Web 2.0 Implementations and its Potential for Citizen Engagement, Improvement of Technological Innovation and Knowledge Sharing in Public Sector Services Delivery -- 3.3.1 Sample Selection -- 3.3.2 Methodology of Research -- 3.3.3 Analysis of Results -- 3.4 Discussions -- 3.5 Conclusions -- 3.6 Appendix -- References.
Part II: Presence and Use -- Chapter 4: Facebook Use in Western European Local Governments: An Overall View -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Government-Citizen Collaboration: The Role of Social Media and Related Challenges -- 4.3 Sample, Research Design, and Methods -- 4.4 Analysis of Results -- 4.5 Discussion -- 4.6 Conclusions -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 5: Social Media and Local Government in Canada: An Examination of Presence and Purpose -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Literature Review: Gov 2.0, Participative Governance and Social Media -- 5.3 Methodology: An Examination of Presence and Purpose -- 5.3.1 Service Delivery: Social Media as Informing -- 5.3.2 Political vs. Administrative Usage and How They Are Linked -- 5.4 Discussion and Lessons Learned: Opportunities and Challenges -- 5.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Social Media in Local Governments in Mexico: A Diffusion Innovation Trend and Lessons -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Literature Review -- 6.3 Methodology -- 6.4 Findings and Discussion -- 6.4.1 Findings -- 6.4.2 Discussion -- 6.5 Conclusions and Recommendations -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 7: Social Media Adoption and Use by Australian Capital City Local Governments -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Literature Review -- 7.2.1 E-Government Adoption in Australian Local Governments -- 7.2.2 E-Government 2.0 Adoption and International Local Governments -- 7.2.3 Social Media Adoption by Local Governments -- 7.3 Local Government in Australia -- 7.4 Methodology -- 7.4.1 Web Site Review -- 7.4.2 Twitter Sentiment Analysis -- 7.5 Results -- 7.6 Discussion -- References -- Part III: Adoption and Diffusion -- Chapter 8: Adopting Social Media in the Local Level of Government: Towards a Public Administration 2.0? -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Theoretical Framework: Social Technologies to Innovate Public Administrations.
8.3 Analytic Strategy and Methodology -- 8.4 Data and Results -- 8.4.1 Departments Responsible for the Management of Social Media -- 8.4.2 The Introduction of Policies or Guidance for the Use of Digital Social Media -- 8.4.3 Principal Social Technologies Employed -- 8.4.4 Motivations for the Use of Social Media -- 8.4.5 Perception About the Level of Development of Social Media -- 8.4.6 Inhibitors in the Use of Social Media -- 8.5 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 9: Greek Local E-Government 2.0: Drivers and Outcomes of Social Media Adoption -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Literature Review -- 9.2.1 E-Government 2.0: An Emerging Paradigm Shift -- 9.2.2 Social Media Implementation Strategies -- 9.3 Conceptual Framework -- 9.3.1 Drivers of Social Media Adoption -- 9.3.2 Citizens' Participation Through Social Media: Myth or Measurable Reality -- 9.4 Methodology -- 9.5 Results -- 9.6 Discussion -- 9.7 Conclusions -- 9.8 Limitations and Future Research Suggestions -- References -- Chapter 10: The Diffusion of Microblogging in the Public Sector: Evidence from Chinese Provinces -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The Use of Microblogging in Chinese Public Sectors -- 10.3 Theory and Hypotheses -- 10.3.1 Institutional Characteristics -- 10.3.2 Jurisdictional Attributes -- 10.3.3 Leaders' Championship and Advocacy -- 10.3.4 Inter-Jurisdictional Diffusion Effects -- 10.4 Methods -- 10.4.1 Sample and Data Sources -- 10.4.2 Dependent Variables -- 10.4.3 Independent Variables -- 10.4.4 Analytic Methods -- 10.5 Results -- 10.6 Discussions -- 10.7 Conclusion -- References -- Part IV: Communication and Citizen Engagement -- Chapter 11: Digital Civic Participation in Australian Local Governments: Everyday Practices and Opportunities for Engagement -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Social Media and Civic Engagement in Digital Local Government.
11.3 The Australian Context -- 11.4 Methodology -- 11.5 Digital Civic Engagement with Australian Local Governments -- 11.5.1 Information Dissemination and Service Delivery -- 11.5.2 Civic Participation -- 11.6 Challenges for Local Digital Engagement -- 11.6.1 Barriers to Rural Digital Practices -- 11.6.2 Limitations of Urban Digital Practices -- 11.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 12: The Use of Facebook to Promote Engagement with Local Governments in Spain -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Theoretical Framework and Literature Review -- 12.2.1 Local Population Size -- 12.2.2 Economic Capacity -- 12.2.3 Political Ideology -- 12.2.4 Political Competition -- 12.2.5 Internet Use Among the Population -- 12.2.6 Municipal Debt -- 12.3 Methodology -- 12.3.1 Descriptive Analysis -- 12.3.2 Explanatory Analysis -- 12.3.3 Sample -- 12.4 Results -- 12.5 Discussion -- 12.6 Conclusions -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 13: Social Media and the City: Analyzing Conversations in Municipal Facebook Pages -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Research Questions and Hypotheses -- 13.3 Methodology -- 13.4 Findings -- 13.4.1 Facebook Presence -- 13.4.2 Engagement Measures of Municipal Facebook Pages -- 13.4.3 Post Origin and Engagement -- 13.4.4 Comparing Activity and Engagement in Election and Non-election Periods -- 13.4.5 Distribution of Fans by Municipality and Period -- 13.5 Discussion -- 13.6 Summary and Conclusions -- References -- Part V: Local Campaigns and Elections -- Chapter 14: The Net Effect of Social Media on Election Results: The Case of Twitter in 2014 Turkish Local Elections -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Background -- 14.2.1 Social Media and Election Campaigns -- 14.2.2 Literature Review: Identifying the Gap -- 14.3 An Empirical Study: Net Effect? -- 14.3.1 Method -- 14.3.2 Data and Model -- 14.3.3 Findings -- 14.4 Discussion -- Conclusion -- References.
Chapter 15: Social Media Indicator and Local Elections in the Netherlands: Towards a Framework for Evaluating the Influence of Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Method and Introducing the Theoretical Framework -- 15.3 Results of the Pilot Study During Local Municipal Elections in the Netherlands -- 15.4 Discussion -- 15.5 Conclusion -- References -- Part VI: Emerging Issues -- Chapter 16: Branding Cities in the Age of Social Media: A Comparative Assessment of Local Government Performance -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Branding Places in a Digital Environment -- 16.2.1 Moving from Spaces to Places -- 16.2.2 Place Branding and Social Media -- 16.3 Methodology -- 16.4 Findings -- 16.5 Discussion -- 16.6 Conclusions and Recommendations -- References -- Chapter 17: Social Media Use in Crisis Communication Management: An Opportunity for Local Communities? -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Crisis Management: From Traditional to Social Media -- 17.3 Social Media Offer New Tools for Crisis Communication Management -- 17.4 The Use of Social Media in Local Communities Facing Crisis Scenarios -- 17.5 Twitter as a Tool for Crisis Management in the Local Context -- 17.6 Some Lessons from the Madrid Arena Crisis as a Case Study -- 17.7 Discussion -- 17.8 Conclusions -- References.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HB71-74 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=3567691 Available EBC3567691

Intro -- Preface -- Contents -- Part I: Concept, Policy and Perception -- Chapter 1: Social Media and Local Governments: An Overview -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Social Media: A Conceptual Framework -- 1.3 Reasons for Using Social Media in Local Governments -- 1.4 The Local Government - Social Media Relationship: A Cyclical Process -- 1.5 The Benefits of Social Media to Local Governments -- 1.6 Risks and Barriers for Local Governments -- 1.7 Literature Review and Future Studies -- References -- Chapter 2: Designing Social Media Policy for Local Governments: Opportunities and Challenges -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Integrating Social Media to Policy-Making in Local Governments -- 2.3 The Necessity of Social Media Policy for Local Governments -- 2.4 Designing Social Media Policy for Local Governments -- 2.4.1 Setting Goals, Objectives, and Measurement Criteria -- 2.4.2 Formulating Social Media Policy -- 2.4.3 Policy Alternatives for Regulation of Social Media in Local Governments -- 2.4.3.1 Strategy Documents -- 2.4.3.2 Guidelines, Protocols, and Standards -- 2.4.3.3 Alternative Tools -- 2.4.4 Implementation of Policy -- 2.4.5 Evaluation of Policy Achievements -- 2.5 Engagement of Social Media Policy into Local Governments: Problems and Prospects -- 2.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3: Policymakers' Perceptions on the Citizen Participation and Knowledge Sharing in Public Sector Delivery -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Web 2.0 Technologies and the Co-production of Public Services -- 3.3 Policymakers' Perceptions on Web 2.0 Implementations and its Potential for Citizen Engagement, Improvement of Technological Innovation and Knowledge Sharing in Public Sector Services Delivery -- 3.3.1 Sample Selection -- 3.3.2 Methodology of Research -- 3.3.3 Analysis of Results -- 3.4 Discussions -- 3.5 Conclusions -- 3.6 Appendix -- References.

Part II: Presence and Use -- Chapter 4: Facebook Use in Western European Local Governments: An Overall View -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Government-Citizen Collaboration: The Role of Social Media and Related Challenges -- 4.3 Sample, Research Design, and Methods -- 4.4 Analysis of Results -- 4.5 Discussion -- 4.6 Conclusions -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 5: Social Media and Local Government in Canada: An Examination of Presence and Purpose -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Literature Review: Gov 2.0, Participative Governance and Social Media -- 5.3 Methodology: An Examination of Presence and Purpose -- 5.3.1 Service Delivery: Social Media as Informing -- 5.3.2 Political vs. Administrative Usage and How They Are Linked -- 5.4 Discussion and Lessons Learned: Opportunities and Challenges -- 5.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Social Media in Local Governments in Mexico: A Diffusion Innovation Trend and Lessons -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Literature Review -- 6.3 Methodology -- 6.4 Findings and Discussion -- 6.4.1 Findings -- 6.4.2 Discussion -- 6.5 Conclusions and Recommendations -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 7: Social Media Adoption and Use by Australian Capital City Local Governments -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Literature Review -- 7.2.1 E-Government Adoption in Australian Local Governments -- 7.2.2 E-Government 2.0 Adoption and International Local Governments -- 7.2.3 Social Media Adoption by Local Governments -- 7.3 Local Government in Australia -- 7.4 Methodology -- 7.4.1 Web Site Review -- 7.4.2 Twitter Sentiment Analysis -- 7.5 Results -- 7.6 Discussion -- References -- Part III: Adoption and Diffusion -- Chapter 8: Adopting Social Media in the Local Level of Government: Towards a Public Administration 2.0? -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Theoretical Framework: Social Technologies to Innovate Public Administrations.

8.3 Analytic Strategy and Methodology -- 8.4 Data and Results -- 8.4.1 Departments Responsible for the Management of Social Media -- 8.4.2 The Introduction of Policies or Guidance for the Use of Digital Social Media -- 8.4.3 Principal Social Technologies Employed -- 8.4.4 Motivations for the Use of Social Media -- 8.4.5 Perception About the Level of Development of Social Media -- 8.4.6 Inhibitors in the Use of Social Media -- 8.5 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 9: Greek Local E-Government 2.0: Drivers and Outcomes of Social Media Adoption -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Literature Review -- 9.2.1 E-Government 2.0: An Emerging Paradigm Shift -- 9.2.2 Social Media Implementation Strategies -- 9.3 Conceptual Framework -- 9.3.1 Drivers of Social Media Adoption -- 9.3.2 Citizens' Participation Through Social Media: Myth or Measurable Reality -- 9.4 Methodology -- 9.5 Results -- 9.6 Discussion -- 9.7 Conclusions -- 9.8 Limitations and Future Research Suggestions -- References -- Chapter 10: The Diffusion of Microblogging in the Public Sector: Evidence from Chinese Provinces -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The Use of Microblogging in Chinese Public Sectors -- 10.3 Theory and Hypotheses -- 10.3.1 Institutional Characteristics -- 10.3.2 Jurisdictional Attributes -- 10.3.3 Leaders' Championship and Advocacy -- 10.3.4 Inter-Jurisdictional Diffusion Effects -- 10.4 Methods -- 10.4.1 Sample and Data Sources -- 10.4.2 Dependent Variables -- 10.4.3 Independent Variables -- 10.4.4 Analytic Methods -- 10.5 Results -- 10.6 Discussions -- 10.7 Conclusion -- References -- Part IV: Communication and Citizen Engagement -- Chapter 11: Digital Civic Participation in Australian Local Governments: Everyday Practices and Opportunities for Engagement -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Social Media and Civic Engagement in Digital Local Government.

11.3 The Australian Context -- 11.4 Methodology -- 11.5 Digital Civic Engagement with Australian Local Governments -- 11.5.1 Information Dissemination and Service Delivery -- 11.5.2 Civic Participation -- 11.6 Challenges for Local Digital Engagement -- 11.6.1 Barriers to Rural Digital Practices -- 11.6.2 Limitations of Urban Digital Practices -- 11.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 12: The Use of Facebook to Promote Engagement with Local Governments in Spain -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Theoretical Framework and Literature Review -- 12.2.1 Local Population Size -- 12.2.2 Economic Capacity -- 12.2.3 Political Ideology -- 12.2.4 Political Competition -- 12.2.5 Internet Use Among the Population -- 12.2.6 Municipal Debt -- 12.3 Methodology -- 12.3.1 Descriptive Analysis -- 12.3.2 Explanatory Analysis -- 12.3.3 Sample -- 12.4 Results -- 12.5 Discussion -- 12.6 Conclusions -- Appendix -- References -- Chapter 13: Social Media and the City: Analyzing Conversations in Municipal Facebook Pages -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Research Questions and Hypotheses -- 13.3 Methodology -- 13.4 Findings -- 13.4.1 Facebook Presence -- 13.4.2 Engagement Measures of Municipal Facebook Pages -- 13.4.3 Post Origin and Engagement -- 13.4.4 Comparing Activity and Engagement in Election and Non-election Periods -- 13.4.5 Distribution of Fans by Municipality and Period -- 13.5 Discussion -- 13.6 Summary and Conclusions -- References -- Part V: Local Campaigns and Elections -- Chapter 14: The Net Effect of Social Media on Election Results: The Case of Twitter in 2014 Turkish Local Elections -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Background -- 14.2.1 Social Media and Election Campaigns -- 14.2.2 Literature Review: Identifying the Gap -- 14.3 An Empirical Study: Net Effect? -- 14.3.1 Method -- 14.3.2 Data and Model -- 14.3.3 Findings -- 14.4 Discussion -- Conclusion -- References.

Chapter 15: Social Media Indicator and Local Elections in the Netherlands: Towards a Framework for Evaluating the Influence of Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Method and Introducing the Theoretical Framework -- 15.3 Results of the Pilot Study During Local Municipal Elections in the Netherlands -- 15.4 Discussion -- 15.5 Conclusion -- References -- Part VI: Emerging Issues -- Chapter 16: Branding Cities in the Age of Social Media: A Comparative Assessment of Local Government Performance -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Branding Places in a Digital Environment -- 16.2.1 Moving from Spaces to Places -- 16.2.2 Place Branding and Social Media -- 16.3 Methodology -- 16.4 Findings -- 16.5 Discussion -- 16.6 Conclusions and Recommendations -- References -- Chapter 17: Social Media Use in Crisis Communication Management: An Opportunity for Local Communities? -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Crisis Management: From Traditional to Social Media -- 17.3 Social Media Offer New Tools for Crisis Communication Management -- 17.4 The Use of Social Media in Local Communities Facing Crisis Scenarios -- 17.5 Twitter as a Tool for Crisis Management in the Local Context -- 17.6 Some Lessons from the Madrid Arena Crisis as a Case Study -- 17.7 Discussion -- 17.8 Conclusions -- References.

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