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The Challenge of Democracy : Britain 1832-1918.

By: Cunningham, Hugh.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.New History of Britain: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2001Copyright date: ©2002Description: 1 online resource (314 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317883289.Subject(s): Great Britain -- History -- Edward VII, 1901-1910 | Great Britain -- History -- Victoria, 1837-1901 | Great Britain -- History -- William IV, 1830-1837Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Challenge of Democracy : Britain 1832-1918DDC classification: 941 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Series editor's preface -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1 Britain in the 1830s -- The United Kingdom and its governance -- Britain in the world -- The industrial revolution -- Social structure and political power -- Conclusion -- 2 An age of reform? 1832-48 -- The Reform Act of 1832 -- Government, party and reform, 1832-46 -- Chartism -- Central and local government -- Conclusion -- 3 Mid-Victorian Britain -- Parliamentary government -- Reform -- The economy -- Class, gender and nation -- Conclusion -- 4 The progress of the nation? -- Communications -- Science -- History -- Moral progress -- Capitalism -- Conclusion -- 5 Stepping stones towards democracy, 1867-85 -- The practice of politics in the era of the Second Reform Act -- The Liberal party and Gladstone's first ministry -- Disraeli and the Conservative party -- Gladstone's second ministry -- Democracy in the balance sheet -- Conclusion -- 6 The Conservative ascendancy, 1885-1905 -- The Liberals and home rule -- The Conservative party, 1885-1905 -- The course of politics, 1886 -1905 -- The rise of labour -- Conclusion -- 7 An urban society: Britain, 1850-1918 -- The growth of towns -- Consumption and lifestyles -- Diagnoses and remedies -- Conclusion -- 8 Empire and nation: the British and their identities -- Empire -- Nations -- Conclusion -- 9 The birth of the modern state? Britain, 1905-14 -- Reshaping the constitution: the Lords and the Irish -- The role of the state -- Labour -- Women -- Foreign policy -- Conclusion -- 10 Britain at war, 1914-18 -- August 1914-spring 1915 -- The Asquith coalition, May 1915-December 1916 -- The Lloyd George coalition, December 1916-December 1918 -- Society and the state -- Conclusion -- 11 Britain in 1918 -- Chronology -- Notes -- Further Reading -- Index.
Summary: This authoritative and thought-provoking history takes a fresh view of what was a period of unprecedented and rapid change. Assuming no prior knowledge of the subject, Hugh Cunningham provides a clear narrative of political events, and an analysis of change and continuity in ideas and in economic and social structure. Britain is set firmly in the context of world power and the possession of empire. An overarching theme is the challenge presented by democracy in a period framed by the First and Fourth Reform Acts. 'Democracy' had no stable meaning, and its opponents were just as vocal as its advocates. The book explores its implications for the role of the state, for the governance of empire, and for the relationship between the different nations within the United Kingdom.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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DA550 -- .C866 2014 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1829406 Available EBC1829406

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Series editor's preface -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1 Britain in the 1830s -- The United Kingdom and its governance -- Britain in the world -- The industrial revolution -- Social structure and political power -- Conclusion -- 2 An age of reform? 1832-48 -- The Reform Act of 1832 -- Government, party and reform, 1832-46 -- Chartism -- Central and local government -- Conclusion -- 3 Mid-Victorian Britain -- Parliamentary government -- Reform -- The economy -- Class, gender and nation -- Conclusion -- 4 The progress of the nation? -- Communications -- Science -- History -- Moral progress -- Capitalism -- Conclusion -- 5 Stepping stones towards democracy, 1867-85 -- The practice of politics in the era of the Second Reform Act -- The Liberal party and Gladstone's first ministry -- Disraeli and the Conservative party -- Gladstone's second ministry -- Democracy in the balance sheet -- Conclusion -- 6 The Conservative ascendancy, 1885-1905 -- The Liberals and home rule -- The Conservative party, 1885-1905 -- The course of politics, 1886 -1905 -- The rise of labour -- Conclusion -- 7 An urban society: Britain, 1850-1918 -- The growth of towns -- Consumption and lifestyles -- Diagnoses and remedies -- Conclusion -- 8 Empire and nation: the British and their identities -- Empire -- Nations -- Conclusion -- 9 The birth of the modern state? Britain, 1905-14 -- Reshaping the constitution: the Lords and the Irish -- The role of the state -- Labour -- Women -- Foreign policy -- Conclusion -- 10 Britain at war, 1914-18 -- August 1914-spring 1915 -- The Asquith coalition, May 1915-December 1916 -- The Lloyd George coalition, December 1916-December 1918 -- Society and the state -- Conclusion -- 11 Britain in 1918 -- Chronology -- Notes -- Further Reading -- Index.

This authoritative and thought-provoking history takes a fresh view of what was a period of unprecedented and rapid change. Assuming no prior knowledge of the subject, Hugh Cunningham provides a clear narrative of political events, and an analysis of change and continuity in ideas and in economic and social structure. Britain is set firmly in the context of world power and the possession of empire. An overarching theme is the challenge presented by democracy in a period framed by the First and Fourth Reform Acts. 'Democracy' had no stable meaning, and its opponents were just as vocal as its advocates. The book explores its implications for the role of the state, for the governance of empire, and for the relationship between the different nations within the United Kingdom.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Hugh Cunningham is Professor of Social History, University of Kent. He is the author of several books, including the highly-regarded Children and Childhood in Western Society since 1500 (Longman, 1995).</p>

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