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Bicycles, Bangs, and Bloomers : The New Woman in the Popular Press.

By: Marks, Patricia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (236 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813158631.Subject(s): Feminism -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Women -- Press coverage -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century | Women -- Press coverage -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Women''s rights -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century | Women''s rights -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Bicycles, Bangs, and Bloomers : The New Woman in the Popular PressDDC classification: 071.3082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Preface -- Introduction: Queen Victoria's Granddaughter -- 1. Women and Marriage: "Running in Blinkers" -- 2. Women's Work: More "Bloomin' Bad Bizness" -- 3. Women's Education: "Maddest Folly Going" -- 4. Women's Clubs: "Girls Will Be Girls" -- 5. Women's Fashions: The Shape of Things to Come -- 6. Women's Athletics: A Bicycle Built for One -- Conclusion: The New Woman -- Works Cited -- Index.
Summary: The so-called "New Woman" -- that determined and free-wheeling figure in "rational" dress, demanding education, suffrage, and a career-was a frequent target for humorists in the popular press of the late nineteenth century. She invariably stood in contrast to the "womanly woman," a traditional figure bound to domestic concerns and a stereotype away from which many women were inexorably moving. Patricia Marks's book, based on a survey of satires and caricatures drawn from British and American periodicals of the 1880s and 1890s, places the popular view of the New Woman in the context of the age and explores the ways in which humor both reflected and shaped readers' perceptions of women's changing roles. Not all commentators of the period attacked the New Woman; even conservative satirists were more concerned with poverty, prostitution, and inadequate education than with defending so-called "femininity." Yet, as the influx of women into the economic mainstream changed social patterns, the popular press responded with humor ranging from the witty to the vituperative. Many of Marks's sources have never been reprinted and exist only in unindexed periodicals. Her book thus provides a valuable resource for those studying the rise of feminism and the influence of popular culture, as well as literary historians and critics seeking to place more formal genres within a cultural framework. Historians, sociologists, and others with an interest in Victorianism will find in it much to savor.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN4888.W65.M375 199 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1915386 Available EBC1915386

Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Preface -- Introduction: Queen Victoria's Granddaughter -- 1. Women and Marriage: "Running in Blinkers" -- 2. Women's Work: More "Bloomin' Bad Bizness" -- 3. Women's Education: "Maddest Folly Going" -- 4. Women's Clubs: "Girls Will Be Girls" -- 5. Women's Fashions: The Shape of Things to Come -- 6. Women's Athletics: A Bicycle Built for One -- Conclusion: The New Woman -- Works Cited -- Index.

The so-called "New Woman" -- that determined and free-wheeling figure in "rational" dress, demanding education, suffrage, and a career-was a frequent target for humorists in the popular press of the late nineteenth century. She invariably stood in contrast to the "womanly woman," a traditional figure bound to domestic concerns and a stereotype away from which many women were inexorably moving. Patricia Marks's book, based on a survey of satires and caricatures drawn from British and American periodicals of the 1880s and 1890s, places the popular view of the New Woman in the context of the age and explores the ways in which humor both reflected and shaped readers' perceptions of women's changing roles. Not all commentators of the period attacked the New Woman; even conservative satirists were more concerned with poverty, prostitution, and inadequate education than with defending so-called "femininity." Yet, as the influx of women into the economic mainstream changed social patterns, the popular press responded with humor ranging from the witty to the vituperative. Many of Marks's sources have never been reprinted and exist only in unindexed periodicals. Her book thus provides a valuable resource for those studying the rise of feminism and the influence of popular culture, as well as literary historians and critics seeking to place more formal genres within a cultural framework. Historians, sociologists, and others with an interest in Victorianism will find in it much to savor.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Patricia Marks , professor of English at Valdosta State College, is author of American Literary and Drama Reviews and co-author of The Smiling Muse: Victoriana in the Comic Press .</p>

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