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Confident Pluralism : Surviving and Thriving through Deep Difference.

By: Inazu, John D.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago, IL : University of Chicago Press, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (177 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780226365596.Subject(s): Constitutional law - Social aspects - United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Confident Pluralism : Surviving and Thriving through Deep DifferenceDDC classification: 349.73 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Introduction -- Part I. Constitutional Commitments -- 1. Our Modest Unity: Rights, Inclusion, and Dissent -- 2. The Voluntary Groups Requirement: Rehabilitating the Right of Association -- 3. The Public Forum Requirement: Public Spaces, Private Forums, and Parks & Recreation -- 4. The Public Funding Requirement: Tax Exemptions, Student Forums, and Government Orthodoxies -- Part II. Civic Practices -- 5. Civic Aspirations: Tolerance, Humility, and Patience -- 6. Living Speech: Rising above Insults and Bullying -- 7. Collective Action: Protests, Boycotts, and Strikes -- 8. Common Ground: Relationships across Difference -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Index.
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Contents -- Introduction -- Part I. Constitutional Commitments -- 1. Our Modest Unity: Rights, Inclusion, and Dissent -- 2. The Voluntary Groups Requirement: Rehabilitating the Right of Association -- 3. The Public Forum Requirement: Public Spaces, Private Forums, and Parks & Recreation -- 4. The Public Funding Requirement: Tax Exemptions, Student Forums, and Government Orthodoxies -- Part II. Civic Practices -- 5. Civic Aspirations: Tolerance, Humility, and Patience -- 6. Living Speech: Rising above Insults and Bullying -- 7. Collective Action: Protests, Boycotts, and Strikes -- 8. Common Ground: Relationships across Difference -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Index.

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CHOICE Review

Inazu (Washington Univ., St. Louis) offers an important new consideration of the value of pluralism for American democratic society. He begins his analysis by pointing to numerous examples suggesting that the US has moved away from being a pluralistic society and that the country does not value genuine differences of opinion and open debate. Instead, people on different sides of contending issues try to silence one another, and differing opinions are not considered legitimate or worthy of consideration. This has led some to the dispiriting conclusion that pluralism is at an end in America, and Inazu reflects that such an end would be a very bad thing. Challenging this bleak view, he proposes what he calls confident pluralism as a solution. Confident pluralism, Inazu explains, is a political solution to the problem of deep and pervasive differences in the electorate. It recognizes difference and even invites it while acknowledging the need for consensus and unity in political life. The end of confident pluralism is not to resolve all issues but to allow individuals to function despite their differences. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers through faculty. --Eric C. Sands, Berry College

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