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Fighting Corruption Collectively : How Successful are Sector-Specific Coordinated Governance Initiatives in Curbing Corruption?.

By: van Schoor, Berta.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Wirtschaftsethik in der globalisierten Welt: Publisher: Wiesbaden : Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (232 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783658178383.Subject(s): Business ethicsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Fighting Corruption Collectively : How Successful are Sector-Specific Coordinated Governance Initiatives in Curbing Corruption?DDC classification: 364.1323 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Table of contents -- List of Tables -- List of Figures -- List of Abbreviations -- Danksagung -- Abstract -- 1 INTRODUCTION -- 2 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND. SELF-INTEREST AS A MEANS OF PREVENTING CORRUPTION -- 2.1 Corruption as a Societal Challenge in the 21st Century -- 2.1.1 Delimiting Corruption -- 2.1.2 Defini ng Corruption -- 2.1.3 Categorizing Corruption -- 2.1.4 Conceptualizing Corruption -- 2.1.4.1 Corruption as a Principal-Agent Problem -- 2.1.4.2 Corruption as a Collective Action Problem -- 2.1.4.3 Corruption from an Order Ethics' Perspective -- 2.1.5 Assessing Corruption -- 2.1.5.1 Macro Effects -- 2.1.5.2 Micro Effects -- 2.1.5.3 Quantification of the Effects of Corruption -- 2.2 Coordinated Governance Initiatives as a New Approach for Curbing Corruption -- 2.2.1 International Anti-Corruption Eff orts in Historical Perspective -- 2.2.1.1 Intergovernmental Cooperation: Anti-Corruption Conventions and Treaties ('Hard Law') -- 2.2.1.2 Increasing Participation of the Private Sector: Non-Binding Guide-lines and Codes of Conduct ('Soft Law') -- 2.2.2 Overcoming the Governance Gap -- 2.2.3 Governance Structure and Overview of Coordinated Governance Initiatives -- 2.2.4 Potential Success Factors of Coordinated Governance Initiatives -- 2.2.5 Empirical Basis for the Assessment of Anti-Corruption Initiatives -- 2.3 Summary -- 3 METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH -- 3.1 Problem Statement and Research Aims -- 3.2 Research Paradigm and Strategy -- 3.3 Research Design: Multiple-Case Study Design -- 3.4 Purposive Sampling: Case Selection -- 3.5 Data Collection: Interviews and Documents -- 3.6 Data Analysis: Template Analysis -- 3.7 Limitations of the Multiple-Case Study -- 4 MULTIPLE-CASE STUDY ANALYSIS -- 4.1 EMB Case -- 4.1.1 Profile, Origin, and Sector Characteristics -- 4.1.1.1 Origins: Corruption Scandal in the Bavarian Construction Sector.
4.1.1.2 Competitive Structure and Ethical Risks in the Construction Sector -- 4.1.2 Organizational Set-up and Operational Procedures -- 4.1.2.1 EMB Governance and Funding -- 4.1.2.2 The EMB Commitment Process: Four Binding Elements -- 4.1.3 Success Factors - General View -- 4.1.4 Embeddedness in an Established Institutional Framework -- 4.1.5 Highly Committed Participants -- 4.1.6 Lean Governance Structure -- 4.1.7 Repeated External Audits -- 4.1.8 Competitive Advantages -- 4.2 EITI Case -- 4.2.1 Profile, Origin, and Sector Characteristics -- 4.2.1.1 Origins: The Resource Curse and the Role of Civil Society -- 4.2.1.2 Legal Framework of the Extractive Industry -- 4.2.2 Organizational Set-up and Operational Procedures -- 4.2.2.1 EITI Governance and Governing Bodies -- 4.2.2.2 International Supporters and EITI Funding -- 4.2.2.3 The EITI Commitment Process: From Candidature to Compliance -- 4.2.3 Success Factors - General View -- 4.2.4 Supportive Institutional Framework -- 4.2.5 Representation of Diverse Interests -- 4.2.6 Narrow Scope of Objectives -- 4.2.7 Flexible Governance Structure -- 4.2.8 Ability to Enforce Rules -- 4.2.9 Country-Ownership -- 4.3 MACN Case -- 4.3.1 Profile, Origin, and Sector Characteristics -- 4.3.2 Organizational Set-up and Operational Procedures -- 4.3.2.1 MACN Governance and Funding -- 4.3.2.2 The MACN Commitment Process: Seven Anti-Corruption Principles -- 4.3.3 Success Factors - General View -- 4.3.4 Awareness-Raising within the Maritime Sector -- 4.3.5 Knowledge and Experience Sharing Among Participants -- 4.3.6 Self-Assessment and Reporting Requirements -- 4.3.7 Creation of Tangible Benefi ts through Local Collective Actions -- 4.3.8 Visibility towards and Recognition by External Stakeholders -- 5 CROSS-CASE AN ALYSIS AND DISCUSSION -- 5.1 Initiatives' Company Composition.
5.2 Situations of Crisis and External Threats as Initiating Factors -- 5.3 Existence of a Supportive Institutional Framework -- 5.4 Continuing Commitment of Participants -- 5.5 Complexity-Dependent Governance Structures and Procedures -- 5.6 Enforcement Mechanisms for Reputation Protection -- 6 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- APPENDICES -- Appendix 1: Interview Guide -- Appendix 2: List of Documents Analyzed - EMB Case -- Appendix 3: List of Documents Analyzed - EITI Case -- Appendix 4: List of Documents Analyzed - MACN Case.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
B1-5802 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4855746 Available EBC4855746

Table of contents -- List of Tables -- List of Figures -- List of Abbreviations -- Danksagung -- Abstract -- 1 INTRODUCTION -- 2 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND. SELF-INTEREST AS A MEANS OF PREVENTING CORRUPTION -- 2.1 Corruption as a Societal Challenge in the 21st Century -- 2.1.1 Delimiting Corruption -- 2.1.2 Defini ng Corruption -- 2.1.3 Categorizing Corruption -- 2.1.4 Conceptualizing Corruption -- 2.1.4.1 Corruption as a Principal-Agent Problem -- 2.1.4.2 Corruption as a Collective Action Problem -- 2.1.4.3 Corruption from an Order Ethics' Perspective -- 2.1.5 Assessing Corruption -- 2.1.5.1 Macro Effects -- 2.1.5.2 Micro Effects -- 2.1.5.3 Quantification of the Effects of Corruption -- 2.2 Coordinated Governance Initiatives as a New Approach for Curbing Corruption -- 2.2.1 International Anti-Corruption Eff orts in Historical Perspective -- 2.2.1.1 Intergovernmental Cooperation: Anti-Corruption Conventions and Treaties ('Hard Law') -- 2.2.1.2 Increasing Participation of the Private Sector: Non-Binding Guide-lines and Codes of Conduct ('Soft Law') -- 2.2.2 Overcoming the Governance Gap -- 2.2.3 Governance Structure and Overview of Coordinated Governance Initiatives -- 2.2.4 Potential Success Factors of Coordinated Governance Initiatives -- 2.2.5 Empirical Basis for the Assessment of Anti-Corruption Initiatives -- 2.3 Summary -- 3 METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH -- 3.1 Problem Statement and Research Aims -- 3.2 Research Paradigm and Strategy -- 3.3 Research Design: Multiple-Case Study Design -- 3.4 Purposive Sampling: Case Selection -- 3.5 Data Collection: Interviews and Documents -- 3.6 Data Analysis: Template Analysis -- 3.7 Limitations of the Multiple-Case Study -- 4 MULTIPLE-CASE STUDY ANALYSIS -- 4.1 EMB Case -- 4.1.1 Profile, Origin, and Sector Characteristics -- 4.1.1.1 Origins: Corruption Scandal in the Bavarian Construction Sector.

4.1.1.2 Competitive Structure and Ethical Risks in the Construction Sector -- 4.1.2 Organizational Set-up and Operational Procedures -- 4.1.2.1 EMB Governance and Funding -- 4.1.2.2 The EMB Commitment Process: Four Binding Elements -- 4.1.3 Success Factors - General View -- 4.1.4 Embeddedness in an Established Institutional Framework -- 4.1.5 Highly Committed Participants -- 4.1.6 Lean Governance Structure -- 4.1.7 Repeated External Audits -- 4.1.8 Competitive Advantages -- 4.2 EITI Case -- 4.2.1 Profile, Origin, and Sector Characteristics -- 4.2.1.1 Origins: The Resource Curse and the Role of Civil Society -- 4.2.1.2 Legal Framework of the Extractive Industry -- 4.2.2 Organizational Set-up and Operational Procedures -- 4.2.2.1 EITI Governance and Governing Bodies -- 4.2.2.2 International Supporters and EITI Funding -- 4.2.2.3 The EITI Commitment Process: From Candidature to Compliance -- 4.2.3 Success Factors - General View -- 4.2.4 Supportive Institutional Framework -- 4.2.5 Representation of Diverse Interests -- 4.2.6 Narrow Scope of Objectives -- 4.2.7 Flexible Governance Structure -- 4.2.8 Ability to Enforce Rules -- 4.2.9 Country-Ownership -- 4.3 MACN Case -- 4.3.1 Profile, Origin, and Sector Characteristics -- 4.3.2 Organizational Set-up and Operational Procedures -- 4.3.2.1 MACN Governance and Funding -- 4.3.2.2 The MACN Commitment Process: Seven Anti-Corruption Principles -- 4.3.3 Success Factors - General View -- 4.3.4 Awareness-Raising within the Maritime Sector -- 4.3.5 Knowledge and Experience Sharing Among Participants -- 4.3.6 Self-Assessment and Reporting Requirements -- 4.3.7 Creation of Tangible Benefi ts through Local Collective Actions -- 4.3.8 Visibility towards and Recognition by External Stakeholders -- 5 CROSS-CASE AN ALYSIS AND DISCUSSION -- 5.1 Initiatives' Company Composition.

5.2 Situations of Crisis and External Threats as Initiating Factors -- 5.3 Existence of a Supportive Institutional Framework -- 5.4 Continuing Commitment of Participants -- 5.5 Complexity-Dependent Governance Structures and Procedures -- 5.6 Enforcement Mechanisms for Reputation Protection -- 6 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- APPENDICES -- Appendix 1: Interview Guide -- Appendix 2: List of Documents Analyzed - EMB Case -- Appendix 3: List of Documents Analyzed - EITI Case -- Appendix 4: List of Documents Analyzed - MACN Case.

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