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Marketing Renewable Energy : Concepts, Business Models and Cases.

By: Herbes, Carsten.
Contributor(s): Friege, Christian.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Management for Professionals: Publisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (398 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319464275.Subject(s): Renewable energy sourcesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Marketing Renewable Energy : Concepts, Business Models and CasesDDC classification: 658.8 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface -- Contents -- List of Contributors -- Part I: Foundations of Renewable Energy Marketing -- Some Basic Concepts for Marketing Renewable Energy -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Marketing 3.0 -- 3 Attributes of Renewable Energies and Their Effects on the Marketing of Renewable Energy -- 4 Aims of Consumers When Buying Renewable Energy -- 5 Marketing Mix for Renewable Energy -- 5.1 Product Policy for Renewable Energy -- 5.2 Pricing Policy for Renewable Energy -- 5.3 Distribution Policy for Renewable Energy -- 5.4 Communication Policy for Renewable Energy -- 6 Relevance of Renewable Energy as an Input Factor in Marketing Other Goods and Services -- 7 Summary: Most Important Steps for the Successful Marketing of Renewable Energy -- References -- Global Markets and Trends for Renewables -- 1 Support Schemes for Renewable Energies -- 1.1 Support Schemes for Renewable Electricity -- 1.2 Support Schemes for Renewable Heat -- 1.3 Support Schemes for Renewable Fuels -- 1.4 Policy Measures and Targets Worldwide -- 2 Primary Energy Consumption from Nonrenewable Sources -- 2.1 Status Quo -- 2.2 Trend 2020 -- 3 Utilization and Markets of Renewable Energies -- 3.1 Renewable Electricity Production and Application -- 3.1.1 Status Quo -- 3.1.2 Trend 2020 -- 3.2 Renewable Heat Production and Application -- 3.2.1 Status Quo -- 3.2.2 Trend 2020 -- 3.3 Renewable Fuel Production and Application -- 3.3.1 Status Quo -- 3.3.2 Trend 2020 -- 3.4 Relevance of Renewable Energy Sector -- 3.4.1 Status Quo -- 3.4.2 Trend 2020 -- References -- Consumer Preferences for Renewable Energy -- 1 Introduction -- 2 On the Concept of Preferences -- 2.1 Consumer Preferences and Consumer Responsibility -- 2.2 Preferences, Attitudes and Behavior -- 3 Methods of Preference Elicitation -- 3.1 The Special Case of Environmental Goods -- 3.2 The Problem of Incentive Compatibility.
4 Consumer Preferences for Renewable Energy -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Direct Selling of Renewable Energy Products -- 1 Problem -- 2 Basics of Direct Selling -- 2.1 Definition of Direct Selling -- 2.2 Direct Selling as an Element of Multichannel Strategies -- 3 Direct Sales of Renewable Energy Products -- 3.1 Special Features of Direct Sales of RE Products -- 3.2 Checklist for the Successful Direct Sales of RE Products -- 4 Green Electricity in Direct Sales -- 5 Summary and Outlook -- References -- Market Segmentation for Green Electricity Marketing Results of a Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis with German Electricity Consum... -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Related Research -- 3 Study Design -- 3.1 Investigating Stated Preference with Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis -- 3.2 Market Segmentation -- 3.3 Methodology -- 4 Results -- 4.1 Preferences for Different Product Attributes -- 4.2 Market Segments Analyzed by Sociodemographic, Psychographic, and Behavioral Characteristics -- 5 Conclusions and Recommendations -- References -- Introducing Green Electricity as the Default Option -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 If the Mountain Won´t Come to Muhammad -- 1.2 Is the Green Default Legitimate? -- 1.3 Examples from Other Industries -- 2 Case Study -- 2.1 Initial Situation of St. Galler Stadtwerke -- Facts about St. Galler Stadtwerke -- 2.2 Referendum in 2010, Research Project in 2011 -- 2.2.1 Eye Tracking: Identifying Customer Requirements -- Eye Tracking as a Method of Market Research -- 2.2.2 Results of Research Project -- 2.3 Implementation in 2012 -- 2.4 Customer Feedback and Financial Implications -- 3 Conclusion -- References -- Certificates in Germany´s Renewable Energy Market -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Additional Ecological Benefit -- 1.2 Marketability -- 2 Certification of Green Power Generation -- 2.1 Guarantee of Origin´´.
2.1.1 Purpose and Requirement of Certificate -- 2.1.2 Provider/Certification Agent -- 2.2 Erzeugung EE (TÜV Süd Industrie Service GmbH) -- 2.2.1 Aim of Certificate -- 2.2.2 Requirements -- 2.2.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 2.2.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 3 Certification of Green Power Products -- Green Power Models -- 3.1 Grüner Strom Label (Grüner Strom Label e.V.) -- 3.1.1 Aim of Certificate -- 3.1.2 Requirements -- 3.1.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 3.1.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 3.2 Ok-power Label (EnergieVision e.V.) -- 3.2.1 Aim of Certificate -- 3.2.2 Requirements -- 3.2.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 3.2.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 3.3 Produkt EE01/EE02 (TÜV Süd Industrie Service GmbH) -- 3.3.1 Aim of the Certificate -- 3.3.2 Requirements -- 3.3.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 3.3.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 3.4 Geprüfter Ökostrom (TÜV Nord Cert GmbH) -- 3.4.1 Aim of the Certificate -- 3.4.2 Requirements -- 3.4.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 3.4.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 4 Current Challenges and Possible Solutions -- 4.1 Climate Electricity Model -- 4.2 Green Power Market Model -- 4.3 Regional Green Power Labeling -- 4.4 Closing Assessment and Outlook -- References -- Part II: Special Markets and New Business Models -- Marketing of Biomethane -- 1 Introduction: Market Development -- 2 Players in the Value Chain -- 3 Utilization Paths and Their Influencing Factors -- 3.1 Market for Electricity Generation in CHP Units -- 3.2 Heating Market -- 3.3 Market for Vehicle Fuels -- 3.4 Material Use -- 4 Suppliers´ Marketing Mix -- 4.1 Product Policy -- 4.2 Pricing Policy -- 4.3 Distribution Policy -- 4.4 Communication Policy -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Renewable Energies in the Contracting Market -- 1 Basic Principles of Contracting.
1.1 Definition and Benefits of Contracting -- 1.2 Contracting Models -- 1.2.1 Energy Supply Contracting -- 1.2.2 Savings Contracting (Energy Savings Contracting) -- 1.2.3 Technical Plant Management (Operations Management Contracting) -- 1.2.4 Financing Contracting -- 2 Renewable Forms Used in Contracting -- 2.1 Photovoltaics (PV) -- 2.2 Solar Heating -- 2.3 Biogas -- 2.4 Solid Biomass -- 2.5 Biogenic Residues -- 2.6 Geothermal Energy -- 2.7 Wind Power -- 2.8 Hydropower -- 3 Using Renewables in Contracting: Key Factors and Challenges -- 4 Renewables Contracting in Practice: Select Examples -- 4.1 Solar Heating -- 4.2 Biogas (Biomethane) -- 4.3 Solid Biomass -- 4.4 Biogenic Residues -- 5 Conclusion -- Renewable Energy in the Marketing of Tourism Companies -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Tourism Companies and Sustainable Marketing -- 2.1 Digression: Service Providers -- 2.1.1 Transport Providers -- 2.1.2 Hospitality Industry -- 2.1.3 Destinations -- 3 Uniform Criteria for Sustainable Tourism -- 4 Corporate Example -- 4.1 Studiosus Reisen München GmbH -- 5 A Brief Summary -- References -- From Energy Supplier to Capacity Manager: New Business Models in Green and Decentralized Energy Markets -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The Energy Market Is a Political Market -- 1.2 Situation in the ``Old World´´ of Energy Retailers -- 1.3 Chapter Structure -- 2 Our Vision: From Energy Supplier to Capacity Manager -- 3 The Energy Sector Will Become Decentralized and Renewable -- 3.1 The Decentralization of Electrical Power Generation -- 3.2 Developments and Challenges for Renewable and CHP Installations -- 3.3 The Markets for Electricity and Heating Will Continue to Converge -- 4 Advancing the Electricity Market Design and Core Tasks for the Future -- 4.1 Energy System Capabilities -- 4.2 Continuous Development of the Electricity Market Design.
4.2.1 Current State of Conventional Power Plants -- 4.2.2 Market and Regulatory Components for the Future -- 4.2.3 State of Debate About the Future Design of the Electricity Market -- 4.2.4 Description of Five Main Models for the Design of the Future Power Market with Capacity Mechanisms in Germany -- 4.3 Capacity Management as One of the Key Business Models of the Future -- 5 Business Models for Energy Suppliers and Utilities in the ``New World´´ -- 5.1 Structuring and Description of Future Business Models -- 5.1.1 Development of a Vision for the Future of the Energy Market -- 5.1.2 Structuring and Description of Future Business Models -- 5.1.3 Value Chain of Energy Transition Business Opportunities -- 5.1.4 Criteria for Assessing and Selecting the most Promising Business Opportunities -- 5.2 Selected Examples of Business Models -- 5.2.1 Self-Consumption of Solar Energy for Households -- 5.2.2 Model for ``Tenant Electricity´´ from a Mini CHP Unit -- 5.2.3 Factors That Influence the Economic Efficiency of Energy Transition Business Models -- 5.2.4 Challenges for Municipal Utilities -- 5.3 Conclusions -- 6 Strategy Development and Organization for Future Business Models -- 6.1 Development of Positioning, Aims, and Strategies -- 6.2 Needs of Municipal Utilities in Germany in Current Market Environment -- 6.3 New Business Models Require New Structures and Processes -- 6.4 Process Model for the Development, Production, and Marketing of Energy-Related Products and Services -- 6.5 Conclusions -- 7 Summary: Main Points Concerning the Future of Energy Companies -- References -- Driving Renewables: Business Models for the Integration of Renewable Energy and e-Mobility in Europe -- 1 Introduction -- 2 E-Mobility Basics -- 3 Regulatory and Market Framework in Europe -- 3.1 European Versus National Regulation -- 3.1.1 Market Situation.
3.1.2 Regulatory Situation.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HF4999.2-6182 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4884369 Available EBC4884369

Preface -- Contents -- List of Contributors -- Part I: Foundations of Renewable Energy Marketing -- Some Basic Concepts for Marketing Renewable Energy -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Marketing 3.0 -- 3 Attributes of Renewable Energies and Their Effects on the Marketing of Renewable Energy -- 4 Aims of Consumers When Buying Renewable Energy -- 5 Marketing Mix for Renewable Energy -- 5.1 Product Policy for Renewable Energy -- 5.2 Pricing Policy for Renewable Energy -- 5.3 Distribution Policy for Renewable Energy -- 5.4 Communication Policy for Renewable Energy -- 6 Relevance of Renewable Energy as an Input Factor in Marketing Other Goods and Services -- 7 Summary: Most Important Steps for the Successful Marketing of Renewable Energy -- References -- Global Markets and Trends for Renewables -- 1 Support Schemes for Renewable Energies -- 1.1 Support Schemes for Renewable Electricity -- 1.2 Support Schemes for Renewable Heat -- 1.3 Support Schemes for Renewable Fuels -- 1.4 Policy Measures and Targets Worldwide -- 2 Primary Energy Consumption from Nonrenewable Sources -- 2.1 Status Quo -- 2.2 Trend 2020 -- 3 Utilization and Markets of Renewable Energies -- 3.1 Renewable Electricity Production and Application -- 3.1.1 Status Quo -- 3.1.2 Trend 2020 -- 3.2 Renewable Heat Production and Application -- 3.2.1 Status Quo -- 3.2.2 Trend 2020 -- 3.3 Renewable Fuel Production and Application -- 3.3.1 Status Quo -- 3.3.2 Trend 2020 -- 3.4 Relevance of Renewable Energy Sector -- 3.4.1 Status Quo -- 3.4.2 Trend 2020 -- References -- Consumer Preferences for Renewable Energy -- 1 Introduction -- 2 On the Concept of Preferences -- 2.1 Consumer Preferences and Consumer Responsibility -- 2.2 Preferences, Attitudes and Behavior -- 3 Methods of Preference Elicitation -- 3.1 The Special Case of Environmental Goods -- 3.2 The Problem of Incentive Compatibility.

4 Consumer Preferences for Renewable Energy -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Direct Selling of Renewable Energy Products -- 1 Problem -- 2 Basics of Direct Selling -- 2.1 Definition of Direct Selling -- 2.2 Direct Selling as an Element of Multichannel Strategies -- 3 Direct Sales of Renewable Energy Products -- 3.1 Special Features of Direct Sales of RE Products -- 3.2 Checklist for the Successful Direct Sales of RE Products -- 4 Green Electricity in Direct Sales -- 5 Summary and Outlook -- References -- Market Segmentation for Green Electricity Marketing Results of a Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis with German Electricity Consum... -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Related Research -- 3 Study Design -- 3.1 Investigating Stated Preference with Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis -- 3.2 Market Segmentation -- 3.3 Methodology -- 4 Results -- 4.1 Preferences for Different Product Attributes -- 4.2 Market Segments Analyzed by Sociodemographic, Psychographic, and Behavioral Characteristics -- 5 Conclusions and Recommendations -- References -- Introducing Green Electricity as the Default Option -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 If the Mountain Won´t Come to Muhammad -- 1.2 Is the Green Default Legitimate? -- 1.3 Examples from Other Industries -- 2 Case Study -- 2.1 Initial Situation of St. Galler Stadtwerke -- Facts about St. Galler Stadtwerke -- 2.2 Referendum in 2010, Research Project in 2011 -- 2.2.1 Eye Tracking: Identifying Customer Requirements -- Eye Tracking as a Method of Market Research -- 2.2.2 Results of Research Project -- 2.3 Implementation in 2012 -- 2.4 Customer Feedback and Financial Implications -- 3 Conclusion -- References -- Certificates in Germany´s Renewable Energy Market -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Additional Ecological Benefit -- 1.2 Marketability -- 2 Certification of Green Power Generation -- 2.1 Guarantee of Origin´´.

2.1.1 Purpose and Requirement of Certificate -- 2.1.2 Provider/Certification Agent -- 2.2 Erzeugung EE (TÜV Süd Industrie Service GmbH) -- 2.2.1 Aim of Certificate -- 2.2.2 Requirements -- 2.2.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 2.2.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 3 Certification of Green Power Products -- Green Power Models -- 3.1 Grüner Strom Label (Grüner Strom Label e.V.) -- 3.1.1 Aim of Certificate -- 3.1.2 Requirements -- 3.1.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 3.1.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 3.2 Ok-power Label (EnergieVision e.V.) -- 3.2.1 Aim of Certificate -- 3.2.2 Requirements -- 3.2.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 3.2.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 3.3 Produkt EE01/EE02 (TÜV Süd Industrie Service GmbH) -- 3.3.1 Aim of the Certificate -- 3.3.2 Requirements -- 3.3.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 3.3.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 3.4 Geprüfter Ökostrom (TÜV Nord Cert GmbH) -- 3.4.1 Aim of the Certificate -- 3.4.2 Requirements -- 3.4.3 Provider/Certification Agent -- 3.4.4 Target Audience and Marketability -- 4 Current Challenges and Possible Solutions -- 4.1 Climate Electricity Model -- 4.2 Green Power Market Model -- 4.3 Regional Green Power Labeling -- 4.4 Closing Assessment and Outlook -- References -- Part II: Special Markets and New Business Models -- Marketing of Biomethane -- 1 Introduction: Market Development -- 2 Players in the Value Chain -- 3 Utilization Paths and Their Influencing Factors -- 3.1 Market for Electricity Generation in CHP Units -- 3.2 Heating Market -- 3.3 Market for Vehicle Fuels -- 3.4 Material Use -- 4 Suppliers´ Marketing Mix -- 4.1 Product Policy -- 4.2 Pricing Policy -- 4.3 Distribution Policy -- 4.4 Communication Policy -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Renewable Energies in the Contracting Market -- 1 Basic Principles of Contracting.

1.1 Definition and Benefits of Contracting -- 1.2 Contracting Models -- 1.2.1 Energy Supply Contracting -- 1.2.2 Savings Contracting (Energy Savings Contracting) -- 1.2.3 Technical Plant Management (Operations Management Contracting) -- 1.2.4 Financing Contracting -- 2 Renewable Forms Used in Contracting -- 2.1 Photovoltaics (PV) -- 2.2 Solar Heating -- 2.3 Biogas -- 2.4 Solid Biomass -- 2.5 Biogenic Residues -- 2.6 Geothermal Energy -- 2.7 Wind Power -- 2.8 Hydropower -- 3 Using Renewables in Contracting: Key Factors and Challenges -- 4 Renewables Contracting in Practice: Select Examples -- 4.1 Solar Heating -- 4.2 Biogas (Biomethane) -- 4.3 Solid Biomass -- 4.4 Biogenic Residues -- 5 Conclusion -- Renewable Energy in the Marketing of Tourism Companies -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Tourism Companies and Sustainable Marketing -- 2.1 Digression: Service Providers -- 2.1.1 Transport Providers -- 2.1.2 Hospitality Industry -- 2.1.3 Destinations -- 3 Uniform Criteria for Sustainable Tourism -- 4 Corporate Example -- 4.1 Studiosus Reisen München GmbH -- 5 A Brief Summary -- References -- From Energy Supplier to Capacity Manager: New Business Models in Green and Decentralized Energy Markets -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The Energy Market Is a Political Market -- 1.2 Situation in the ``Old World´´ of Energy Retailers -- 1.3 Chapter Structure -- 2 Our Vision: From Energy Supplier to Capacity Manager -- 3 The Energy Sector Will Become Decentralized and Renewable -- 3.1 The Decentralization of Electrical Power Generation -- 3.2 Developments and Challenges for Renewable and CHP Installations -- 3.3 The Markets for Electricity and Heating Will Continue to Converge -- 4 Advancing the Electricity Market Design and Core Tasks for the Future -- 4.1 Energy System Capabilities -- 4.2 Continuous Development of the Electricity Market Design.

4.2.1 Current State of Conventional Power Plants -- 4.2.2 Market and Regulatory Components for the Future -- 4.2.3 State of Debate About the Future Design of the Electricity Market -- 4.2.4 Description of Five Main Models for the Design of the Future Power Market with Capacity Mechanisms in Germany -- 4.3 Capacity Management as One of the Key Business Models of the Future -- 5 Business Models for Energy Suppliers and Utilities in the ``New World´´ -- 5.1 Structuring and Description of Future Business Models -- 5.1.1 Development of a Vision for the Future of the Energy Market -- 5.1.2 Structuring and Description of Future Business Models -- 5.1.3 Value Chain of Energy Transition Business Opportunities -- 5.1.4 Criteria for Assessing and Selecting the most Promising Business Opportunities -- 5.2 Selected Examples of Business Models -- 5.2.1 Self-Consumption of Solar Energy for Households -- 5.2.2 Model for ``Tenant Electricity´´ from a Mini CHP Unit -- 5.2.3 Factors That Influence the Economic Efficiency of Energy Transition Business Models -- 5.2.4 Challenges for Municipal Utilities -- 5.3 Conclusions -- 6 Strategy Development and Organization for Future Business Models -- 6.1 Development of Positioning, Aims, and Strategies -- 6.2 Needs of Municipal Utilities in Germany in Current Market Environment -- 6.3 New Business Models Require New Structures and Processes -- 6.4 Process Model for the Development, Production, and Marketing of Energy-Related Products and Services -- 6.5 Conclusions -- 7 Summary: Main Points Concerning the Future of Energy Companies -- References -- Driving Renewables: Business Models for the Integration of Renewable Energy and e-Mobility in Europe -- 1 Introduction -- 2 E-Mobility Basics -- 3 Regulatory and Market Framework in Europe -- 3.1 European Versus National Regulation -- 3.1.1 Market Situation.

3.1.2 Regulatory Situation.

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