Rhetoric's Questions, Reading and Interpretation.

By: Mack, PeterMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandEarly Modern Literature in History Ser: Publisher: Cham : Palgrave Macmillan US, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (119 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319601588Subject(s): Literature, ModernGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Rhetoric's Questions, Reading and InterpretationDDC classification: 418.4 LOC classification: PN1-PN6790Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Rhetoric's Questions, Reading and Interpretation -- Preface and Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Chapter 1 The Questions -- Abstract -- References -- Chapter 2 Audience and Occasion -- Abstract -- How Does the Writer Address the Audience? -- How Does the Writer Take Account of the Occasion and Genre of the Speech or Text? -- How Does the Writer Respond to the Presumed Pre-existing Opinion of the Audience? -- How does the writer present him or herself to the audience? -- How Does the Writer Establish or Draw on a Relationship With the Audience? -- What Emotions Does the Writer Seek to Exhibit or Arouse? -- How Does the Writer Open the Text? -- Sample Reading 1: Chaucer-Troilus and Criseyde (c. 1385) and the audience -- References -- Chapter 3 Structure and Disposition -- Abstract -- How Does the Writer Present the Organisation of the Text to the Audience? -- How, in Fact, is the Text Structured? -- How Many Parts are There? What is the Function of Each Part? How are They Connected? -- How Does the Ending Draw the Text Together? -- What Impression Does the Writer Seek to Leave on the Audience at the End? -- How Does the Text Present andor Succeed in Its Aim or Purpose? -- Sample Reading 2: Sidney, Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 45-Structure, Argument, Style, and Tone -- References -- Chapter 4 Content 1: Narrative -- Abstract -- How Important is Narrative in the Text? -- How are the Narratives Adapted from Their Sources? -- How Does the Writer Present the Narratives? -- How Are the Narratives Made Credible? -- How are the Persons of the Narratives Presented? -- How are the Narratives Suited to the Characters? -- How Do the Narratives Depict or Imply a World Outside the Text? -- How are Argument and Narrative Interwoven? -- What Other Effects on the Audience are Achieved Through Narratives? -- References -- Chapter 5 Content 2: Argument.
Abstract -- What are the Major Questions Addressed in the Text? -- What Arguments are Deployed in the Text? -- What Forms are the Arguments Expressed in? -- What are the Sources and Bases of the Argument? -- How are the Arguments Made Convincing? -- How are the Arguments Connected Together? -- What Is the Overall Structure of the Argument of the Text and What Does It Amount to? -- What Implications or Instructions do the Arguments Convey to the Audience? -- References -- Chapter 6 Content 3: Further Elements -- Abstract -- What Descriptions are Given in the text and what is their Effect? -- How are the Comparisons in the Text Constructed, and What is Their Effect? -- How does the Text Employ Recurring Physical Objects and Imagery? -- How does the Text use Axioms and Proverbs? How are They Related to Narratives and Arguments? -- What is the Place of Dialogue and Speeches in the Text? -- What is the Role of Addressees and Audiences Within the Text? -- Where do the Examples Come From and How are They Used? -- How does the Text Develop and Use Discussions of General Themes, Commonplaces and Ideas? -- What Reading has the Author Done in Preparation for Writing this Text? -- How is the Reading Used and What Impact Does it Have on the Audience? -- How Does the Text Adapt Source Material or Imitate Earlier Texts Known to the Writer? -- What is the Role of Personal Experience (Overt or Concealed) in the Text? -- How is Humour used in the Text? -- In What Ways Does the Text Seek to Please its Audience? -- References -- Chapter 7 Style and Delivery -- Abstract -- What is the Typical Level of Style Employed in the Text? -- Are There Variations in Style? What is Their Effect? -- Does the Text Employ Stylistic Effects of Amplification, Copia, or Brevity? -- If so, Where Does This Happen and What is its Effect?.
What Sort of Vocabulary Does the Text Employ? How Does it Suit the Subject Matter? -- What Use is Made of Archaic, Non-Standard, or New Words? -- What Sort of Sentence Structure is Employed? -- How Does the Text Exploit the Opportunities Offered by Rhythm and Metre? -- How Does the Text Employ Figures of Speech and Thought, Such as Anaphora, Antithesis, Prosopopeia, and Aposiopesis (See the List Below)? -- How Does the Text Employ the Tropes, Such as Metaphor, Allegory, Irony, Metonymy, Synecdoche, and Hyperbole (See Section 3 of Previous Discussion)? -- What Part Do Stylistic Features Play in the Effect of the Text? -- Delivery -- How Does the Writer Make Use of Considerations Related to Oral Delivery and Performance? -- What is the Effect of Oral Delivery and Performance on the Audience? -- Sample Reading 5. Salman Rushdie (Born 1947), The Moor's Last Sigh (London, 1995): Style and Ecphrasis -- References -- Chapter 8 From Reading to Writing -- Abstract -- Note-taking -- Notes Made as One Reads -- Notes to be Made at the End -- Preparing for Discussion -- Commentaries -- Commentary on a set text -- Commentary on an Unseen Passage -- Writing an Essay -- Writing an Essay to a Set Title -- Writing a Free Essay -- Conclusion -- Index.
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Intro -- Rhetoric's Questions, Reading and Interpretation -- Preface and Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Chapter 1 The Questions -- Abstract -- References -- Chapter 2 Audience and Occasion -- Abstract -- How Does the Writer Address the Audience? -- How Does the Writer Take Account of the Occasion and Genre of the Speech or Text? -- How Does the Writer Respond to the Presumed Pre-existing Opinion of the Audience? -- How does the writer present him or herself to the audience? -- How Does the Writer Establish or Draw on a Relationship With the Audience? -- What Emotions Does the Writer Seek to Exhibit or Arouse? -- How Does the Writer Open the Text? -- Sample Reading 1: Chaucer-Troilus and Criseyde (c. 1385) and the audience -- References -- Chapter 3 Structure and Disposition -- Abstract -- How Does the Writer Present the Organisation of the Text to the Audience? -- How, in Fact, is the Text Structured? -- How Many Parts are There? What is the Function of Each Part? How are They Connected? -- How Does the Ending Draw the Text Together? -- What Impression Does the Writer Seek to Leave on the Audience at the End? -- How Does the Text Present andor Succeed in Its Aim or Purpose? -- Sample Reading 2: Sidney, Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 45-Structure, Argument, Style, and Tone -- References -- Chapter 4 Content 1: Narrative -- Abstract -- How Important is Narrative in the Text? -- How are the Narratives Adapted from Their Sources? -- How Does the Writer Present the Narratives? -- How Are the Narratives Made Credible? -- How are the Persons of the Narratives Presented? -- How are the Narratives Suited to the Characters? -- How Do the Narratives Depict or Imply a World Outside the Text? -- How are Argument and Narrative Interwoven? -- What Other Effects on the Audience are Achieved Through Narratives? -- References -- Chapter 5 Content 2: Argument.

Abstract -- What are the Major Questions Addressed in the Text? -- What Arguments are Deployed in the Text? -- What Forms are the Arguments Expressed in? -- What are the Sources and Bases of the Argument? -- How are the Arguments Made Convincing? -- How are the Arguments Connected Together? -- What Is the Overall Structure of the Argument of the Text and What Does It Amount to? -- What Implications or Instructions do the Arguments Convey to the Audience? -- References -- Chapter 6 Content 3: Further Elements -- Abstract -- What Descriptions are Given in the text and what is their Effect? -- How are the Comparisons in the Text Constructed, and What is Their Effect? -- How does the Text Employ Recurring Physical Objects and Imagery? -- How does the Text use Axioms and Proverbs? How are They Related to Narratives and Arguments? -- What is the Place of Dialogue and Speeches in the Text? -- What is the Role of Addressees and Audiences Within the Text? -- Where do the Examples Come From and How are They Used? -- How does the Text Develop and Use Discussions of General Themes, Commonplaces and Ideas? -- What Reading has the Author Done in Preparation for Writing this Text? -- How is the Reading Used and What Impact Does it Have on the Audience? -- How Does the Text Adapt Source Material or Imitate Earlier Texts Known to the Writer? -- What is the Role of Personal Experience (Overt or Concealed) in the Text? -- How is Humour used in the Text? -- In What Ways Does the Text Seek to Please its Audience? -- References -- Chapter 7 Style and Delivery -- Abstract -- What is the Typical Level of Style Employed in the Text? -- Are There Variations in Style? What is Their Effect? -- Does the Text Employ Stylistic Effects of Amplification, Copia, or Brevity? -- If so, Where Does This Happen and What is its Effect?.

What Sort of Vocabulary Does the Text Employ? How Does it Suit the Subject Matter? -- What Use is Made of Archaic, Non-Standard, or New Words? -- What Sort of Sentence Structure is Employed? -- How Does the Text Exploit the Opportunities Offered by Rhythm and Metre? -- How Does the Text Employ Figures of Speech and Thought, Such as Anaphora, Antithesis, Prosopopeia, and Aposiopesis (See the List Below)? -- How Does the Text Employ the Tropes, Such as Metaphor, Allegory, Irony, Metonymy, Synecdoche, and Hyperbole (See Section 3 of Previous Discussion)? -- What Part Do Stylistic Features Play in the Effect of the Text? -- Delivery -- How Does the Writer Make Use of Considerations Related to Oral Delivery and Performance? -- What is the Effect of Oral Delivery and Performance on the Audience? -- Sample Reading 5. Salman Rushdie (Born 1947), The Moor's Last Sigh (London, 1995): Style and Ecphrasis -- References -- Chapter 8 From Reading to Writing -- Abstract -- Note-taking -- Notes Made as One Reads -- Notes to be Made at the End -- Preparing for Discussion -- Commentaries -- Commentary on a set text -- Commentary on an Unseen Passage -- Writing an Essay -- Writing an Essay to a Set Title -- Writing a Free Essay -- Conclusion -- Index.

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Peter Mack FBA is Professor of English at the University of Warwick. His books include: Renaissance Argument (1993), Elizabethan Rhetoric (2002), Reading and Rhetoric in Montaigne and Shakespeare (2010) and A History of Renaissance Rhetoric 1380-1620 (2011). He has been Director of the Warburg Institute, chair of the Society for Renaissance Studies, and editor of the journal Rhetorica .

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