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Modernity and its other : the encounter with North American Indians in the eighteenth century / Robert Woods Sayre ; translated by Robert Woods Sayre.

By: Sayre, Robert, 1943- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2017Description: 1 online resource (xviii, 405 pages, 26 unnumbered pages of plates).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781496204776; 1496204778; 9781496204790; 1496204794.Uniform titles: Modernité et son autre. English Subject(s): Indians of North America -- First contact with Europeans | Travelers' writings, European -- History and criticismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Modernity and its otherDDC classification: 970.004/97 Other classification: SOC021000 | HIS036020 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
List of Illustrations Preface Acknowledgments Introduction Part 1. Views of Modernity: Internal/External Discovery 1. Crevecoeur: British America before and during the Revolutionary Upheaval 2. Philip Freneau: After the Revolution 3. Moreau de Saint-Mery: Fin de Siecle Part 2. Views of the Other: Travels in "Indian Territory" 4. The Zero Degree of the Other: Indian Violence and "Adventure" with Indians 5. Accounts of Travel in New France: Lahontan and Charlevoix 6. Anglo-American Travelers: John Lawson and Jonathan Carver 7. Travels of William Bartram, Quaker Botanist 8. Fur Traders: Alexander Mackenzie and Jean-Baptiste Trudeau Epilogue: Into the Nineteenth Century -- George Catlin Conclusion Appendix: Chronology of Historical Events, Travels, and Publications Notes Bibliography Index.
Summary: "In Modernity and Its Other Robert Woods Sayre examines eighteenth-century North America through discussion of texts drawn from the period. He focuses on this unique historical moment when early capitalist civilization (modernity) in colonial societies, especially the British, interacted closely with Indigenous communities (the "Other") before the balance of power shifted definitively toward the colonizers. Sayre considers a variety of French perspectives as a counterpoint to the Anglo-American lens, including J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur and Philip Freneau, as well as both Anglo-American and French or French Canadian travelers in "Indian territory," including William Bartram, Jonathan Carver, John Lawson, Alexander Mackenzie, Baron de Lahontan, Pierre Charlevoix and Jean-Baptiste Trudeau. Modernity and Its Other is an important addition to any North American historian's bookshelf, for it brings together the social history of the European colonies and the ethnohistory of the American Indian peoples who interacted with the colonizers."-- Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E77 .S2913 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1w6t89w Available ocn995355478

"In Modernity and Its Other Robert Woods Sayre examines eighteenth-century North America through discussion of texts drawn from the period. He focuses on this unique historical moment when early capitalist civilization (modernity) in colonial societies, especially the British, interacted closely with Indigenous communities (the "Other") before the balance of power shifted definitively toward the colonizers. Sayre considers a variety of French perspectives as a counterpoint to the Anglo-American lens, including J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur and Philip Freneau, as well as both Anglo-American and French or French Canadian travelers in "Indian territory," including William Bartram, Jonathan Carver, John Lawson, Alexander Mackenzie, Baron de Lahontan, Pierre Charlevoix and Jean-Baptiste Trudeau. Modernity and Its Other is an important addition to any North American historian's bookshelf, for it brings together the social history of the European colonies and the ethnohistory of the American Indian peoples who interacted with the colonizers."-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on November 29, 2017).

Translated from the French.

List of Illustrations Preface Acknowledgments Introduction Part 1. Views of Modernity: Internal/External Discovery 1. Crevecoeur: British America before and during the Revolutionary Upheaval 2. Philip Freneau: After the Revolution 3. Moreau de Saint-Mery: Fin de Siecle Part 2. Views of the Other: Travels in "Indian Territory" 4. The Zero Degree of the Other: Indian Violence and "Adventure" with Indians 5. Accounts of Travel in New France: Lahontan and Charlevoix 6. Anglo-American Travelers: John Lawson and Jonathan Carver 7. Travels of William Bartram, Quaker Botanist 8. Fur Traders: Alexander Mackenzie and Jean-Baptiste Trudeau Epilogue: Into the Nineteenth Century -- George Catlin Conclusion Appendix: Chronology of Historical Events, Travels, and Publications Notes Bibliography Index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This English translation of La modernité et son autre (2008) examines what bilingual historian Sayre (emer., English and American literature and civilization, Univ. of Paris East, Marne-La-Vallée) represents as the confrontation between "modernity" and "romanticism," by which he means, respectively, Western capitalism and European feudal mores. Sayre's interpenetrating analyses segregate primary sources into basic categories of travel for philosophical, military, botanical, and mercantile purposes, around which occasionally swirl adventurism. His categorical exemplars move from detached philosophers to "zero-degree" (directly violent) rogues. Intermingled with these are references to significant additional sources contemporary to his prototypes. In an epilogue, the author produces George Catlin, the 19th-century artist, author, and showman. Throughout, Sayre displays an impressive ability to embed his sources in their historically relational matrix. Unfortunately, the book's extended title is misleading, for the named Other to the Eurocapitalist self--the "Amerindians"--never actually appear, but remain an unalloyed rhetorical construction in a completely European fracas over which economic model should prevail, landed feudalism or mercantile capitalism. Likewise bewildering is the epilogue, for Catlin properly set up a 19th-century, nostalgic fantasy of "vanished" peoples, a separate, motivating premise. Notwithstanding, warts and all, this is an important title for undergraduate and graduate readers. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Barbara Alice Mann, University of Toledo

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert Woods Sayre is a professor emeritus of English and American literature and civilization at the University of Paris East, Marne-La-Vallée. He is the author of several books, including Solitude in Society: A Sociological Study in French Literature, and the coauthor (with Michael Löwy ) of Romanticism Against the Tide of Modernity .

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