Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Inglorious passages : noncombat deaths in the American Civil War / Brian Steel Wills.

By: Wills, Brian Steel, 1959- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Modern war studies.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2017Description: 1 online resource.ISBN: 9780700625093; 0700625097.Additional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 973.7/1 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: "This inglorious taking off" -- The first fatalities -- The battle in camp -- "The rhythm of the rails" -- Not fooling with Mother Nature -- Slipshod soldiering -- Not so friendly fire -- "As neere to heaven by sea" -- Industrial and storage mishaps -- Collateral casualties -- Not cheating the hangman -- Conclusion: "There is no glory in it".
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E468.9 .W58 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1x76d3f Available on1012347002

Introduction: "This inglorious taking off" -- The first fatalities -- The battle in camp -- "The rhythm of the rails" -- Not fooling with Mother Nature -- Slipshod soldiering -- Not so friendly fire -- "As neere to heaven by sea" -- Industrial and storage mishaps -- Collateral casualties -- Not cheating the hangman -- Conclusion: "There is no glory in it".

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historian Wills (Kennesaw State Univ.) poses a fascinating question: what can we learn from noncombat deaths in the Civil War? Disease alone killed far more men than did bullets, and yet the idea of "noncombat deaths" is almost completely unexplored, even in the vast literature surrounding the Civil War. How did the myriad railroad crashes, shipboard accidents, and other mishaps affect military operations? What was the impact of the disease epidemics that ravaged seemingly every army camp? And what about the home front? Wills pulls together a tremendous array of sources to tackle these questions and more. He explores seemingly every possible way for a man to die outside of battle, from industrial accidents to horse kicks to court martial. In lesser hands this could be a dull catalog of sometimes bizarre fatalities ("deaths associated with animals and mascots"), but Wills is a seasoned professional whose prose flows easily. His book does not rise to the level of metacultural analysis like Drew Faust's This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (CH, Jan'09, 46-2859), but it stands out as the only one of its kind. Summing Up: Recommended. Most academic levels/libraries. --Brian Edward Donovan, University of Iowa

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.