The Ashgate Research Companion to Popular Culture in Early Modern England.

By: Hadfield, AndrewContributor(s): Dimmock, Matthew | Shinn, AbigailMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: London : Taylor and Francis, 2016Copyright date: ©2014Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (397 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317042075Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Ashgate Research Companion to Popular Culture in Early Modern EnglandDDC classification: 306.09420903 LOC classification: 2013045830Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this excellent introduction to popular culture in early modern England, each contributor contextualizes early modern life against larger historical events. The volume is divided into three parts titled "Key Issues," "Everyday Life," and "The Experience of the World." Part 1 considers methodology, historiography, and "challenges prevailing assumptions about how we approach fundamental aspects of popular culture." Part 2 features chapters such as "Work," "Crime," and "Games." Part 3 "looks at the importance of prevailing cultural structures and apparatus to the early modern understanding of the world." Contributors are sensitive to current treatment of historical topics such as gender issues, urban life, and food culture, while paying close attention to more traditional historical considerations such as politics, religion, property, the military, and the arts. The book boasts an impressive list of contributors, and is written to be easily understood by both and expert audiences. It can be read through in its entirety as a textbook; alternatively, readers may wish to consult individual chapters as starting points for research. Ample footnotes and bibliographies for additional reading are provided. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above. --Christine Bombaro, Dickinson College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English and co-Director of the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the University of Sussex, UK.

Matthew Dimmock is Professor in English and co-Director of the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the University of Sussex, UK.

Abigail Shinn is a Teaching Fellow at the University of Leeds, UK.

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