Understanding White-Collar Crime : A Convenience Perspective.

By: Gottschalk, PetterMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Milton : Taylor and Francis, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (268 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781315350141Subject(s): White collar crimesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Understanding White-Collar Crime : A Convenience PerspectiveDDC classification: 364.168 LOC classification: HV6768.G688 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Author -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 Convenience theory of white-collar crime -- Convenience benefits and costs -- Theorizing and theory development -- Social economic conflict in society -- Marxist criminology -- Laws and law enforcement -- Reasons for punishing their own -- Theoretical model -- Conflict theory approach -- References -- Chapter 2 Economical dimension in convenience theory -- Economical profit in crime -- Profit-driven crime and markets -- Rational choice by self-interest -- Transaction costs in criminal activities -- References -- Chapter 3 Organizational dimension in convenience theory -- Organizational opportunity in crime -- Opportunity-driven financial crime -- Agency relationships in crime -- Institutional moral collapse -- Institutional theory -- Dysfunctional network theory -- Social network theory -- Conspiracy theory -- Organized crime -- Socialization theory -- Double-bind leadership -- Social disorganization -- Follower obedience in organizations -- Organizational systems failure -- References -- Chapter 4 Behavioral dimension in convenience theory -- Deviant behavior in crime -- Labeling self-identity of criminals -- Slippery slope decline -- Self-control and desire for control -- Strain for success and status -- Criminal personality disorders -- Study in Germany -- Categories of personality disorder -- Crime deterrence mechanisms -- Neutralization techniques -- Profiling risky individuals -- References -- Chapter 5 Integrated approach to convenience theory -- Integrating convenience dimensions -- Research hypotheses for convenience -- Theorizing white-collar crime and criminals -- Limits to a general white-collar crime theory -- Contributions from convenience theory -- Comparison to Sutherland's theory -- References.
Chapter 6 Empirical study of white-collar criminals -- Sample of criminals in Norway -- Economical dimension in crime -- Organizational dimension in crime -- Behavioral dimension in crime -- The case of Kerik neutralization -- References -- Chapter 7 Statements for testing convenience hypotheses -- Desire in the economical dimension -- Opportunity in the organizational dimension -- Willingness in the behavioral dimension -- Research model for convenience theory -- The case of fraudulent attorneys -- The case of two sides in corruption -- The case of Yara corruption in Libya -- References -- Chapter 8 Corporate social responsibility -- When employers become crime victims -- When others become crime victims -- Gjensidige Insurance and Hells Angels -- Gjensidige Insurance Company -- Hells Angels MC Norway -- Hells Angels club house -- Evaluation of CSR -- Asset recovery in 2015 -- Corruption case at Siemens -- What is corporate responsibility? -- Failure in corporate responsibility -- Stages of growth in corporate responsibility -- Convenience and corporate responsibility -- References -- Chapter 9 Internal white-collar crime investigations -- Police versus internal investigations -- Reasons for private investigations -- Investigative knowledge needs -- Crime disclosure by whistleblowers -- Privatization of law enforcement -- Disclosure of investigation reports -- Competence of private investigators -- Limits by investigation mandate -- Empirical sample of investigation reports -- References -- Chapter 10 The case of the Betanien investigation -- BDO investigation at Betanien -- BDO investigation report -- CEO priest prosecution in court -- CEO priest conviction in court -- Religious white-collar criminals -- Comments from the chairman of the board -- References -- Conclusion -- Index.
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HV6768 .F57 2009 Economic Gangsters : HV6768 .F736 2016 Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing Activities : HV6768.G687 2013eb Policing White-Collar Crime : HV6768.G688 2017 Understanding White-Collar Crime : HV6768 .H37 2008 Corporate crime : HV6768.H66 2009 Money Laundering : HV6768.L94 2006 Fraud and Corruption :

Cover Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Author -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 Convenience theory of white-collar crime -- Convenience benefits and costs -- Theorizing and theory development -- Social economic conflict in society -- Marxist criminology -- Laws and law enforcement -- Reasons for punishing their own -- Theoretical model -- Conflict theory approach -- References -- Chapter 2 Economical dimension in convenience theory -- Economical profit in crime -- Profit-driven crime and markets -- Rational choice by self-interest -- Transaction costs in criminal activities -- References -- Chapter 3 Organizational dimension in convenience theory -- Organizational opportunity in crime -- Opportunity-driven financial crime -- Agency relationships in crime -- Institutional moral collapse -- Institutional theory -- Dysfunctional network theory -- Social network theory -- Conspiracy theory -- Organized crime -- Socialization theory -- Double-bind leadership -- Social disorganization -- Follower obedience in organizations -- Organizational systems failure -- References -- Chapter 4 Behavioral dimension in convenience theory -- Deviant behavior in crime -- Labeling self-identity of criminals -- Slippery slope decline -- Self-control and desire for control -- Strain for success and status -- Criminal personality disorders -- Study in Germany -- Categories of personality disorder -- Crime deterrence mechanisms -- Neutralization techniques -- Profiling risky individuals -- References -- Chapter 5 Integrated approach to convenience theory -- Integrating convenience dimensions -- Research hypotheses for convenience -- Theorizing white-collar crime and criminals -- Limits to a general white-collar crime theory -- Contributions from convenience theory -- Comparison to Sutherland's theory -- References.

Chapter 6 Empirical study of white-collar criminals -- Sample of criminals in Norway -- Economical dimension in crime -- Organizational dimension in crime -- Behavioral dimension in crime -- The case of Kerik neutralization -- References -- Chapter 7 Statements for testing convenience hypotheses -- Desire in the economical dimension -- Opportunity in the organizational dimension -- Willingness in the behavioral dimension -- Research model for convenience theory -- The case of fraudulent attorneys -- The case of two sides in corruption -- The case of Yara corruption in Libya -- References -- Chapter 8 Corporate social responsibility -- When employers become crime victims -- When others become crime victims -- Gjensidige Insurance and Hells Angels -- Gjensidige Insurance Company -- Hells Angels MC Norway -- Hells Angels club house -- Evaluation of CSR -- Asset recovery in 2015 -- Corruption case at Siemens -- What is corporate responsibility? -- Failure in corporate responsibility -- Stages of growth in corporate responsibility -- Convenience and corporate responsibility -- References -- Chapter 9 Internal white-collar crime investigations -- Police versus internal investigations -- Reasons for private investigations -- Investigative knowledge needs -- Crime disclosure by whistleblowers -- Privatization of law enforcement -- Disclosure of investigation reports -- Competence of private investigators -- Limits by investigation mandate -- Empirical sample of investigation reports -- References -- Chapter 10 The case of the Betanien investigation -- BDO investigation at Betanien -- BDO investigation report -- CEO priest prosecution in court -- CEO priest conviction in court -- Religious white-collar criminals -- Comments from the chairman of the board -- References -- Conclusion -- Index.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Gottschalk (professor, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo) has published quite extensively in recent years on the investigation of fraud and on white-collar crime defense lawyers. In the present book, he advances what he characterizes as a "convenience perspective" as an integrated, general theory for understanding white-collar crime. The essence of this perspective is that white-collar crime occurs because wealthy, privileged individuals find it convenient to achieving their goals. In making the case for this perspective, Gottschalk reviews many studies relating to white-collar crime, although the literature review is quite selective and its presentation is somewhat haphazard. The book's ten chapters are devoted principally to different dimensions of white-collar crime, from organizational to behavioral, that can be linked to the core thesis (convenience), although the author devotes some attention to such matters as corporate social responsibility and internal investigations of white-collar crime. Though the book documents the complexity of white-collar crime, it is far from clear to this reader that "convenience" is the most essential unifying feature of such crime. Students of white-collar crime will at least encounter points of interest. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty, professionals. --David O. Friedrichs, University of Scranton

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Currently a visiting professor at the University of New Haven, Petter Gottschalk is a professor in the Department of Leadership and Organization at BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo, Norway. He was educated in Germany, the United States and the United Kingdom. Dr. Gottschalk has been managing director of several companies including ABB Datacables. He has published extensively on knowledge management, investigations, law enforcement, white-collar crime and defense lawyers.

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