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The last escape : the untold story of allied prisoners of war in Europe, 1944-45 / John Nichol and Tony Rennell.

By: Nichol, John, 1963-.
Contributor(s): Rennell, Tony.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Viking, 2003Edition: 1st American ed.Description: xx, 520 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0670032123; 9780670032129.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, German | Prisoners of war -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Prisoners of war -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | World War (1939-1945) | Prisoners of war | Great Britain | United States | World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, German | Prisoners of war -- United States -- History -- 20th Century | Prisoners of war -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th Century | 1900-1999Genre/Form: History.Additional physical formats: Online version:: Last escape.DDC classification: 940.54/7243
Contents:
The Russians are coming -- Abandoned to their fate -- Out into the cold -- Fears of a massacre -- The retreat from Stalag Luft IV -- The deadly road to the west -- The rivers of humanity -- Liberated by the Red Army -- Hostages of Stalin -- Waiting for Patton -- The hell of Fallingbostel -- Death by "friendly fire" -- A German savior? -- Heading for home -- Welcome back -- Epilogue -- Appendix 1. Chronology of the end of the Second World War -- Appendix 2. The Yalta Agreement on Prisoners of War, February 1945 -- Appendix 3. The senior American officer's complaint about conditions at Stalag XIIID, Nuremberg -- Appendix 4. The numbers game.
Summary: Draws on the testimony of surviving veterans to relate the experiences of American and British prisoners of war who were forced to march hundreds of miles along the Death March in the wake of the D-Day landings.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
New book University of Texas At Tyler
New book shelf - 2nd Floor
D805.G3 N496 2003 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002322790

Includes bibliographical references (pages 505-510) and index.

The Russians are coming -- Abandoned to their fate -- Out into the cold -- Fears of a massacre -- The retreat from Stalag Luft IV -- The deadly road to the west -- The rivers of humanity -- Liberated by the Red Army -- Hostages of Stalin -- Waiting for Patton -- The hell of Fallingbostel -- Death by "friendly fire" -- A German savior? -- Heading for home -- Welcome back -- Epilogue -- Appendix 1. Chronology of the end of the Second World War -- Appendix 2. The Yalta Agreement on Prisoners of War, February 1945 -- Appendix 3. The senior American officer's complaint about conditions at Stalag XIIID, Nuremberg -- Appendix 4. The numbers game.

Draws on the testimony of surviving veterans to relate the experiences of American and British prisoners of war who were forced to march hundreds of miles along the Death March in the wake of the D-Day landings.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

By June 1944, there were hundreds of thousands of Allied prisoners in German POW camps, many in eastern Germany. As the war ground on, Soviet forces began threatening the easternmost camps, and the Germans chose to march those prisoners west. It was winter, and the prisoners had to walk hundreds of miles or be transported under terrible conditions. Allied policy on POWs was in disarray, but there was a great concern that SS or other authorities would massacre prisoners or hold them as hostages. Drawing on first-person narratives and published works, British authors Nichol, a journalist and former RAF flier who became a POW during the first Gulf War, and Rennell (Last Days of Glory) concentrate primarily on British POWs and secondarily on Americans, paying virtually no attention to the many other Western allies held in German camps. How the end game played out, the fates of those camps overrun by the Soviets, and the general muddle, terror, deprivation, and determination of individual prisoners to survive makes for a complex story and a valuable addition to World War II literature. Recommended for military and political collections, and public libraries.-Edwin B. Burgess, Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John Nichol is a former RAF flight lieutenant whose Tornado bomber was shot down on a mission over lraq during the Gulf War. He was captured and became a prisoner of war. He is also a journalist and widely quoted military commentator <br> Tony Rennell: now a freelance writer, he was formerly associate editor of the Sunday Times and the Mail on Sunday

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