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Iron curtain : the crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956 / Anne Applebaum.

By: Applebaum, Anne, 1964- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Anchor Books, a division of Random House, Inc., 2013Edition: First Anchor Books edition.Description: xxxvi, 566 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781400095933; 140009593X.Subject(s): Europe, Eastern -- Relations -- Soviet Union | Soviet Union -- Relations -- Europe, Eastern | Europe, Eastern -- Politics and government -- 1945-1989 | Europe, Eastern -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Communist countries -- Politics and government | Communist countries -- Social conditions | Communism -- Europe, Eastern -- History -- 20th century | Communism -- Social aspects -- Europe, Eastern -- History -- 20th century | Political culture -- Europe, Eastern -- History -- 20th century | Political persecution -- Europe, Eastern -- History -- 20th century | Communism | Communism -- Social aspects | International relations | Political culture | Political persecution | Politics and government | Social conditions | Communist countries | Europe, Eastern | Soviet Union | 1900-1999Genre/Form: History.Additional physical formats: Online version:: Iron curtain.DDC classification: 947.0009/045
Contents:
False dawn -- Zero hour -- Victors -- Communists -- Policemen -- Violence -- Ethnic cleansing -- Youth -- Radio -- Politics -- Economics -- High Stalinism -- Reactionary enemies -- Internal enemies -- Homo Sovieticus -- Socialist realism -- Ideal cities -- Reluctant collaborators -- Passive opponents -- Revolutions --
Awards: National Book Award, Nonfiction, Finalist, 2012 | Cundill Prize in Historical Literature Winner, 2013.Summary: In the follow-up to her previous book "Gulag," the author, a journalist, delivers a history of how Communism took over Eastern Europe after World War II and transformed in frightening fashion the individuals who came under its sway. At the end of World War II, the Soviet Union, to its surprise and delight, found itself in control of a huge swath of territory in Eastern Europe. Josef Stalin and his secret police set out to convert a dozen radically different countries to Communism, a completely new political and moral system. In this book, the author describes how the Communist regimes of Eastern Europe were created and what daily life was like once they were complete. She draws on newly opened East European archives, interviews, and personal accounts translated for the first time to portray in detail the dilemmas faced by millions of individuals trying to adjust to a way of life that challenged their every belief and took away everything they had accumulated. Today the Soviet Bloc is a lost civilization, one whose cruelty, paranoia, bizarre morality, and strange aesthetics is captured in the pages of this book.Other editions: Reproduction of (manifestation):: Applebaum, Anne, 1964- Iron curtain.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 475-541) and index.

pt. 1. False dawn -- Zero hour -- Victors -- Communists -- Policemen -- Violence -- Ethnic cleansing -- Youth -- Radio -- Politics -- Economics -- pt. 2. High Stalinism -- Reactionary enemies -- Internal enemies -- Homo Sovieticus -- Socialist realism -- Ideal cities -- Reluctant collaborators -- Passive opponents -- Revolutions -- Epilogue.

In the follow-up to her previous book "Gulag," the author, a journalist, delivers a history of how Communism took over Eastern Europe after World War II and transformed in frightening fashion the individuals who came under its sway. At the end of World War II, the Soviet Union, to its surprise and delight, found itself in control of a huge swath of territory in Eastern Europe. Josef Stalin and his secret police set out to convert a dozen radically different countries to Communism, a completely new political and moral system. In this book, the author describes how the Communist regimes of Eastern Europe were created and what daily life was like once they were complete. She draws on newly opened East European archives, interviews, and personal accounts translated for the first time to portray in detail the dilemmas faced by millions of individuals trying to adjust to a way of life that challenged their every belief and took away everything they had accumulated. Today the Soviet Bloc is a lost civilization, one whose cruelty, paranoia, bizarre morality, and strange aesthetics is captured in the pages of this book.

National Book Award, Nonfiction, Finalist, 2012

Cundill Prize in Historical Literature Winner, 2013.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

When World War II came to an end in Europe in May 1945, the armies of the Soviet Union occupied all of Eastern Europe-and for the next 45 years that would be the case. Stalin and his henchmen aggressively took control of all aspects of life in the occupied nations, shutting down all independent agencies, governments, newspapers, etc., throughout the region. Within a decade, all pretense of freedom was gone for millions of citizens. Pulitzer Prizer winner Applebaum (director of political studies, Legatum Inst., London; Gulag: A History) has applied her immense knowledge-and impressive language skills-to a thorough investigation of how the Soviets under Stalin and his successors systematically established nearly totalitarian control of Eastern Europe and, in so doing, laid waste to cultures and societies that had been built over centuries. Verdict This is a powerful and sobering book, by far the best treatment to yet appear on the topic. There have been earlier studies treating individual nations (e.g., Laszlo Borhi's Hungary in the Cold War, 1945-1956, and Andrzej Paczkowski's The Spring Will Be Ours: Poland and the Poles from Occupation to Freedom, translated from Polish by Jane Cave), but no one has accomplished the synthesis of multiarchival sources that Applebaum presents here. An important and essential study of a neglected aspect of the Cold War era. [This book has been nominated for the 2012 National Book Award in nonfiction.-Ed.]-Ed Goedeken, Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Focusing mainly on Poland, East Germany, and Hungary, journalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Applebaum details the transition to communism in Eastern Europe in the early post-WWII years. Her in-depth, captivating study illustrates how the Soviet government managed this transformation by destroying civil society and building new state-controlled institutions. Soviet administrators used local collaborators, international communists trained in the USSR, the Red Army, and the Soviet and local secret police to enact deportations, ethnic cleansing, terror, purges, and mass fear to ensure the restructuring of East European societies, cultures, and economies. Picking up where Timothy Snyder left off in his Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin (2010), which focuses on the war years, Applebaum's description of the violence and tragedy that befell this region in the early postwar period is similarly haunting and distressing. In the book's last chapters, Applebaum explains how communism in Eastern Europe endured through her discussion of the ways in which many people reluctantly accepted it, passively resisted it, but ultimately allowed it to continue. This thought-provoking, well-written work will be appreciated by a wide audience. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. M. Chakars Saint Joseph's University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate . Her previous book, Gulag , won the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction and was a finalist for three other major prizes. Her essays appear in The New York Review of Books , The New Republic, and The Spectator . She is married to Radek Sikorski, the Polish Foreign Minister.</p>

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